901 CE to 1000 CE

Early Buddhist paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

An exhibit of early Buddhist manuscript paintings from India, many on dried palm leaves, is being hosted by New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Early Buddhist Manuscript Painting: The Palm Leaf Tradition will be on display through March 22, 2009.

How to Make a Viking Spoon

On Instructables, Morfmir shows step-by-step instructions for making a wooden spoon with Viking era reproduction tools (or modern equivalents).

How do you say "football" in Welsh?

Perhaps football is not as modern of a game as we believed. References to versions of the game have been found as early as the 10th century in Welsh literature and in the Black Book of Carmarthen, the first manuscript written in Welsh, in the 13th.

A tour of "remarkable Viking sites"

Jeff Lukovich takes visitors on a unique tour of Newfoundland's Viking sites in an article for Canada.com.


"Levantia is a site for the social history of the Roman Empire and Near East, roughly between the ninth and thirteenth centuries. It explores this especially by means of practical reconstruction and experimentation. It also includes discussion of the issues of historiographic method and representation in public contexts."

10th century Temple of Lord Vishnu discovered

Archaeologists have discovered a 10th century temple dedicated to Lord Vishnu in the village of Hathigan near Purva Khas in Karchana, India. "With the invaders having destroyed temples during the time, it is indeed rare that a beautifully carved plinth (from the temple) is still existing," said Dr DP Dubey of Allahabad University's Department of Ancient History, Culture and Archaeology.

Cod bones tell tales

"Fish heads, fish heads..." A recent study of European cod bones shows that "cod were exploited in the Middle Ages from many, often distant, fishing grounds, with an international trade in dried stockfish." The fish were much larger in medieval times, and began to began to be traded around the year 1000 C.E.

10th century gold and glass ring found in Yorkshire

A gold ring with a glass setting found by metal detector Colin Ashton near Wetherby, Yorkshire, has been declared treasure. The ring dates to the 10th century. (photo)

Viking women had sex appeal

Recent discoveries in a 10th century gravesite in the Russian town of Pskov, Novgorod lead researchers to believe that Viking women dressed more provocatively than previously believed. New research may show that women's garments were open at the front, revealing an underdress with a train in the back.

Archaeologists uncover Prague's oldest ramparts

Archaeologists have uncovered parts of Prague's oldest ramparts, dating back to the 9th and 10th centuries. The remnants of the wall, which was part of one of Prague's main entrance gates, were discovered in the cellar of the Academy of Performing Arts building.

Create your Dark Ages character

The History Channel online lets you create your own Dark Ages character - complete with your face! Have fun designing a noble, Viking, cleric or peasant.

Remnants of 9th century walls found in Prague

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of walls dating to the 9th and 10th centuries in Malostranske namesti square in Prague. The 6 meter high walls were constructed of wood and clay.

DNA and linguistic studies show Liverpool's Viking heritage

Researchers believe that the area around Liverpool, England was a Viking settlement. Their findings are based on original surnames and DNA evidence.

"Harrogate Hoard" wows archaeologists

"The most important Viking find in Britain in 150 years" has just been discovered in a Yorkshire field. Among the over 8,500 objects found was a rare silver gilt cup, one of only two in existence.

Viking clothing found in Pskov, Russia

Peter Beatson has published an extensive online report detailing the work of researchers E. Zubkova, O. Orfinskaya, D. Likhachev on the discovery of Viking-age textiles in three chamber graves in Pskov, Russia in 2006.

Ancient Bulgarian inscription found on tomb

Archaeologist Kazimir Popkonstantikov has discovered an inscription on a tomb from the Middle Ages in high medieval Bulgarian, a rare instance of the language. The inscription chronicled the burial site of a monk in a 10th century monastery.

Viking ship resurfaces under UK pub.

A team from Nottingham University's archaeology department believes it has rediscovered the remains of an intact Viking boat under a Merseyside pub.

Sea Stallion reaches Ireland

After several serious set-backs, the Viking ship Sea Stallion has reached Dublin, Ireland. The ship, with its 65-member crew, left Denmark on July 1, 2007 for the historic voyage.

Early medieval mosque found in Sicily

Amid the Renaissance, Greek and Norman ruins on the island of Sicily, archaeologists have made a surprising find: the remains of an early medieval mosque dating to the 9th or 10th century.

Father and son treasure hunters discover Viking treasure worth UK£1M

Father and son metal detector team David and Andrew Whelan unveiled a glittering haul of gold and silver Viking treasure in a North Yorkshire field, hailed as the most significant find of its kind in England for more than 150 years.

Voyage of the Sea Stallion

On July 1, 2007, a crew of 65 men and women set sail from Denmark to Dublin on a reconstructed Viking warship called the Sea Stallion. The project's goal was to recreate the journey of the Viking raiding parties.

Turkey Restores Ancient Armenian Church as Show of Goodwill

Akdamar Church, also called the Church of Surp Khach, or Holy Cross, an Armenian structure dating back to 921 C.E., is being restored in a US$1.5 million project being undertaken by Turkey as a step towards improving relationships between the two neighboring countries.

"Lost" Islamic kingdom discovered

A team of French archaeologists have discovered three towns in the Rift Valley of Ethiopia which they believe are part of the "lost" Islamic kingdom of Shoa. The Muslim stronghold was an important stop on the trade route from the 10th to the 16th centuries.

Viking Ship Replica on Endangered List

A replica of the Gokstad Viking ship, built in Norway and sailed across the Atlantic to be exhibited in the 1896 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, has been listed as an Endangered Historic Site by a landmarks commission in Illinois.

History Channel explores the Dark Ages

On Sunday March 4, 2007, the History Channel will premiere a two-hour program on the history of the Dark Ages. Long characterized as barbaric and uncivilized, the program will attempt to dispel the myths and explore the real and varied history of the period.

Plan of St. Gall online

A website has been created to showcase the Plan of St. Gall (Codex Sangallensis 1092), "the earliest preserved and most extraordinary visualization of a building complex produced in the Middle Ages."

Snorri Sturluson was wrong

A new investigation of the cathedral in Trondheim, Norway, has revealed that Icelandic literary hero Snorri Sturluson had been wrong in his documentation of the cathedral’s history.

Today in the Middle Ages: December 19, 960

On December 19, 960 C.E., the citizens of Kyoto, Japan began to rebuild the city after it was ravaged by fire.

Jutland Stones May Bear New Runic Inscriptions

Seven stones have been discovered in the vicinity of Denmark's 10th century Jellinge stones. One or two of the new stones may also have runic inscriptions.

Kinder, Gentler Vikings

Dr Andrew Heald, the Later Iron Age and Early Historic Curator at the National Museums of Scotland, tries to lay to rest myths about the cruelty of Vikings in an article for The Scotsman.