1001 CE to 1100 CE

11th C Fatimid Rock Crystal auction after misidentification

A rare Islamic rock crystal ewer is reclassified after being sold as post-industrial French antique for about UK£200. It will auction at Christie's London this October for more than UK£3 million. It is one of eight known extant rock crystal ewers from the period. (picture)

Early medieval inscribed finger ring found in England

Antiquities specialist Brett Hammond was impressed with a medieval finger ring discovered by a metal detector from Hinckley, England. "It was clearly an important item of treasure. It is a gold ring possibly containing a rare black diamond," he said. (photo)

Castell Aberlleiniog to be rescued in Wales

"For over 20 years I have observed the progressive deterioration of this site as the mound suffered from erosion by livestock, and the masonry became increasingly unstable and overgrown by vegetation," said Mike Yates of Cadw, the Welsh historic monuments' agency, about Castell Aberlleiniog near Llangoed, which is being rescued from further deteoration.

Vikings not driven from Canada by the Thule

New research shows that Viking settlers in Newfoundland were not driven from the country by the native Thule, a native ancestor of the Inuits. Scientific re-dating has placed the native tribes in the area 150 years after the Viking settlements.

How to Make a Viking Spoon

On Instructables, Morfmir shows step-by-step instructions for making a wooden spoon with Viking era reproduction tools (or modern equivalents).

Alleged Bayeux vandal cleared

In an announcement at the major conference on the Bayeux Tapestry which took place recently at the British Museum, Anna Eliza Stothard was cleared of an accusation of vandalizing the tapestry.

Re-enacting medieval cavalry with Henrik Olsgaard

Finnvarr has posted an "account of Duke Henrik of Havn's participation in the reenactments at Hastings in 2000/2006" on his blog. The article discusses re-enacting the medieval cavalry.

11st century Jain statue found in Pushkar, India

Archaeologists working on a site near Ajmer, India have discovered a black stone statue of Jain Tirthankar Kuntunath in a meditating posture dating to the 11th century. The statue is one of 36 discovered in old Pushkar in the past year.

DNA recovered from Viking skeletons

LiveScience reports that Jorgen Dissing of the University of Copenhagen claims to have recovered genetic material from 1000-year-old skeletons from the Danish island of Funen. The DNA samples were removed from the teeth of the ancient Vikings.

Levantia

"Levantia is a site for the social history of the Roman Empire and Near East, roughly between the ninth and thirteenth centuries. It explores this especially by means of practical reconstruction and experimentation. It also includes discussion of the issues of historiographic method and representation in public contexts."

Time Team discovers link between Welsh and King Harald

In 2007 Channel Four's Time Team was permitted to excavate a field near the village of Portskewett in Wales and discovered what it believes is a Saxon hunting lodge built by King Harald one year before the Battle of Hastings.

Bayeux Simpsons

Forget the conquest of England! Who has the couch? The Simpsons take on the Bayeux Tapestry for the opening gag.

British Museum to host international conference on the Bayeux Tapestry

On July 15-16, 2008, the British Museum will host an international conference on the Bayeux Tapestry to "highlight recent and new research on the Tapestry." The cost for both days is UK£15.

Rare Anglo-Saxon grave markers found in cathedral walls

Archaeologists are excited about the discovery of rare Anglo-Saxon grace markers in the walls of Peterborough Cathedral. The markers, which are believed to date from the 11th century, were discovered during restoration work to the cathedral.

Reburial for Anglo Saxon remains

A funeral service, spoken in Anglo-Saxon, will be held in North Lincolnshire, England, to re-inter over three thousand skeletons that were discovered there almost three decades ago. The bones were disinterred as part of a study on the history of diseases.

Arab scientists filled Dark Ages with light

Writing for The Guardian, Jim Al-Khalili sheds light on the contributions of Arab scientists in the Middle Ages.

Domesday Book online

For the first time, those wishing to do research on medieval England online will have access to one of the best resources, William the Conqueror's Domesday Book.

Cracked medieval jug may sell for US$10 million

An 11th century Egyptian rock crystal jug, one of only six known examples of its kind, may sell for as high as US$10 million at auction.

"Give us back our wee men!"

Alex Salmond, Scotland's First Minister, has expressed a grievance over the continued absence of the Lewis Chessmen from Scotland. The chessmen, ivory pieces carved sometime during the 11th century, are housed in various museums in England.

Saxon cemetery offers grisly findings

In-depth examination of a Saxon cemetery in East Yorkshire has given archaeologists some insight into the society's system of justice with the study of a dozen decapitated skeletons.

"Far Traveler" on NPR's not-to-miss list

On the Christmas Eve 2007 All Things Considered radio program, reviewer Lynn Neary spoke with Laura Miller of Salon.com and blogger Mark Sarvas of The Elegant Variation about which books from 2007 should not be missed. Included was The Far Traveler by Nancy Marie Brown.

Quest for Conquest quiz

On About.com's Medieval History page, visitors are invited to take the Quest for Conquest Quiz to test what you really know about the Norman Conquest.

Mysterious runestone identified

Experts believe that they have identified a mysterious runestone discovered under the floor of Hausken Church in Rennesøy, Rogaland, Norway.

Archaeologists find Viking Norwich

Archaeologists working in Norwich, England have discovered city walls dating back to Viking times. “Our finding gives us the old geography of the city and lets us look at the history of the defensive mechanisms used in Norwich at the time," said Andy Hutcheson, archaeology manager for NAU Archaeology.

1,000-year-old Viking treasure found in Swedish garden

Over 60 silver coins from Europe, central Asia, and the Middle East have been found in a vegetable patch on the island of Gotland, Sweden. The discovery proves the extent of trade or looting of the Vikings.

Scientists still studying mystery of medieval skulls

Archaeologists from English Heritage have yet to formulate a theory about the change in shape of medieval skulls between the 11th and 13th centuries. The shape changed from a long, narrow head to a rounder shape.

British students find Saxon grave

A class of teenagers on a class dig have discovered the remains of a woman believed to have been Saxon in Chediston, England. The woman was buried in classic Christian style in a churchyard.

"Where Heaven and Earth Meet"

“Wo sich Himmel und Erde Begegnen” (Where heaven and earth meet) read posters advertising Stift Klosterneuburg, a 900-year-old monastery near Vienna, Austria, one of the oldest working monasteries in the country. Sarah Wildman of the New York Times visits.

An Inca in Sarpsborg

Archaeologists in Oestfold, Norway are trying to understand how an Inca Indian came to be buried in the Norwegian city in the 11th century.

UK£1m El Cid sword may be a forgery

A controversy has arisen over the authenticity of La Tizona, purported to be the sword of legendary Spanish hero El Cid. The sword was purchased recently for UK£1m by authorities in the Castilla Leon region, but others in the Culture Ministry claim that the sword is a fraud.