901 CE to 1000 CE

Discover the art of the Song Dynasty at the Freer/Sackler Gallery

The Freer/Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution presents an exhibition of Chinese landscape painting from the 10th through 13th centuries entitled Style in Chinese Landscape Painting: The Song Legacy, May 17–October 26, 2014.

The Muwashshaha of al-Andalus research online

In a recent issue of the Falcon Banner, the news magazine of the Kingdom of Calontir, HE Qadiya Catalina de Arazuri shares her research for a Kingdom A&S entry: The Muwashshaha of al-Andalus.

Tolkien's Beowulf to be published for the first time

British professor and author JRR Tolkien is best known for his works The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, but now a deal has been made to publish the beloved storyteller's translation of the Old English poem Beowulf, complete with commentary.

"Clothing of al-Andalus" research paper

In a recent edition of the Falcon Banner, the online news magazine for the Kingdom of Calontir, HE Qadiya Catalina de Arazuri shares her research for the recent Kingdom A&S event on Clothing of al-Andalus.

Candelabra might be key to medieval Spanish navigation

In 1970, a diver off the coast of Spain found a rare 10th century bronze candelabra. Since then, experts have studied the artifact as verification of a trade routes between Spanish cities and southern France, a topic about which little is known.

Vikings gather for Ragnarok

How did you spend Ragnarok? If you are British, you might have celebrated at the JORVIK Viking Festival where warriors fought the Norse gods in an epic battle. Festival director Danielle Daglan spoke with NPR's All Thing's Considered about the event. (podcast)

Medieval superpowers of the Swahili Coast

Great civilizations of the Middle Ages were not located solely in Europe or Asia. Some of the world superpowers grew up along the coasts of Africa. In a feature article for i09, Annalee Newitz takes a look Songo Mnara, a city that thrived from the 10th to 15th centuries. (photos)

Raising a horn with the Vikings

For centuries, the Norse used animal horns as drinking vessels, many of which had decorative metal terminals and mounts. Proof of this has been found in grave sites, although the actual horns have long decayed. A new book by Vivian Etting entitled The Story of the Drinking Horn – Drinking Culture in Scandinavia during the Middle Ages tells the long story of the custom. (photos)

Symposium scheduled to pinpoint location of Battle of Brunanburh

In 937, a deciding battle was fought which changed the course of British history forever. The Battle of Brunanburh, one of the UK's bloodiest, was fought between the Scots and the Saxons, establishing England's identity. Unfortunately, no one knows where the battle took place.

Spanish medieval vineyard study opens "window to the past"

In the 10th century, Zaballa, Spain was a quiet village that cultivated vineyards on terraces. Then the rich folks arrived in the form of a manor monastery which created a "highly significant rent-seeking system," and then a "veritable factory, a specialised estate in the hands of local lords who tried to obtain the maximum profits possible." The town was abandoned in the 15th century.

#Beow100

College students forced to read Beowulf be heartened! Welsh medievalist, Elaine Treharne, has brought social media to medieval Scandinavia with Beowulf in a Hundred Tweets. The work is available on her blog Text Technologies.

Viking trade connected with Persian and Byzantine Empires

A new study by Marianne Vedeler, Associate Professor at the Museum of Cultural History, University of Oslo, shows that Norwegian Vikings enjoyed a brisk silk trade with the Persian and Byzantine Empires. The study was based partially on silk fragments found In an Oseberg ship. (photo)

Weights important tool in Viking trade

Much of the trade during the Viking Age was international in nature, leading merchants to depend on the balance weight scale and its weights as an important tool. In Ireland, these weights were often made of small, decorative items, apparently broken off of larger objects, usually from churches or monasteries.

Lincoln Castle excavations yield interesting finds

Construction of a new museum to house a copy of the Magna Carta at Lincoln Castle in England has halted after the discovery of the remains of a church, human skeletons and other artifacts. Among the finds was a sarcophagus, believed to contains the bones of "somebody terribly important." (photos)

Laws of Hywel Dda online

Last year, the 14th century book, the Laws of Hywel Dda, was purchased at auction by the National Library of Wales and brought home after nearly 300 years in exile in the United States. Now the book is on display at the library in Aberystwyth, and available for all to see online.

Viking sword from Isle of Man on display

Showcased at the ongoing Heroes exhibition at the Jorvik Viking Centre in York are the fragments of a highly-decorated Viking sword, discovered in 2008 by metal detector enthusiasts Rob Farrer and Daniel Crowe on the Isle of Man. The sword dates to the 10th century. (photo)

Remains of Irish mother and children considered "significant"

Experts from the Caherconnell Archaeological School are pondering the discovery of the remains of a “45-year-old plus” woman" and two infants beneath the remains of the 10th century cashel (fort). The archaeologists believe that the remains belong to a wealthy family, possibly the local Gaelic rulers, the O’Loughlins.

Viking Shield: Viking Age replicas and gifts.

Viking Shield specializes in all your Viking needs. They offer a full range of weapons, clothing, armor, jewellry, games, feasting gear, and art.

Experts prepare to solve mystery of Lincoln Castle sarcophagus

During the reconstruction of Lincoln Castle in England, archaeologists discovered an elaborate, stone sarcophagus believed to date from the 10th century. Now plans are being made to open the tomb and discover who might lie inside.

Lost Welsh artifact found in stream

A chance stroll through a Welsh woods has led to the discovery of a long-lost medieval artifact. A rare 9th or 10th century inscribed stone was spotted by archaeologists Nikki Vousden and Roderick Bale in a stream near St Sulien’s Church in Silian, Wales. (photo)

"Nerdy" Danish teen finds Viking hoard

Friends of Danish teenager Michael Stokbro Larsen call him "nerdy," but the 16-year-old had the last laugh recently when he discovered a hoard of 365 artifacts from the Viking era including 60 coins bearing the imprint of King Harald Bluetooth. (photos)

Now in English: Cookbook From Archaeological Studies in Northern and Central Europe

Looking for really historical documentation for cooking? A Culinary Journey Through Time, published by Communicating Culture, is now available in English, German and Danish. The book is the "first ever cookbook based on archaeological finds." Jeppe Wojcik of ScienceNordic has a review.

Stone from medieval church found in Welsh stream

An archeologist taking a walk in the woods discovered an inscribed stone that likely belonged to a nearby medieval church in Wales.  The decoration on the stone dates to the 9th or 10th century. The stone features an unusual cross only seen in two other stones.

"Exciting" find may point to Anglo-Saxon monastery

Work on the heating system of St Hilda’s Church, on Hartlepool’s Headland in England, has unearthed an Anglo Saxon grave, leading experts to believe that the church was constructed over site of St Hilda’s Anglo-Saxon monastery. Dr Steve Sherlock, of Tees Archaeology, said: “It’s an exciting thing."

Mathematics solves mystery of Viking craftsmanship

Historians and craftsmen have long pondered the absolute regularity of Viking jewelry made from twisted rods of gold and silver, but a new theory by Kasper Olsen and Jakob Bohr at the Technical University of Denmark may have solved the puzzle: mathematics.

Call for papers on Viking Age Culture

The Annual IMR Postgraduate Conference at the University of Nottingham in England is calling for papers to be presented at its conference to be held July 5, 2013. The deadline for submission is April 1, 2013

"Vikings" comes to History Channel March 3, 2013

On March 3, 2013, Vikings will sail onto television screens in a "nine-part drama series from Michael Hirst, creator of The Tudors." The series will focus on the exploits of Ragnar Lothbrok and his followers, complete with "dynamic displays of superherolike derring-do and physical stamina."

How To Forge A Helmet

How To Forge A Helmet is a step-by-step guide for making your own Viking-Age Spangenhelm.  It is a Kindle Book on Amazon, written by Armourer Joe Piela aka Gijchar of The Lonely Mountain Forge.  Approximately 24 pages long, this book is illustrated with 19 photos, including 1 of the pattern used to make the helmet.

The forging of Frankish swords

In a scholarly paper, an abstract of which was published recently at Medievalists.net, K.F. Werner examines techniques for forging Frankish swords from 700-1000 CE. Werner disputes the generally-accepted techniques.

Norfolk metal detectorist finds declared treasure

Several objects dating to the Middle Ages have been declared treasure by the Norfolk Historic Environment Services, including a 6th century brooch, an Anglo-Saxon sword belt mount, and a copper alloy jetton converted to a brooch. (photos)