801 CE to 900 CE

Help identify the Staffordshire Hoard "mystery object"

It's beautiful, but what is it? Archaeologists are asking that question about three gold and silver pieces from the Staffordshire Hoard that fit together. Guesses include a saddle fitting and the decorative terminal to a parchment scroll. (photos)

99 Danish thanes

For those old enough to have grooved to German popstar Nena's 99 Luftballoons, this video will make your day. Nena showcases her bardic chops with a retelling of Beowulf to the tune of her signature song.

Viking settlement discovered beneath market square in Dublin

Arcaheologists have discovered the remains of a Viking settlement beneath Temple Bar, the cultural area of Dublin. Originally on an island, the settlement is believed to have been destroyed by floods in the 10th or 11th century. (photos)

Churches in Sudan shed light on saints and pilgrims

A series of well-preserved medieval churches in central Sudan are giving researchers new information into the world of medieval pilgrimages and veneration. Inscriptions at one site show that pilgrims came from as far away as Catalonia.

Nat Geo to explore Staffordshire gold

On Monday November 7, 2011, the National Geographic Channel will present two, hour-long programs on the Staffordshire Hoard, the Viking treasure discovered in 2010 in England. The programs are scheduled for 8:00 and 9:00 p.m. (EST).

Archaeology meets folklore in documentary

Filmmakers Davide Marco Zori and Jesse Byock from the UCLA Archaeology Department explore "whether oral and written histories can help us understand the relics of the past" in The Saga of a Viking Age Longhouse in Iceland.

Important Viking site in Ireland confirmed

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Viking village in Louth County, Ireland are calling it "one of the most important Viking sites in the world." The site is believed to be where the Vikings brought their long ships for wintering and repair.

Saxon cemetery may mark town of Hamwick

Excavations at a housing project in Southampton, England have uncovered what experts believe is the earliest cemetery for the Saxon town of Hamwick. Nine skeletons were discovered which are believed to date from the 7th through 9th centuries.

9th and 10th century Viking coins found in Cumbria, England

A hoard of over 90 silver Viking coins dating to the 9th and 10th centuries was discovered recently by a metal detectorist near Furness, England. (photo)

Fadden More Psalter on display in Dublin

In 2006, a group of turf cutters working in a bog in Tipperary discovered a vellum and leather psalter dating to the 9th century. Now, for the first time, the public will have the opportunity to see the Fadden More Psalter now on display at the National Museum in Dublin.

Staffordshire Hoard environmental archaeology paper available online

The Portable Antiquities Scheme blog has posted a new paper on "the potential of environmental archaeology" in regard to the Staffordshire Hoard discovered in 2009 near Staffordshire England.

Smithsonian exhibit sparks controversy

A display of 9th century Chinese pottery, discovered in 1998 in the wreck of an Arabic ship near Indonesia, has sparked controvery in the archaeological community. Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures and Monsoon Winds, was scheduled to be exhibited at Washington's Smithsonian Institution.

Early English law refelcts Anglo-Saxon agrarian heritage

According to an article by ObiterJ on the Legalweek.com website, Our legal heritage, part 1: early times and the Anglo-Saxon period, much of English law is based on legal traditions passed down through history from Anglo-Saxon times.

Grants and donations will keep archaeological treasures in the UK

Grants from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund charity, as well as public donations, will keep recent archaeological treasures in the United Kingdom. Funds of over UK£1 million will allow such items as a hoard of Roman coins and four gold Iron Age torcs to be acquired by local museums.

What women's brooches tell us about Anglo-Saxon England

On the blog, A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe, Jonathan Jarrett offers a review of a paper by Jane Kershaw entitled New Insights on the Viking Settlement of England: the Small Finds Evidence, presented to the Institute of Historical Research Earlier Middle Ages seminar on 9 February, 2011.

Late Roman graves discovered in Canterbury

Archaeologists have discovered a cemetery, dating to the late Roman period, is the St. Dunstan's area of Canterbury, England. They believe, due to the placement of the bodies and lack of grave goods, that the burials were Christian.

Stone Age artifacts revered by Vikings

When archaeologists first unearthed Viking graves and ship burials, they dismissed the importance of Stone Age artfacts in much later burials. Now researchers are taking another look, one that seems to suggest the importance of "antiques" in Viking life.

Step back in time to Birka

When archaeologists excavated the Viking village of Birka near Stockholm, Sweden, they never imagined that filmmakers Mikael Agaton and Lars Rengfelt would make it possible to walk through the town as it was in the Middle Ages.

English jeweler proves love for craft of the Middle Ages

Jamie Hall, an apprentice jeweller from Derby, England, has something to prove. He wants to show that he is a really good jewelry-maker, one who can forego the technology of the present for the techniques of the past, specifically the early Middle Ages.

Staffordshire Hoard sheds light on Anglo-Saxon military

Now that parts of the Staffordshire Hoard are on display, scholars are pondering the meaning of the discovery. Unlike most finds, the Hoard seems to be made up of only military parephernalia. (video)

Vikings live on in Northwest England

A team of British researchers has recently concluded that Vikings are "alive and well and living in the North West of England." The results of their study have been published in a new book, Viking DNA: The Wirral and West Lancashire Project.

9th century Viking fortress found in Ireland

Eamonn Kelly, Keeper of Antiquities with the National Museum of Ireland, reports that after years of research the Viking fortress of Linn Duachaill has been located 45 miles north of Dublin.

Sherwood "thing" to be investigated

Five years ago, local archaeologists discovered a thing, an open-air Viking meeting place, on Hanger Hill in Sherwood Forest, England. Now the experts are moving in for an official survey.

Northumberland coal mine hides Anglo Saxon village

"The surface mine at Shotton has given us the first direct evidence of Anglo-Saxon settlement in this part of the county and has confirmed its potential for making important archaeological discoveries," said Karen Derham, Northumberland County Council Assistant County Archaeologist about the recent discovery of an Anglo-Saxon settlement.

Did Scots beat Norse to Iceland?

New research by experts from Bangor University in Wales may show that the Vikings were not the first to reach Iceland. The first may have been Irish monks from the Scottish islands who travled there 70 years before their Nordic neighbors.

Mongol history on Internet Archive

The Internet Archive has created a facsimile of the book History of the Mongols from the 9th to the 19th century by Major-General Sir A Cunningham. The nearly 800-page volume can be read as a book online.

Viking necklace found in cave a mystery

Archaeologists are puzzled over the spring 2010 discovery of a rare 9th century Viking necklace consisting of "71 glass beads covered with gold foil." The necklace was discovered during an excavation of Glencurran Cave in the Burren National Park. (photo)

Vikings go on "Online Tour"

The British Museum offers a series of Online Tours featuring photos and text describing artifacts from different eras. One of the most interesting is the Viking Age with closeup photos of such interesting objects as an antler comb in a case.

Rarely-seen 9th century carpet mosaic displayed briefly in Jericho

In honor of the 10,000th birthday of the city of Jericho, officials gave visitors a rare glimpse of a 1,200-year-old carpet mosaic measuring nearly 900 square meters (9,700 square feet) which once graced the floor of the main bath house of an Islamic palace. (photo)

Reading grave may hold medieval nun

Archaeologists working on a site next to Reading Minster in England have uncovered what they believe is the grave of a medieval nun, possibly dating to Saxon times.