801 CE to 900 CE

9th century Viking fortress found in Ireland

Eamonn Kelly, Keeper of Antiquities with the National Museum of Ireland, reports that after years of research the Viking fortress of Linn Duachaill has been located 45 miles north of Dublin.

Sherwood "thing" to be investigated

Five years ago, local archaeologists discovered a thing, an open-air Viking meeting place, on Hanger Hill in Sherwood Forest, England. Now the experts are moving in for an official survey.

Northumberland coal mine hides Anglo Saxon village

"The surface mine at Shotton has given us the first direct evidence of Anglo-Saxon settlement in this part of the county and has confirmed its potential for making important archaeological discoveries," said Karen Derham, Northumberland County Council Assistant County Archaeologist about the recent discovery of an Anglo-Saxon settlement.

Did Scots beat Norse to Iceland?

New research by experts from Bangor University in Wales may show that the Vikings were not the first to reach Iceland. The first may have been Irish monks from the Scottish islands who travled there 70 years before their Nordic neighbors.

Mongol history on Internet Archive

The Internet Archive has created a facsimile of the book History of the Mongols from the 9th to the 19th century by Major-General Sir A Cunningham. The nearly 800-page volume can be read as a book online.

Viking necklace found in cave a mystery

Archaeologists are puzzled over the spring 2010 discovery of a rare 9th century Viking necklace consisting of "71 glass beads covered with gold foil." The necklace was discovered during an excavation of Glencurran Cave in the Burren National Park. (photo)

Vikings go on "Online Tour"

The British Museum offers a series of Online Tours featuring photos and text describing artifacts from different eras. One of the most interesting is the Viking Age with closeup photos of such interesting objects as an antler comb in a case.

Rarely-seen 9th century carpet mosaic displayed briefly in Jericho

In honor of the 10,000th birthday of the city of Jericho, officials gave visitors a rare glimpse of a 1,200-year-old carpet mosaic measuring nearly 900 square meters (9,700 square feet) which once graced the floor of the main bath house of an Islamic palace. (photo)

Reading grave may hold medieval nun

Archaeologists working on a site next to Reading Minster in England have uncovered what they believe is the grave of a medieval nun, possibly dating to Saxon times.

Siberian mystery

On an island in the middle of a remote lake in Siberia, not far from the Mongolian border, lies the fortress of Por-Bajin. Por-Bajin is an archaeological site that dates to the 8th or 9th century. Its walls enclose 7 acres (2.8 hectares), a maze of about 30 buildings.

Anglo-Saxon ring centerpiece of BBC archaeology program

An exceptional gold ring, sporting "four beasts' heads with inlaid blue and yellow glass eyes" will be featured on a new BBC program Digging for Britain, focussing on Bristol, England and Berkeley Castle. (photo)

Ancient Bulgarian burial mound found

Archaeologists have unearthed a burial mound they suspect belongs to pre-Christian Bulgars of the Pliska period. Little is known about the people of this time and place.

Rotunda from the Great Moravian Empire found in Czech Republic

Pohansko, in the South Moravian region of the Czech Republic, translates as "Pagan Place," but archaeologists have discovered the remains of a rotunda as part of a 9th century church.

Bard to perform Beowulf in Berkeley

October 26-30, 2010 in Berkeley, CA, medievalist and early music specialist Benjamin Bagby will perform the epic saga of Beowulf. His performance will be accompanied by Anglo-Saxon harp.

9th century Byzantine monastic complex found in Turkey

At first, experts thought they had discovered a 9th century Islamic building, but evidence concluded that Küçükyalı Arkeopark, a large archaeological area on the Asian side of Istanbul, is the only surviving Byzantine monastic complex from 9th-century Constantinople.

Experts debate meaning of symbols on Pictish stones

The debate continues among archeologists and linguists over the symbols on over 200 carved stones dating to the time of the Picts in Scotland. Archeologists feel that the carvings are "symbolic markings that communicated information."

Viking "thunderstones" identified in graves

Archaeologists have long wondered about the inclusion of "thunderstones"—fist-size stone tools resembling the Norse god Thor's hammerhead -- in Viking graves. New research may show that the stones were considered good-luck talismans. (photo)

Iceland's early settlers cause scholarly debate

Icelandic scholars are still debating who the country's first settlers actually were. Tradition states that Ingólfur and Hjörleifur were the first settlers, but new evidence may show that 870, the date of their arrival, may not be correct.

Drinking pot helps date 9th century town

Experts from Leicester University in England recently used the shards of a pottery drinking pot to date the building of fortifications for the town of Wallingford to the late 9th century. They believe the walls were built to protect against Viking raids.

"Light of the Sufis" at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts

Now through August 8, 2010, the Houston Museum of Fine Arts will host Light of the Sufis: The Mystical Arts of Islam, an exhibit that "focuses on some of the most important Sufi ideas and practices that found expression through the arts of the Islamic world."

Viking clothing bright and provocative says Swedish expert

Historical films and fiction have always depicted the Norse as dour fellows, dressed in earthtones and furs, but new evidence seems to show otherwise.

Sackler Gallery to present "Gods of Angkor"

The Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. will host Gods of Angkor: Bronzes from the National Museum of Cambodia, "the first international exhibition to focus specifically on the skills and achievements of Khmer bronze casters," May 15, 2010 through January 23, 2011.

International Vinland Seminar to take place in Chicago

Officials have announced that the International Vinland-seminar,  "a three day event dedicated to the Norse discovery of America and Scandinavian Viking Culture," will take place in Chicago, IL October 15-17, 2010 at North Park University.

Mayan History Preserved in Floors

Maya commoners of their Classic Period --  "illiterate farmers, builders and servants" -- preserved their history by burying their old possesions in the floors of newly built homes. 

Rare 9th century Viking necklace found in Ireland

Archaeologists working in Glencurran Cave in Ireland have discovered a "stunning piece of jewellery," a Viking necklace of glass and gold foil beads. (photo)

Jewel of Muscat sails

1200 years ago, Arab ships sailed the Indian Ocean. Now, centuries later, the Jewel of Muscat, a replica of a 9th century ship, built in Oman as a gift to Singapore, sails again. Her 10-day journey is chonicled in photos by the BBC.

International Vinland-seminar

We are pleased to announce the International Vinland-seminar in Chicago, a three day event dedicated to the Norse discovery of America and Scandinavian Viking Culture, 15th – 17th October 2010.

Saxon artifact puzzles experts

Microscopes, X-rays and CAT scans have, so far, been used to identify a recent discovery of a Saxon object from an archaeological dig at The Meads in Kent, with no results. The circular silver, bronze and wooden disk is believed to be a mount, but no one is sure. (photos)

Climate cause of tough times for Norse settlers

New geochemical research by the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada shows that Norse settlers in 9th century Greenland and Iceland faced enormous challenges. The study followed temperature changes through analysis of mollusk shells.

Debate over Initial Settlement of Iceland

Who were the first European settlers to come to Iceland? Were they truly Ingólfur Arnarson his wife Hallgerdur Fródadóttir, as told in Íslendingabók (Book of Icelanders)?