1001 CE to 1100 CE

Rare Anglo-Saxon grave markers found in cathedral walls

Archaeologists are excited about the discovery of rare Anglo-Saxon grace markers in the walls of Peterborough Cathedral. The markers, which are believed to date from the 11th century, were discovered during restoration work to the cathedral.

Reburial for Anglo Saxon remains

A funeral service, spoken in Anglo-Saxon, will be held in North Lincolnshire, England, to re-inter over three thousand skeletons that were discovered there almost three decades ago. The bones were disinterred as part of a study on the history of diseases.

Arab scientists filled Dark Ages with light

Writing for The Guardian, Jim Al-Khalili sheds light on the contributions of Arab scientists in the Middle Ages.

Domesday Book online

For the first time, those wishing to do research on medieval England online will have access to one of the best resources, William the Conqueror's Domesday Book.

Cracked medieval jug may sell for US$10 million

An 11th century Egyptian rock crystal jug, one of only six known examples of its kind, may sell for as high as US$10 million at auction.

"Give us back our wee men!"

Alex Salmond, Scotland's First Minister, has expressed a grievance over the continued absence of the Lewis Chessmen from Scotland. The chessmen, ivory pieces carved sometime during the 11th century, are housed in various museums in England.

Saxon cemetery offers grisly findings

In-depth examination of a Saxon cemetery in East Yorkshire has given archaeologists some insight into the society's system of justice with the study of a dozen decapitated skeletons.

"Far Traveler" on NPR's not-to-miss list

On the Christmas Eve 2007 All Things Considered radio program, reviewer Lynn Neary spoke with Laura Miller of Salon.com and blogger Mark Sarvas of The Elegant Variation about which books from 2007 should not be missed. Included was The Far Traveler by Nancy Marie Brown.

Quest for Conquest quiz

On About.com's Medieval History page, visitors are invited to take the Quest for Conquest Quiz to test what you really know about the Norman Conquest.

Mysterious runestone identified

Experts believe that they have identified a mysterious runestone discovered under the floor of Hausken Church in Rennesøy, Rogaland, Norway.

Archaeologists find Viking Norwich

Archaeologists working in Norwich, England have discovered city walls dating back to Viking times. “Our finding gives us the old geography of the city and lets us look at the history of the defensive mechanisms used in Norwich at the time," said Andy Hutcheson, archaeology manager for NAU Archaeology.

1,000-year-old Viking treasure found in Swedish garden

Over 60 silver coins from Europe, central Asia, and the Middle East have been found in a vegetable patch on the island of Gotland, Sweden. The discovery proves the extent of trade or looting of the Vikings.

Scientists still studying mystery of medieval skulls

Archaeologists from English Heritage have yet to formulate a theory about the change in shape of medieval skulls between the 11th and 13th centuries. The shape changed from a long, narrow head to a rounder shape.

British students find Saxon grave

A class of teenagers on a class dig have discovered the remains of a woman believed to have been Saxon in Chediston, England. The woman was buried in classic Christian style in a churchyard.

"Where Heaven and Earth Meet"

“Wo sich Himmel und Erde Begegnen” (Where heaven and earth meet) read posters advertising Stift Klosterneuburg, a 900-year-old monastery near Vienna, Austria, one of the oldest working monasteries in the country. Sarah Wildman of the New York Times visits.

An Inca in Sarpsborg

Archaeologists in Oestfold, Norway are trying to understand how an Inca Indian came to be buried in the Norwegian city in the 11th century.

UK£1m El Cid sword may be a forgery

A controversy has arisen over the authenticity of La Tizona, purported to be the sword of legendary Spanish hero El Cid. The sword was purchased recently for UK£1m by authorities in the Castilla Leon region, but others in the Culture Ministry claim that the sword is a fraud.

Battle of Hastings re-enactors duke it out on video

British television personality Dan Snow provides several short videos pertaining to English Heritage sites online. The films include a re-enactment of the Battle of Hastings.

Bayeux Tapestry comes to life

avidavid62 has posted an animated version of the Bayeux Tapestry on YouTube where the paintings actually move. The film was created by David Newton.

Move may endanger Viking ships

Critics of a plan to move three 1000-year-old Viking ships to a new museum believe that the plan could destroy the irreplaceable artifacts.

Vinland farewell

An article by Birgitta Wallace for the online version of the Canadian history magazine The Beaver looks at the settlements of the Vikings in North America and their reasons for abandoning their settlements in the New World.

Early Christian graves discovered in the Ukraine

Early Christian burials dating to the 11th and 13th centuries have been found in Chernihiv in the Ukraine. Experts believe that the 30 tombs prove that the city was important in early Russian history.

Viking Ship to Sail Next Summer

A dream will come true next summer for a group of would-be Vikings who have volunteered to sail the Danish ship Havhingsten on a seven-week, 1,000-mile voyage.

Jutland Stones May Bear New Runic Inscriptions

Seven stones have been discovered in the vicinity of Denmark's 10th century Jellinge stones. One or two of the new stones may also have runic inscriptions.

Battle of Hastings Video Online

Several video clips from the 2006 Battle of Hastings reenactment have been posted on the Living History website.

More Battle of Hastings Photos Online

Martin of Rivenstar recently attended the Battle of Hastings reenactment and shares photos taken by Lady Johanna.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 14, 1066

The Battle of Hastings was fought on October 14, 1066 between William the Bastard's Norman forces and the Saxon defenders under King Harold II. It changed forever the culture and language of the British Isles.

BBC offers live webcast of Hastings 2006

On October 14 and 15, the annual Battle of Hastings reenactment will be webcast live by the BBC. The reenactment of the famous 1066 battle between King Harold the Saxon and William the Norman takes place on the very site of the original event, which gave William the Conqueror his nickname.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 26, 1087

On September 26, 1087, William II of England, known as William Rufus, was crowned king. He succeeded his father, William the Conqueror.

Today in the Middle Ages: August 31, 1057

Leofric, Earl of Mercia and the husband of Lady Godiva, died on August 31, 1057.