901 CE to 1000 CE

Remnants of 9th century walls found in Prague

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of walls dating to the 9th and 10th centuries in Malostranske namesti square in Prague. The 6 meter high walls were constructed of wood and clay.

DNA and linguistic studies show Liverpool's Viking heritage

Researchers believe that the area around Liverpool, England was a Viking settlement. Their findings are based on original surnames and DNA evidence.

"Harrogate Hoard" wows archaeologists

"The most important Viking find in Britain in 150 years" has just been discovered in a Yorkshire field. Among the over 8,500 objects found was a rare silver gilt cup, one of only two in existence.

Viking clothing found in Pskov, Russia

Peter Beatson has published an extensive online report detailing the work of researchers E. Zubkova, O. Orfinskaya, D. Likhachev on the discovery of Viking-age textiles in three chamber graves in Pskov, Russia in 2006.

Ancient Bulgarian inscription found on tomb

Archaeologist Kazimir Popkonstantikov has discovered an inscription on a tomb from the Middle Ages in high medieval Bulgarian, a rare instance of the language. The inscription chronicled the burial site of a monk in a 10th century monastery.

Viking ship resurfaces under UK pub.

A team from Nottingham University's archaeology department believes it has rediscovered the remains of an intact Viking boat under a Merseyside pub.

Sea Stallion reaches Ireland

After several serious set-backs, the Viking ship Sea Stallion has reached Dublin, Ireland. The ship, with its 65-member crew, left Denmark on July 1, 2007 for the historic voyage.

Early medieval mosque found in Sicily

Amid the Renaissance, Greek and Norman ruins on the island of Sicily, archaeologists have made a surprising find: the remains of an early medieval mosque dating to the 9th or 10th century.

Father and son treasure hunters discover Viking treasure worth UK£1M

Father and son metal detector team David and Andrew Whelan unveiled a glittering haul of gold and silver Viking treasure in a North Yorkshire field, hailed as the most significant find of its kind in England for more than 150 years.

Voyage of the Sea Stallion

On July 1, 2007, a crew of 65 men and women set sail from Denmark to Dublin on a reconstructed Viking warship called the Sea Stallion. The project's goal was to recreate the journey of the Viking raiding parties.

Turkey Restores Ancient Armenian Church as Show of Goodwill

Akdamar Church, also called the Church of Surp Khach, or Holy Cross, an Armenian structure dating back to 921 C.E., is being restored in a US$1.5 million project being undertaken by Turkey as a step towards improving relationships between the two neighboring countries.

"Lost" Islamic kingdom discovered

A team of French archaeologists have discovered three towns in the Rift Valley of Ethiopia which they believe are part of the "lost" Islamic kingdom of Shoa. The Muslim stronghold was an important stop on the trade route from the 10th to the 16th centuries.

Viking Ship Replica on Endangered List

A replica of the Gokstad Viking ship, built in Norway and sailed across the Atlantic to be exhibited in the 1896 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, has been listed as an Endangered Historic Site by a landmarks commission in Illinois.

History Channel explores the Dark Ages

On Sunday March 4, 2007, the History Channel will premiere a two-hour program on the history of the Dark Ages. Long characterized as barbaric and uncivilized, the program will attempt to dispel the myths and explore the real and varied history of the period.

Plan of St. Gall online

A website has been created to showcase the Plan of St. Gall (Codex Sangallensis 1092), "the earliest preserved and most extraordinary visualization of a building complex produced in the Middle Ages."

Snorri Sturluson was wrong

A new investigation of the cathedral in Trondheim, Norway, has revealed that Icelandic literary hero Snorri Sturluson had been wrong in his documentation of the cathedral’s history.

Today in the Middle Ages: December 19, 960

On December 19, 960 C.E., the citizens of Kyoto, Japan began to rebuild the city after it was ravaged by fire.

Jutland Stones May Bear New Runic Inscriptions

Seven stones have been discovered in the vicinity of Denmark's 10th century Jellinge stones. One or two of the new stones may also have runic inscriptions.

Kinder, Gentler Vikings

Dr Andrew Heald, the Later Iron Age and Early Historic Curator at the National Museums of Scotland, tries to lay to rest myths about the cruelty of Vikings in an article for The Scotsman.

1100-Year-Old Viking Boat Discovered in Ireland

Archaeologists working on a trench near Castlebar, County Mayo, Ireland, have discovered a 10-foot-long, wooden boat believed to be from the Viking era. The craft may have been a cargo carrier or a fishing boat.

Public Allowed to Join in Welsh Dig

Members of the public will have an opportunity to help excavate the site of an early Christian cemetery in Pembrokeshire.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 3, 987

Hugh Capet was crowned King of France on July 3, 987, ending the Carolingian dynasty. His descendants would continue to reign until the French Revolution.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 27, 992

Conan "the Crooked," Count of Rennes and Duke of Brittany, died on June 27, 992.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 23, 930

The first session of the Icelandic Althing, often considered the world's first parliament, began on June 23, 930.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 12, 918

Ethelfleda, oldest daughter of King Alfred the Great of Wessex, died on June 12, 918.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 14, 964

Pope John XII died in his mistress' house on May 14, 964.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 2, 907

Boris I of Bulgaria died on May 2, 907.

Ownership Dispute Stops Auction of Mosque Beams

Christie's withdrew from auction five wooden beams from Cordoba's Great Mosque after questions arose about who rightfully owned them.

Norman Weapons

Patrick Kelly of the Albion Benefactor's Society, has written an article on the history of weapons used by the 10th and 11th century Normans.

10th Century Bulgarian Church Slated for Restoration

Boyana Church near Sofia, Bulgaria has received a UNESCO grant to help with restoration in the aftermath of 2005's floods.