801 CE to 900 CE

Scotland's first bullaun stone discovered on Isle of Canna

Scottish archeaologists are excited about the discovery of a bullaun or "cursing stone" linked to an early Christian cross on the Isle of Canna. The small, round stone, marked with a cross, dates to around 800 CE. (photo)

Ancient Arabic manuscripts reveal abnormal weather patterns

Modern scientists hope to study global weather patterns with the help of ancient scholars. Using writings from 9th and 10th century Iraq, a team of scientists from the Universidad de Extremadura hope to learn about climate change by comparing ancient and modern data.

Medieval monastery town to be built in Germany

A team of researchers and historians have begun a decades-long project to build a Carolingian monastery town near Messkirch, Germany using only techniques and materials from the 9th century. (photos)

Anglo-Saxon tools for the re-enactor

Daegrad Tools in Sheffield, England offers a wide range of Anglo-Saxon tools and equipment, extensively researched, including knives, tools and crafting items such as spindles and looms. The website features close-ups of the tools.

The case for women Vikings

On her blog Bones Don't Lie, mortuary archaeologist Katy M. Meyers discusses proof of Viking women warriors in the 9th and 10th centuries in the form of swords found in female burial mounds. (photos)

Will linguistic research pinpoint 9th century battlefield?

Keith Briggs, a visiting research fellow in linguistics at the University of the West of England, believes he has discovered Hægelisdun, the site of the 869 CE battle between the East Anglians and the Vikings which led to the death of St Edmund. His research involves the use of linguistics.

Viking Longship presentation at Toledo Museum of Art

"Dragons of the North: The World of Viking Longships" is the title of a presentation being given at the Museum of Art in Toledo, Ohio on March 16 at 7:30 pm. Admission is free.

Grant awarded to search for Viking "court circle" in Sherwood Forest

Several years ago, the Friends of Thynghowe, an amateur history group, was instrumental in discovering a Viking Thing in England's Sherwood Forest. Now the group has received a grant to search a wider area.

Phantom Time Hypothesis wipes out 300 years of the Dark Ages

The debate among historians of the Middle Ages over the years 600–900 CE has come to a boil with the Phantom Time Hypothesis (PTH), a chronological theory that contends that the 300-year period was created by Holy Roman Emperor Otto III.

Silver coins reveal previously unknown Viking ruler

The coroner in Lancashire, England has declared a hoard of Viking silver "treasure." The hoard, discovered by a metal detector enthusiast, consists of 201 coins, including some identifying a previously unknown Viking ruler of northern England, as well as jewelry. (photo)

Japanese train yard reveals luxury lodgings

A site excavated at a train yard in Japan is thought to have been a facility that provided food and lodgings to Korean and Chinese enyoys. The facility is mentioned in ancient manuscripts and dates to the 8th or 9th century CE.

Pierced skull leads to 1,000 year old murder mystery

As the saying goes, "Bows don't kill people, arrows do." Such seems to be the case for a burial in Galway, Ireland. Evidence of a shallow grave and an arrow found in the victim's skull has led researches to conclude that the man may have been murdered.

Help identify the Staffordshire Hoard "mystery object"

It's beautiful, but what is it? Archaeologists are asking that question about three gold and silver pieces from the Staffordshire Hoard that fit together. Guesses include a saddle fitting and the decorative terminal to a parchment scroll. (photos)

99 Danish thanes

For those old enough to have grooved to German popstar Nena's 99 Luftballoons, this video will make your day. Nena showcases her bardic chops with a retelling of Beowulf to the tune of her signature song.

Viking settlement discovered beneath market square in Dublin

Arcaheologists have discovered the remains of a Viking settlement beneath Temple Bar, the cultural area of Dublin. Originally on an island, the settlement is believed to have been destroyed by floods in the 10th or 11th century. (photos)

Churches in Sudan shed light on saints and pilgrims

A series of well-preserved medieval churches in central Sudan are giving researchers new information into the world of medieval pilgrimages and veneration. Inscriptions at one site show that pilgrims came from as far away as Catalonia.

Nat Geo to explore Staffordshire gold

On Monday November 7, 2011, the National Geographic Channel will present two, hour-long programs on the Staffordshire Hoard, the Viking treasure discovered in 2010 in England. The programs are scheduled for 8:00 and 9:00 p.m. (EST).

Archaeology meets folklore in documentary

Filmmakers Davide Marco Zori and Jesse Byock from the UCLA Archaeology Department explore "whether oral and written histories can help us understand the relics of the past" in The Saga of a Viking Age Longhouse in Iceland.

Important Viking site in Ireland confirmed

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Viking village in Louth County, Ireland are calling it "one of the most important Viking sites in the world." The site is believed to be where the Vikings brought their long ships for wintering and repair.

Saxon cemetery may mark town of Hamwick

Excavations at a housing project in Southampton, England have uncovered what experts believe is the earliest cemetery for the Saxon town of Hamwick. Nine skeletons were discovered which are believed to date from the 7th through 9th centuries.

9th and 10th century Viking coins found in Cumbria, England

A hoard of over 90 silver Viking coins dating to the 9th and 10th centuries was discovered recently by a metal detectorist near Furness, England. (photo)

Fadden More Psalter on display in Dublin

In 2006, a group of turf cutters working in a bog in Tipperary discovered a vellum and leather psalter dating to the 9th century. Now, for the first time, the public will have the opportunity to see the Fadden More Psalter now on display at the National Museum in Dublin.

Staffordshire Hoard environmental archaeology paper available online

The Portable Antiquities Scheme blog has posted a new paper on "the potential of environmental archaeology" in regard to the Staffordshire Hoard discovered in 2009 near Staffordshire England.

Smithsonian exhibit sparks controversy

A display of 9th century Chinese pottery, discovered in 1998 in the wreck of an Arabic ship near Indonesia, has sparked controvery in the archaeological community. Shipwrecked: Tang Treasures and Monsoon Winds, was scheduled to be exhibited at Washington's Smithsonian Institution.

Early English law refelcts Anglo-Saxon agrarian heritage

According to an article by ObiterJ on the Legalweek.com website, Our legal heritage, part 1: early times and the Anglo-Saxon period, much of English law is based on legal traditions passed down through history from Anglo-Saxon times.

Grants and donations will keep archaeological treasures in the UK

Grants from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the Art Fund charity, as well as public donations, will keep recent archaeological treasures in the United Kingdom. Funds of over UK£1 million will allow such items as a hoard of Roman coins and four gold Iron Age torcs to be acquired by local museums.

What women's brooches tell us about Anglo-Saxon England

On the blog, A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe, Jonathan Jarrett offers a review of a paper by Jane Kershaw entitled New Insights on the Viking Settlement of England: the Small Finds Evidence, presented to the Institute of Historical Research Earlier Middle Ages seminar on 9 February, 2011.

Late Roman graves discovered in Canterbury

Archaeologists have discovered a cemetery, dating to the late Roman period, is the St. Dunstan's area of Canterbury, England. They believe, due to the placement of the bodies and lack of grave goods, that the burials were Christian.

Stone Age artifacts revered by Vikings

When archaeologists first unearthed Viking graves and ship burials, they dismissed the importance of Stone Age artfacts in much later burials. Now researchers are taking another look, one that seems to suggest the importance of "antiques" in Viking life.

Step back in time to Birka

When archaeologists excavated the Viking village of Birka near Stockholm, Sweden, they never imagined that filmmakers Mikael Agaton and Lars Rengfelt would make it possible to walk through the town as it was in the Middle Ages.