Opinion

Editorials, political commentary, essays, position papers, and similar items. Opinions reflect those of the writer only and not necessarily of the staff or management of SCAtoday.net.

Understanding of "distant past" key to modern civilization

Tom Holland, author of Rubicon and Persian Fire defends classical education in an article for Britain's The Guardian. Holland feels the study of the Greeks and Romans is necessary to understand modern democracy.

Staging Wagner's 'Tristan and Isolde'

"Staging Wagner’s 'Tristan und Isolde' is a notoriously treacherous proposition," begins Matthew Gurewitsch, as he examines many different versions of the story which have appeared on stage.

Gulf Wars: A 'Review' by a first time attendee

Siegfried Sebastian Faust, a first-time attendee at Gulf Wars XVI, has posted a review of the event on the Atlantia list, touching especially on how the war compares to Pennsic.

"The populace hath done spoken!"

Inspired by Asrune's post on a Celtic music forum, Lady Fionnghuala na Lamh-Bann, of the East Kingdom, set out to find "the most overplayed/ oversung songs that you hear CONSTANTLY around the SCA campfires", and surveyed the populace at large to find out which songs made the most people cringe in horror.

Latin and Greek are not dead

Cambridge Classics professor Mary Beard discusses the importance of the study of classical languages in an essay for the Guardian.

Renaissance Faire puzzles Pennsylvania student

In an editorial for the Kutztown University Keystone, journalism student Nate Carrick ponders what makes human beings turn to fantasy as an escape after a visit to the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire.

DVD Review: "Opening Doors to Great Guest Experiences"

Folo Watkins, from the Middle Kingdom, participates in the SCA and other living history groups. He reviews Opening Doors to Great Guest Experiences, an instructional video aimed at helping museums create better exhibits and public demonstrations, and finds that it would also benefit living history organizations.

Rome -- the Eternal Source Material

An entertaining new essay by Allan Massie explores the continuing fascination of Rome for fiction writers and moviemakers -- and their audiences.

Hobbitfest: Masterpiece of Imaginative Fiction or Faux Medieval Dirge?

"On the day that we are all invited to join in a worldwide Hobbitfest, two contrasting views of The Lord of the Rings: is it a masterpiece of imaginative fiction, or a faux medieval dirge?"

Proof at last: The Internet is Period!

There are those in our beloved Society who believe that the use of computers and the Internet, however convenient, somehow contaminates our historical accuracy. Some of these naysayers, to be sure, are rogues and scoundrels of the most common sort, yet others are of noble and virtuous demeanor and are merely misguided in their thinking.

Ring around the Rosie: A Dissenting View

Magistra Nicolaa de Bracton, who has researched the nursery rhyme's controversial origins for Tournaments Illuminated, offers a rebuttal of a web article linked from SCAtoday.net recently.

Why Do People Love the SCA So Much?

In an article for the Renaissance Store (Chivalry Sports), Mistress Ælfled of Duckford (Sandra Dodd) discusses "What Makes Normally Sane Adults Love the SCA So Much?"

"Walking the Walk": Hurricane Katrina Relief

Baron Pavel, from Grimfells in the Kingdom of Calontir, relates how he spent a day helping with hurricane relief by volunteering at a distribution warehouse.

Blogger Suggests that Marco Polo did not Reach China

In his blog, teacher and Asianist Jonathan Dresner discusses the myth of Marco Polo, whether or not he really made it to China, and where to go to get the facts.

Sex in the Roman City

Natalie Bennett reviews Looking at Lovemaking: Constructions of Sexuality in Roman Art, 100 B.C. - A.D. 250, a new book by John R. Clarke that looks at sexuality and gender issues in Roman society.

Event Report: A Regular Event in the Cleftlands

Lady Sorcha attended the Barony of Cleftlands' signature event, "A Regular Event in the Cleftlands", and brings us her report of the day's festivities.

Newswise: Laptops to Replace Picks?

University of New York at Buffalo geophysicist Gregory S. Baker believes laptops may be more effective tools for archeologists than picks and trowels.

In praise of Dungeons & Dragons™

How many of us medieval enthusiasts owe our fascination with the Middle Ages to role-playing fantasy games played as a child? Peter Bebergal, writing for the Boston Globe, celebrates D&D's 30 year anniversary.

New Yorker: Why Read Shakespeare?

Adam Gopnik, Critic at Large for the New Yorker, offers his opinion on why Shakepeare remains "the necessary poet".

Serious Disaster Preparedness

Tech columnist Glenn Harlan Reynolds suggests that re-enactors, including SCA members, have an interest in older technology.

Not much to like about King Arthur

National Public Radio's Bob Mondello found the new film King Arthur lacking in charm.

Tolkien Studies: An Annual Scholary Review Vol.1 2004

A brief review of a newly-released scholarly publication on Tolkien's mythology.

Snow No Deterrent to Mystery at the Masque

The Masque of Courtly Love VII: "Mystery at the Masque," the Marche of Alderford's annual winter event was held February 15, 2003. The photo album is now online.