901 CE to 1000 CE

Legos retell the Battle of Maldon

The happy combination of history and Legos returns with The Battle of Maldon, an animated version of the 10th century battle between Earl Byrhtnoth and Viking raiders. The film was created by David Waugh for DTG Productions.

10th century pen nibs found in Bulgaria

Archaeologists have discovered a set of 11 bronze pen nibs dating back to the Age of Simeon I of Bulgaria. The artifacts were found at the site of a royal palace and church complex that housed a literary school during that time period.

Ancient Arabic manuscripts reveal abnormal weather patterns

Modern scientists hope to study global weather patterns with the help of ancient scholars. Using writings from 9th and 10th century Iraq, a team of scientists from the Universidad de Extremadura hope to learn about climate change by comparing ancient and modern data.

Sweden's National Historical Museum artifacts online

The National Historical Museum of Sweden has created a website showcasing over 500 artifacts from many eras including the Viking Age.

Re-enactors test effectiveness of Viking weapons

How effective were Viking Age weapons? That's what members of Hurstwic, a Viking re-enactment group located in New England, wanted to find out using sharpened weapons and a pig carcass. (video)

Viking mice rejected Newfoundland

It appears that Viking mice, which traveled on ships with their human warrior companions, found Newfoundland mostly not to their liking, according to a new study evolutionary biologist Eleanor Jones in the journal BMC Evolutionary Biology.

Customary Law Before the Conquest

How were disputes settled in Anglo-Saxon England? Implications suggest there was a common law, but "...where had it come from and how had it developed?"

East Kingdom to host Anglo Saxon Coronation

Baron Steffan ap Kennydd of Silverwing, of the East Kingdom, reports that the April 14, 2012 Coronation of Kenric and Avelina will feature an authentic Anglo-Saxon ceremony.

"Young Warrior's" grave reveals links to Kyivan Rus king

National Geographic's website offers a slideshow of artifacts discovered recently in eastern Europe. Among them are the remains from a grave in Poland dubbed the "Young Warrior."

Viking Longship presentation at Toledo Museum of Art

"Dragons of the North: The World of Viking Longships" is the title of a presentation being given at the Museum of Art in Toledo, Ohio on March 16 at 7:30 pm. Admission is free.

Khazaria: the third superpower

In the 7th through 10th centuries, two super powers ruled Eastern Europe: Byzantium, "bulwark of Christendom in the east," and the Arab empire, but some historians name a third. Khazaria, a Jewish kingdom, played a crucial a part in the stemming of the Arab advance into Europe. (map)

Pierced skull leads to 1,000 year old murder mystery

As the saying goes, "Bows don't kill people, arrows do." Such seems to be the case for a burial in Galway, Ireland. Evidence of a shallow grave and an arrow found in the victim's skull has led researches to conclude that the man may have been murdered.

Viking silver "of national significance" found in England

Somewhere along the Cumbria-Lancashire border, a metal detector enthusiast named Darren Webster uncovered a simple lead pot, and out spilled a fortune in Viking silver. "That's when I noticed I'd found something of great importance," he said. (photo)

Five-year York Hungate dig comes to an end in December, 2011

Archaeologists are beginning to pack up their tools five years after the excavation of York, England's Hungate dig began. In 2012, the York Archaeological Trust will turn the 2,500 sq m (26,900 sq ft) excavation over to developers for a modern housing project.

Viking treasures to be displayed in Yorkshire, England

In 2007, metal detectorists David and Andrew Whelan hit the jackpot when they discovered a huge hoard of Viking treasure in a field north of Harrogate, England. Now the Vale of York Viking Hoard will return to Harrogate for an exhibition at the Mercer Art Gallery.

Viking boat burial found in Scotland

An intact Viking boat burial has been found in the highlands of Scotland, the first burial of its kind found on the UK mainland. The artifacts found at the site indicate the man buried there may have been a high ranking warrior.

Professor investigates newly-discovered Missouri runestone

Dr. James Frankki, of Sam Houston State University, has studied the Kensington Runestone in Minnesota and the Heavener Runestone in Oklahoma. Now he is taking look at a recently-discovered stone in Missouri.

Churches in Sudan shed light on saints and pilgrims

A series of well-preserved medieval churches in central Sudan are giving researchers new information into the world of medieval pilgrimages and veneration. Inscriptions at one site show that pilgrims came from as far away as Catalonia.

Chinese archaeological excavation gives insight into Liao dynasty

For the first time, Chinese archaeologists are getting the opportunity to mount a large-scale investigation of the Upper Capital of the Liao dynasty. The first structure excavated was the Qiande Gate of the royal city.

Viking boat burial found in Scotland

An intact Viking boat burial has been found in the highlands of Scotland, the first burial of its kind found on the UK mainland. The artifacts found at the site indicate the man buried there may have been a high-ranking warrior.

Making a Finnish Viking dress

Satu Hovi offers techniques for creating a Finnish Viking dress on her website. The article includes research on the Eura dress and her replica from Luistari cemetery in Eura, grave 56.

Viking women on the move

The discovery of the graves of Norse women in eastern England has now led scholars to believe that Viking women emigrated earlier than once believed. Research on 14 Norse graves showed that six of the graves contained the remains of women, some armed with sword and shield.

The mystery of the medieval tunnels

Hundreds of narrow tunnels called "Erdstalls" can be found throughout the Bavarian region of Germany and Austria. While most experts agree that they are medieval, no one knows why they were built or how they were used. This has led to the Erstalls being called "Central Europe's last great mystery."

"Magnificent" finds at Perperikon

Bulgaria's top archeologist, Prof. Nikolay Ovcharov, has been happy to announce the discovery of incredible finds at the Thracian rock sanctuary Perperikon in southern Bulgaria, including a "magnificent bronze cross from the 10th – 11th century."

Walters Art Museum features digitized Islamic manuscripts

The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, Maryland has begun a project to digitize its collection of Islamic manuscripts. A gallery of images, including covers and bindings, is available on the museum's website.

9th and 10th century Viking coins found in Cumbria, England

A hoard of over 90 silver Viking coins dating to the 9th and 10th centuries was discovered recently by a metal detectorist near Furness, England. (photo)

Bayeux celebrates founding of Normandy

This will be a big year for the town of Bayeux in Normandy, France, when it celebrates the 1100th birthday of the French province of Normandy. The town's 25th annual Medieval Fair will take place July 1-3, 2011, and will celebrate all things Norman.

Preslav History Museum receives model of 10th century capital

Retired Bulgarian veterinarian Hristo Antonov has given a unique gift to his hometown, Veliki Preslav: a scale model of the city, the capital of the First Bulgarian Empire in the 10th century. (photo)

All Saints Church might be site of Anglo-Saxon coronations

A team of researchers from London's Kingston University may have located the site of as many as seven 10th century Anglo-Saxon kings including Athelstan and Ethelred the Unready. All Saints Church is located near Westminister Abbey.

10th century graves found in Hungary

The Medieval Hungary blog reports that three 10th century graves have been discovered near Pest, Hungary, one of which belonged to a high-ranking male. (photo)