1001 CE to 1100 CE

Crusaders: Villains or saints?

Historians have long debated the motives and actions of the medieval crusaders who took the Holy Land by force in the 11th century. New York Times reviewer Eric Ormsby has a review.

Irish discoveries give insight into Norman archery

The discovery of “bows and parts of bows, arrows and arrow fragments and an array of arrowheads” in an Irish bog dating to the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland may give insight into the types of equipment used by the Normans.

11th century Viking house found in Dublin

Workers for the Office of Public Works (OPW) in Dublin, Ireland have unearthed evidence of an 11th century Viking settlement on the north shore of the Liffey River.

Viewers challenged to "Name that movie!"

The SyFy Channel is offering viewers a chance to name a film set in the Middle Ages. The winner will receive an "amateur filmmaking kit," including camera, computer and software.

The history of skiing

In an article for the physorg.com website, Traci Thomas looks at the origins of skiing, from the swift Norse god Ullr to its depiction in an 11th century Swedish rune stone.

Celtic Psalter on display for first time at the University of Edinburgh

The Celtic Psalter, Scotland's oldest book, dating to the 11th century, has been placed on display at the University of Edinburgh for the first time in history. The book contains "hand-written psalms in Latin, with Celtic and Pictish illustrations."

11th century recycling center found near York

The discovery of more than 1,000 pieces of iron, including arrowheads and axe heads, have led experts to believe that they have found "York’s first metal recycling centre." The materials were gathered together after a battle for reuse.

Crofter finds Norse anchor on Skye

A Scottish crofter working on a drain on the Isle of Skye was "stunned" to discover an anchor that is believed to date to Viking times. (photo)

Heian Period makeup kit found in Japan

A makeup kit, which includes scissors and tweezers, dating to the Heian Period (794-1192), has been discovered in a tomb in Nishiwaki, Japan. (photo)

Medieval Paris' "Carolingian Wall" found

A team of archaeologists from the Institut national des recherches archaeologiques has discovered the fortifications of medieval Paris.

Medievalist Laura Ashe wins Philip Leverhulme Prize

Dr Laura Ashe, a professor in the English Faculty at Oxford University, has been awarded the prestigious Philip Leverhulme Prize given to academics under the age of 36 for "contribution to their particular field of study, are recognised at an international level, and whose future contributions are held to be of correspondingly high promise."

Gaming like it's 1066

1066, an online game produced by the BBC's Channel 4, allows players to recreate the "English vs Vikings" battles of 1066.

Stamford Bridge helmet found in antique shop

A rusty helmet labeled "Viking Helmet found in the River Derwent at Stamford Bridge by D R Lancaster, May 21, 1950" has been discovered in a Midlands, England antique shop. The helmet has been dated by experts to the 11th century.

Sites of conquest

A new series of articles in the online BBC History Magazine will cover famous historical sites. The first article looks at ten "places associated with the momentous events of 1066 and its aftermath."

Canterbury's oak rafters date to Norman times

Restoration work at England's Canterbury Cathedral has uncovered oak roof rafters dating to the time of William the Conqueror. While much of the cathedral's roof has been destroyed and rebuilt over the centuries, some of the 11th century timbers survive.

Fleamarket find might be Templar artifact

Christie's auction house in London is trying to verify claims that an ornately-decorated piece of wood, found at an English car boot sale, might be the door of a Templar tabernacle, dating from between 700 and 1200 C.E. (photo)

1,000-year-old tree mark discovered in Prague

Archaeologists have discovered a star-shaped tree mark near Celakovice in the Czech Republic. The mark, probably the oldest such mark ever discovered, is believed to have marked territory.

Fabric Dragon

Fabric Dragon sells many items, but of especial interest to most SCAdians are the linen threads in multiple weights and colors, silk threads in multiple weights, colors, and degree of twist, beads (including those small enough to use easily in embroidery) and pearls of various types.

BBC Radio 4 presents "Tales Before the Stave"

A thirty-minute podcast from BBC Radio 4 features the story of the Winchester Troper, a seminal musical book created around 1030 CE in Winchester, England.

Krazy Kat Fiberhaus

Purveyors of fine needlework supplies, Krazy Kat Fiberhaus carries all kinds of threads, patterns and notions usable and appreciated by the Historic needleworker. They have Sylke Gilt Twist, Slate Frames, fine linens and threads of silk, linen and gold.

Launceston Castle damaged by vandals

Officials at English Heritage are "very angry" over the vandalism of Launceston Castle in Cornwall. The 11th century structure was originally built by William the Conqueror's half-brother in 1075, and largely reconstructed in the 13th century. (video)

Fish shortage drove medieval fishermen to sea

A new study by James Barrett from Cambridge University's McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research, shows that around 1,000 C.E., medieval people were forced to begin fishing in the ocean due to a shortage of fresh water fish.

BBC's Channel 4 takes on Hastings

In mid-May, 2009, Channel 4 of the BBC premiered a two-part mini-series dramatizing the events leading up to the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The film, 1066: the Battle for Middle Earth, was directed by Justin Hardy who was interviewed for the Telegraph.

Tulips brought to Europe by the Turks

New research by experts at the University of Cordoba and the School of Arabic Studies seems to indicate that the first tulips in Europe were brought to Islamic Spain by way of Byzantium. The bulbs could then have been brought to Holland, where they became the country's symbol.

Swedish parking marker found to be runestone

Rainy weather, washing mud from a parking lot marker in Sweden, brought about a near "religious experience" for Stockholm County Museum runic expert Lars Andersson, who was able to identify marks on the stone as runes.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 19, 1012

Ælfheah, Archbishop of Canterbury, was martyred on April 19, 1012 in Greenwich, England.

"Severed Ways" explores Viking discovery of America

Severed Ways: The Norse Discovery of America, a 2007 film written and directed by Tony Stone, tells the story of two Norsemen stranded in North America in the year 1007 who are forced to survive by their wits.

"Good" penny returns to Malmesbury Abbey

An 11th century silver penny stolen from Malmesbury Abbey has come home. The coin was stolen in June 2008 from a display case in the abbey.

Sewer construction unearths Roman and medieval settlements in Cumbria

Sewer construction near Penrith in northern England has uncovered a Roman settlement a mere meter beneath the soil. The project has also unearthed several medieval buildings, including a rare Grubenhauser. (photos)

"1066: the Movie" awaiting release

1066: the Movie, a film starring Gary Daniels and Martin Klebba, was scheduled for release in September 2008, but has yet to hit theaters. The website includes production information, a blog, a gallery and a really great poster.