1001 CE to 1100 CE

1,000-year-old Viking treasure found in Swedish garden

Over 60 silver coins from Europe, central Asia, and the Middle East have been found in a vegetable patch on the island of Gotland, Sweden. The discovery proves the extent of trade or looting of the Vikings.

Scientists still studying mystery of medieval skulls

Archaeologists from English Heritage have yet to formulate a theory about the change in shape of medieval skulls between the 11th and 13th centuries. The shape changed from a long, narrow head to a rounder shape.

British students find Saxon grave

A class of teenagers on a class dig have discovered the remains of a woman believed to have been Saxon in Chediston, England. The woman was buried in classic Christian style in a churchyard.

"Where Heaven and Earth Meet"

“Wo sich Himmel und Erde Begegnen” (Where heaven and earth meet) read posters advertising Stift Klosterneuburg, a 900-year-old monastery near Vienna, Austria, one of the oldest working monasteries in the country. Sarah Wildman of the New York Times visits.

An Inca in Sarpsborg

Archaeologists in Oestfold, Norway are trying to understand how an Inca Indian came to be buried in the Norwegian city in the 11th century.

UK£1m El Cid sword may be a forgery

A controversy has arisen over the authenticity of La Tizona, purported to be the sword of legendary Spanish hero El Cid. The sword was purchased recently for UK£1m by authorities in the Castilla Leon region, but others in the Culture Ministry claim that the sword is a fraud.

Battle of Hastings re-enactors duke it out on video

British television personality Dan Snow provides several short videos pertaining to English Heritage sites online. The films include a re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings.

Bayeux Tapestry comes to life

avidavid62 has posted an animated version of the Bayeux Tapestry on YouTube where the paintings actually move. The film was created by David Newton.

Move may endanger Viking ships

Critics of a plan to move three 1000-year-old Viking ships to a new museum believe that the plan could destroy the irreplaceable artifacts.

Vinland farewell

An article by Birgitta Wallace for the online version of the Canadian history magazine The Beaver looks at the settlements of the Vikings in North America and their reasons for abandoning their settlements in the New World.

Early Christian graves discovered in the Ukraine

Early Christian burials dating to the 11th and 13th centuries have been found in Chernihiv in the Ukraine. Experts believe that the 30 tombs prove that the city was important in early Russian history.

Viking Ship to Sail Next Summer

A dream will come true next summer for a group of would-be Vikings who have volunteered to sail the Danish ship Havhingsten on a seven-week, 1,000-mile voyage.

Jutland Stones May Bear New Runic Inscriptions

Seven stones have been discovered in the vicinity of Denmark's 10th century Jellinge stones. One or two of the new stones may also have runic inscriptions.

Battle of Hastings Video Online

Several video clips from the 2006 Battle of Hastings reenactment have been posted on the Living History website.

More Battle of Hastings Photos Online

Martin of Rivenstar recently attended the Battle of Hastings reenactment and shares photos taken by Lady Johanna.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 14, 1066

The Battle of Hastings was fought on October 14, 1066 between William the Bastard's Norman forces and the Saxon defenders under King Harold II. It changed forever the culture and language of the British Isles.

BBC offers live webcast of Hastings 2006

On October 14 and 15, the annual Battle of Hastings reenactment will be webcast live by the BBC. The reenactment of the famous 1066 battle between King Harold the Saxon and William the Norman takes place on the very site of the original event, which gave William the Conqueror his nickname.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 26, 1087

On September 26, 1087, William II of England, known as William Rufus, was crowned king. He succeeded his father, William the Conqueror.

Today in the Middle Ages: August 31, 1057

Leofric, Earl of Mercia and the husband of Lady Godiva, died on August 31, 1057.

Domesday Book now Online

The Domesday Book, a handwritten recording of lands and properties under William the Conqueror, is on display and also available on the internet.

10th Century Korean Palace to be Excavated

Teams of experts from North and South Korea will band together to excavate the ancient site of the Koryo Kingdom in North Korea. The site is the location of a royal palace and tombs constructed in the 10th century CE.

Saxon and Norman Artifacts Found in Southampton Dig

Excavation of a future construction site in Southampton, UK produced artifacts from the eleventh, fourteenth and twentieth centuries.

Robin Hood's Castle Discovered?

Researchers excavating a site in Bolsterstone, England believe they may have found the home of Robin Hood. Experts base their claim on the belief that the mythical Robin Hood was based on the son of the Earl of Huntingdon.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 16, 1054

On July 16, 1054, the Pope excommunicated Michael Cerularius, Patriarch of Constantinople, setting in motion the events which would divide the Eastern Orthodox from the Roman Church.

Medieval Monks, Workers to be Reburied

The bodies of 44 medieval monks and workers discovered during the contruction of an overpass in Partney, England, were reburied in mid-June.

Excavation of Hanoi's Ancient Citadel Continues

In 2003, when construction workers set out to build a new parking lot for Vietnam's legislature, they were surprised to discover the remains of a 1,000-year-old century citadel buried beneath the city.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 4, 1070

The first Roquefort cheese was made on June 4, 1070. Roquefort is a ewes' milk cheese with distinctive veins of blue mold.

Romani DNA Found in 11th Century Anglo-Saxon Skeleton

The 11th Century skeleton of a young Anglo-Saxon Christian male has found to contain a rare form of mitochondrial DNA identified as Romani.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 30, 1006

The brightest supernova seen in historical times appeared on April 30, 1006.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 24, 1066

On April 24, 1066, Halley's Comet appeared in the skies over an already unsettled England.