Architecture and Construction

Anything related to the design or construction of buildings, roads, aqueducts, etc.

Hadrian's Wall - a hike worth taking.

When he decided to walk the 84 miles of Hadrian's Wall across northern England, reporter Len Barcousky of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette wasn't sure what he was letting himself in for, but the experience left him feeling like a "king of the world."

Heating system confirms Korean settlement of Russian province

A large "ondol," under floor heating system, dating to the 10th century, was discovered recently at an excavation in the Russian town of Kraskino. The discovery confirms that the Russian maritime province was settled by Koreans.

Researchers investigate "ancient lighting"

A team of experts is investigating ancient lighting techniques to evaluate how artifacts would look in their original light. The result "is a warm, sumptuous glow, which the researchers describe as subtle and pleasant compared with the 'rough, almost unnatural' effect of modern lighting." (photo)

Wooden structure precursor of Hadrian's Wall

According to archaeologist Geoff Carter, the stone structure of Hadrian's Wall may not have been the first to cross northern England. Carter believes a wooden wall, spanning 117 km, was built first.

New excavations at Black Sea fortress

After a 6th century earthquake destroyed the town of Dionisopolis, Byzantine emperors built a stronghold at Balchik, overlooking the Black Sea. Now a new team of experts hope to reveal more secrets of the site.

High-res survey reveals Roman farming community

Recent high-resolution geophysical surveys of the Roman town of Venta Icenorum in Norfolk, England, show that the town may have included agricultural areas, a discovery that contradicts earlier theories of the town's dense population. (graphic)

Site of large Roman hospital found in Moravia

Once a part of a fortified complex, a Roman hospital, "described as the largest preserved site of its kind north of the Danube," has been found in South Moravia. The site dates to the 2nd century.

Roman streets uncovered in Plovdiv

Archaeologists working on a large Roman site in Plovdiv, Bulgaria have discovered two Roman-era streets and the home of a Roman nobleman.

Living the life of luxury at Pennsic 38

THL Rowena ni Dhonnchaidh has posted an album of photos taken at Pennsic 38 featuring "Lifestyles of the Pennsic Rich and Famous." The album, available on Photobucket, offers a tour of the "stately homes" of a number of Pennsic attendees.

10th century Icelandic cowshed discovered

Archaeologists have discovered a well-preserved cowshed dating to the 10th century on a farm near Keldudalur in Skagafjördur, Iceland.

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan a stately pleasure-dome decree

Marco Polo, in his travel notes, wrote of Kublai Khan's massive capital, Xanadu. Now Chinese archaeologists believe they can reconstruct a layout of the city. The basis for their claim is a three-month long excavation of Yuan Shangdu, which they think is the historic Xanadu.

Lost Knowledge: Timbrel vaulting

A look at the largely-lost Medieval art of timbrel vaulting structures and the related, more modern (late 19th century) system of interlocking terracotta tiles which create what are known as Guastavino domes, after their inventor, Rafael Guastavino.

The lost art of timbrel vaulting

In its "Lost Knowledge" column, Make: Online presents an article on the lost medieval art of timbrel vaulting, an architectural technique using a "system of interlocking terracotta tiles which create what are known as Guastavino domes, after their inventor, Rafael Guastavino." (photos and diagrams)

"One of the most important early medieval sites in Wales" threatened by development

The discovery of a tiny sword stud beneath a shop in Monmouth, Wales has archaeologists excited - and worried. The stud has led to the discovery of evidence of a 10th century Anglo Saxon settlement in the area, a discovery now threatened by commercial development.

600 Sq. Ft., 1,700 Year Roman Old Mosaic Revealed in Israel

Israeli archaeologists have uncovered for public view "one of the largest and best preserved mosaics ever found."

View Whitehall Roman bathhouse for last time

The community archaeological project at Nether Heyford in Northamptonshire, UK will face a bittersweet milestone on July 12, 2009 when the Roman bathhouse will be able to be viewed for the last time before being re-covered. While that building is being preserved for future study, others, such as the Roman villa, continue to be investigated.

The cost of Hadrian's Wall

In today's world of astronomical construction costs, what would it cost to build Hadrian's Wall? The British company Carillion thinks it knows.

Current Viroconium "only tip of the iceberg"

Experts from English Heritage have declared that excavations at Shropshire’s Wroxeter Roman City, Viroconium, have so far revealed "only the tip of the iceberg," and plan to uncover the rest of the city.

To see Roman France, go south

When asked the best way to view the Roman heritage of France, Patrick Périn, the director of the Musée des Antiquités Nationales replied, "Go South." That is what travel reporter Elaine Sciolino did to research her article for the New York Times. (photos)

Khukhragarh Fort excavations shed light on 12th century Indian empire

Archaeologists working in the Bero region of Jharkhand, India have discovered the remains of Khukhragarh Fort, a 12th century stronghold of the Nagvanshi rulers. The discovery was the first concrete evidence for the existence of the dynasty.

1st century Roman palace found in Romania

Romanian archaeologists are excited about the discovery of a Roman palace, dating to the time of Emperor Trajan, in the southwestern village of Zavoi. Experts believe that the structure was built during the first Dacian-Roman War of 101-102.

Roman vicus sheds light on the last days of Roman Britain

Archaeologists working on a Roman settlement near Bowes, England have discovered a vicus, an unplanned settlement on the outskirts of the fort dating to the 2nd to 3rd centuries, which would have been home to hundreds of people.

Roman road being destroyed by 4x4s

The last remnants of a Roman road from Wandlebury to Horseheath, England are being destroyed by trail bikers and 4x4 drivers who using it as a race track.

Dog Skeletons Indicate Medieval Custom of Sacrifice

A discovery of multiple buried dog skeletons in a medieval town outside Budapest suggests that the custom of animal sacrifice was much more widespread in early Christian Hungary than previously thought.

Medieval design could be eco-house of the future

Engineers and architects at Cambridge University have constructed a prototype "eco-house" based on a 600-year-old design. The plan uses a domed technique developed in Spain called "timbrel vaulting" which retains the sun's heat and cools naturally in the summer. (photo)

Today in the Middle Ages: April 15, 1489

Ottoman architect Koca Mi’mar Sinan Aga , usually referred to as Sinan, was born on April 15, 1489. His innovative approach was to transform the Ottoman civic and religious architecture of the Ottoman classical period.

Earthquake takes lives, damages treasures in central Italy

Tragedy struck central Italy April 7 when a 6.3 magnitude earthquake toppled ancient and modern buildings in the medieval city of L’Aquila. Over 200 people lost their lives, and the earthquake damaged nearly all the historic buildings of the town. (video)

Medieval and Renaissance Forum at Plymouth State University

Plymouth State University in Plymouth, New Hampshire will present its annual Medieval and Renaissance Forum April 24-25, 2009. This year's keynote speaker is Dr. Carole Levin, author of Dreaming the English Renaissance: Politics and Desire in Court and Culture.

Tunnel network found under Malta's capital

A series of tunnels, believed to have been constructed by the Knights of Malta, descendants of the Crusader knights, have been discovered beneath the Maltese capital of Valletta. Experts believe that the tunnels were built in the 16th or 17th centuries in defense of the city from Muslim attack.

Byzantine bathhouse excavation continues during rocket attacks

Archaeologists are working amidst rocket-fire to complete the excavation of a Byzantine village, complete with a large bathhouse, near Gaza in Israel. Because of the existence and size of the luxury bathhouse, experts believe that the area was inhabited by wealthy residents.