1001 CE to 1100 CE

Coppergate woman "brought to life"

For the first time, the public will be able to look at the face of a Viking woman, complete with bonnet, whose skeleton was discovered 30 years ago at Coppergate in York, England. (photo)

Vinland the Good

A short documentary, entitled The Vinland Mystery, looks at the search for the "only known Norse settlement in North America - Vinland the Good."

Beowulf: It Was Epic!

A recent immersion event in the Barony of Concordia of the Snows, East Kingdom, brought vividly to life the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf in a way seldom seen at SCA events.

Bayeux Tapestry: Tape backup media, medieval style

An article in The Register, an information technology publication online, concludes that the Bayeux Tapestry is perhaps the world's oldest example of a tape backup system.

Irish stone crosses subject of thesis

In her 1991 Master's Thesis, The Role of the High Cross in Early Christian Ireland: 8th to 11th Centuries, Jill Quattlebaum discusses the early Christian Church in Ireland and the importance of the stone cross as its symbol. The thesis is available to read online.

11th century English church damaged during theft

Police in Idsworth, England, are looking for thieves who stole the collection box from the 11th century St Hubert’s Church. In addition to the theft, the burglars caused damage to the historic church.

Young Viking raiders bring shock and awww to English town

In honor of the 26th annual York Viking Festival, local school children have put on their Viking gear and invaded the festival, spreading fear and cuteness throughout the land.

Viking artifacts links

Researchers of all things Viking may want to visit the Vikverir website which features a links page of museums throughout Scandinavia which have posted photos of their collections.

Lindisfarne Gospels online for the first time

The British Library has announced that digitized copies of two "iconic treasures" from the Anglo Saxon era have been added to the library's Digitised Manuscripts site: the Lindisfarne Gospels and the Old English Hexateuch.

Tunics shop on Etsy.com

Hailing from the Barony of Fettburg, Jerry, the owner of Tunics specializes in the making of Viking style tunics based on the Birka pattern. Using only the best wools, linens and linen blends, he creates a garment that is very comfortable to wear, durable and affordable.

El Cid: epitome of the medieval leader?

Benjamin Smith is a professor in the Department of Languages and Cultures at Minnesota State University Moorhead. His paper, Principles of Leadership in the Middle Ages: The case of Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar has been recommended by Medievalists.net.

Tons of Song Dynasty coins found in Chinese kiln

Several tons of copper coins dating to the Song Dynasty (960-1279 CE) were found recently in an ancient kiln in northwest China’s Shaanxi Province. The coins were strung into ropes through a center hole. (photos)

Counting the days, Julian-style

On the website Some Notes on Medieval English Genealogy, Chris Phillips has posted a Julian calender, used in England from the 11th - 16th centuries, and it is organized either by historical year or by regnal year.

Restorations due at Westminster Abbey before royal wedding

The announcement that the upcoming wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton comes as mana from heaven for officials responsible for the upkeep of Westminter Abbey, the site of the spring nuptials.

Modern economic analysis of the Domesday Book

In 1086, William the Conqueror undertook the daunting task of cataloging his estates and possesions in England. The results are known as the Domesday Book. Now author John McDonald is using modern economic analysis to evaluate the productivity of the Wiltshire estates.

[EAS] A Shire Twelve Night 1078

The year comes to a close here in the small demense of Fair Haven Hall. Travelers and subjects of the manor make the trek to the small Northumbrian hamlet to spend the final day of the Christmastide in music dance, games, merriment and a camaraderie little seen outside the immense oaken doors of the picturesque hall.

Genetic links may show Vikings brought Americans to Iceland

According to new research, Viking explorers brought a Native American woman to Iceland in the 11th century, an act borne out by evidence of Native American genes in 80 modern Icelanders. Results of the study by Spain's Centre for Scientific Research will be published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

The massacre of St Brice’s Day

Experts believe they have solved the puzzle of the mass Viking grave discovered in 2008 beneath St John’s College, St Giles, England: Ethnic cleansing.

Russia hopes to attract tourists to medieval city

Centuries before St. Petersburg, Velikiy Novgorod was a European-wide trading center and Russia's gateway to the West. Now Russian officials are hoping to attract history-loving tourists to the country's oldest Slavic city.

Medieval graves found in Siberia

Siberian archeologists are working to excavate a medieval cemetery, dating to the 11th century, near the River Angara in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia. Over 10,000 items such as jewelry, pottery and tools have been found.

Re-enactors meet for Battle of Hastings anniversary

Each year, re-enactors gather on the fields of Hastings, England to re-create the 1066 Battle of Hastings in Battle where King Harold was defeated by William, Duke of Normandy. (slideshow)

Early medieval hospital found

Archaeologists working at the site of a former Leper Hospital at St Mary Magdalen in Winchester, England believe the hospital may date to the 11th century, making it the earliest known hospital in Britain.

Persian masterpiece on display at the Sackler Gallery

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. offers the exhibit Shahnama: 1000 Years of the Persian Book of Kings October 23, 2010 - April 17, 2011. The rare paintings of kings, heroes and mythological creatures are from the Shahnama, Iran's national epic.

Saxon window found in England

A window, complete with working wood shutter, has been discovered during repairs to a church in Boxford, England. Stonework and mortar have helped date the window to before the Norman conquest of 1066.

"Remodeling" of Anglo Saxon Lincolnshire

Soon after the Norman invasion of England, William the Conqueror ordered the construction of a castle in the old Roman fort at Lincoln, England, casuing the destruction of over 100 Saxon homes. Now archaeologists have found their remains.

How Normans changed the English language forever

In 1066, William the Conqueror invaded England. Since then, Norman names, such as William, Henry and Alice, have dominated Brittish naming preferences, and it is in the language where they may have left their greatest mark.

Vikings turned profits in Canadian Arctic

Patricia Sutherland of the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Ottawa knows that Vikings traveled to North America. The Vikings of her area of interest, however, were not in the New World to colonize, but to make a quick profit.

Tewkesbury Medieval Fair features 11th century Saxon poop

Discovered in 1991 in Gloucestershire, England, a small pile of 11th century human feces has become something of a phenonmenon with the British public, drawing 11,000 visitors to the Discovery Zone of the Cheltenham Science Festival. Recently the exhibit was displayed at the Tewkesbury Medieval Fair.

Pennsic to feature "1066 Battle"

On Wednesday August 11, the battlefield at Pennsic XXXIX will feature the Battle of Hastings - Chainmail Battle, a period armor battle for those with 11th century armor.

Rune stones bore multiple messages

Swedish rune stones conveyed their meanings to their contemporaries in more ways than just through text, new research claims.