Nautical

Shipbuilding, boat making, sailing, navigation, and related pursuits

Santa Maria found?

“All the geographical, underwater topography and archaeological evidence strongly suggests that this wreck is Columbus’ famous flagship, the Santa Maria,” said underwater archaeologist Barry Clifford about the discovery of what may be the Santa Maria, Christopher Columbus' flagship off the coast of Haiti.

And it even worked after dark!

In another argument against the barbarism of the Vikings, researchers have discovered that a small compass could have worked with other tools, such as a pair of crystals and a flat, wooden slab, to navigate when the sun was low in the sky or even below the horizon.

Candelabra might be key to medieval Spanish navigation

In 1970, a diver off the coast of Spain found a rare 10th century bronze candelabra. Since then, experts have studied the artifact as verification of a trade routes between Spanish cities and southern France, a topic about which little is known.

University of Southampton receives grant to study Roman ports

The European Research Council has awarded the University of Southampton a EU€2.49m (UK£2.1m) grant to study 31 roman ports in nine countries. The study will focus on ports in the Mediterranean region during the first two centuries CE.

SCAdian joins the crew for Pirates of The High Seas Festival

Marcel Hildebrand is a pirate, or at least he was recently when he participated in the Pirates of The High Seas Festival at Pier Park in Panama City Beach, Florida. Scott Carroll of the News Herald spoke to Hildebrand and Steve Bailey, director of the Convention and Visitors Bureau, when he visited the festival. (photo)

Remains of medieval boat found near Loddon, England

Archaeologist Heather Wallis is excited about the "particularly significant" discovery of a boat dating from between 1400 and 1600 CE during excavations of a drainage dyke near near Loddon, England. (photo)

Double Viking ship burial discovered in Estonia

A team of workers laying electrical cable through the village of Salme on the island of Saaremaa in Estonia were stunned to stumble across a early Viking era ship burial containing the remains of warriors and their possessions. More extraordinary was the discovery of a second, larger ship a mere 30m (98ft) from the other.

Wrecked merchant ship salvaged off coast of Vietnam

After five long months of battling sand and seawater off the coast of the Binh Son district in Vietnam, experts have recovered a wealth of 14th century artifacts from a shipwreck, possibly associated with the silk and pottery road.

The Mary Rose sails again in her new home

More than 30 years after the Mary Rose was pulled from the Solent, the ship continues to delight and educate both scholars and visitors to her new museum. In her new home, the Mary Rose can be viewed through three-story glass walls which display the interior of the ship, complete with dim lighting and "and groaning sounds of the sea outside." Eleanor Williams of BBC News has a feature story.

Photos of the Mary Rose

CNN goes inside the new Mary Rose museum in Portsmouth, England. The Mary Rose was a warship that sank in 1545 during a battle with the French.

Bored Viking Carved Outline of His Foot on Ship Deck

Two foot outlines, a right and a left, were recently noticed on removable deck planking on the Viking Gokstad Ship.

Detailed map created of underwater town in England

Archaeologists have created a detailed map of the medieval port city of Dunwich, dubbed "Britain's Atlantis" because it sank into the sea centuries ago.  Using both high-tech imaging and historic research, archaeologists have been able to map out the town boundaries, streets, and even identify individual buildings.

Wasaga under Siege and Sails on the St. Mary seek re-enactors

Building on the huge success of past Wasaga under Siege events, the Historic Military Establishment of Upper Canada in partnership with the Town of Wasaga Beach, Ontario Parks, Town of Collingwood and Nancy Island Historic Site look forward to hosting you once again from August 16th to the 18th, 2013.

New Exhibitions Centre to host Viking ship at British Museum

The British Museum will introduce the world to its new World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre with its premiere exhibit focusing on Vikings, and will include the largest known Viking ship. In addition to exhibit space, the UK£135 million project, scheduled to open in March 2014, will provide research, testing, conservation and storage space. (photo)

Mary Rose cannonballs early examples of armour-piercing rounds

The Mary Rose, the flagship of Henry VIII found on the ocean floor off the south coast of England, may once again change English history. Scientists studying cannonballs discovered on the ship have found them to be armor-piercing, a technology believed to have been created in the 18th century. (photos)

"Lizzy" may have belonged to Sir Walter Raleigh

Shipwreck diver Todd Stevens hopes he has found a gem at the bottom of the ocean near the Isles of Scilly in the form of the Lizzy, a shipwreck which may have belonged to Sir Walter Raleigh. Raleigh lost a ship, the Flying Joan, in the area in 1617.

Pondering Ponce de León

The State of Florida is celebrating its 500th birthday, including debates about the exploration of Juan Ponce de León, who landed on the peninsula on April 2, 1513. St. Augustine is the traditional site of the landing, but historian Douglas Peck believes otherwise.

Generous donors complete funding for the Mary Rose Museum

The final UK£35,000 needed to complete the Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth, England's Historic Dockyard has been raised thanks to a plea by the Mary Rose Trust. Museum officials are "putting the finishing touches" on the museum's interior, including filling cases with artifacts receoved from Henry VIII's flagship. (photo)

Tudor Armor-Piercing Cannonballs?

Cannonballs recovered from the Mary Rose wreck in England have been shown to contain iron cores, allowing the cannons to punch the shot through enemy vessels.

Did "Solarsteinn" lead Vikings west?

Experts have long speculated that a Norse Solarsteinn, or sunstone, was used to help Viking mariners find their way west through cloudy weather, and the discovery of such an artifact on a sunken, 16th century English warship may prove it.

17th-Century Swedish Warships Uncovered

Low water in Stockholm's harbor reveals the outline of two sunken warships believed to be from the 17th century.

1812 event seeking re-enactors

David J. Brunelle, Co-ordinator Historical Displays/Exhibits for Tall Ships 1812 in Midland and Penetanguishene Ontario is seeking re-enactors, artisans, entertainers, and historical displays for the event to be held August 24-25, 2013.

Canada's Oldest Shipwreck to be Replicated

A 16th-century Basque whaling galleon, the San Juan, will be re-constructed full-scale and seaworthy.

Viking troop transport to go on display at the British Museum

The Roskilde 6, the largest Viking long ship ever found, is traveling to England, not to loot and pillage, but to educate, 1,000 years after it carried troops for King Canute of Denmark. The warship wil be displayed by the British Museum in 2014.

[ATL] Tourney of Manannan mac Lir

Cold winds and snow may dominate the Northern reaches of our fair Kingdom, but here in the South, winter means camellias and time to fight for the Broach of Manannan. Join us for an exciting weekend of fighting, feasting and revelry as we celebrate the Celtic god of the sea!

"World's biggest shipwreck collection" revealed under Bosphorus

Since 2006, construction workers in Istanbul have worked along with archaeologists to uncover layer after layer of Byzantine history buried beneath the city and the Bosphorus Strait. Now the transit and tunnel project has revealed the "world's biggest shipwreck collection ever found."

The elite archers of the Mary Rose

Scientists from the University of Swansea have concluded that among those lost with the sinking of the Mary Rose, King Henry VIII's flagship, in 1545, were elite longbowmen. The conclusion was made after the study of over 100 skeletons found on the remains of the ship.

Raising of Mary Rose marked

Tudor archers with longbows marked the 30th anniversary of the raising of Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose, from the floor of the Solent. The BBC celebrated the occasion with a short video.

US government determines Drake landed at Point Reyes, California

Apparently fed up with four centuries of sqabbling, US Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar has designated the Point Reyes Peninsula, north of San Francisco, in Marin County, California, as the site where Sir Francis Drake came ashore and claimed the land for England.

Archaeologists hope to recover medieval shipwreck in the Danube

The blue Danube's not-very-blue waters are a hindrance to Hungarian archaeologists seeking to investigate a newly-discovered medieval shipwreck in the river 18 miles north of Budapest. The Danube connected much of Europe in the Middle Ages, but was hazardous to navigate.