Architecture and Construction

Anything related to the design or construction of buildings, roads, aqueducts, etc.

13th century flood wall in England to be repaired

In a move that could only embarrass the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, a government agency in England has ordered repairs to a river levy that has started to fail...after 800 years.

Ancient Londinium revealed in London park

The remains of the "busy metropolis of Londinium" may lie beneath half a meter of the Duke of Northumberland's Syon Park, the proposed site of a lixury hotel. The Roman landscape was discovered by archaeologists before hotel construction began.

Tudor labyrinth revealed by Luftwaffe photo

In 1944, a Luftwaffe cameraman photographed a ruined house in Northamptonshire, but what was revealed in the photo was much more important. The house was surrounded by an elaborate garden containing a Tudor labyrinth, a symbol of the owner's Catholic faith. (photo)

‘Bringing Houses to Life’ project draws criticism of England's National Trust

In an effort to make British museum more accesible to visitors, the National Trust has created the Bringing Houses to Life project which employs costumed actors, opened up roped-off areas, and recreated historical scenes, all of which have brought criticism to the organization.

Wedding site of Pocahontas and John Rolfe located

Experts believe they have discovered the site of the church where Pocahontas married tobacco farmer John Rolfe in Jamestown, Virginia in 1614.

Inner courtyard discovered at Wakehurst Place

Excavations at Wakehurst Place, home of the Kew country garden in West Sussex, England, have revealed the existence of an Elizabethan-era south wing which would have completed an enclosed courtyard.

Tall al-Shir dig reveals centuries of construction

Workers at the Tall al-Shir archaeological dig in Syria have so far uncovered three layers of history dating back to the Roman and Greek eras. A recent find including walls from the late Byzantine period.

Nonesuch painting to be auctioned

No trace of Henry VIII's Nonesuch Palace remains except a rare 16th century watercolor by Joris Hoefnagel, and now that is to be auctioned by Christies. The watercolor is expected to bring as much as 1.2 million UK pounds (US$1.9 million).

Documenting the Luxury Arts: A photo archive by Genevra Kornbluth

Genevra Kornbluth's "Documenting the Luxury Arts" site has photos of artifacts and architecture from Roman to 20th century. Photos of the pre-17th century items include many not easily found elsewhere, including crystal and crystal intaglio pieces, ivory carvings, and game pieces (20-sided dice, anyone?).

Mona Lisa's childhood home discovered

Did the enigmatic smile of da Vinci's Mona Lisa hide sad memories of an impoverished childhood? A video clip from Discovery News looks at the childhood home of the famous model.

Trees threaten Roman wall in St. Albans

Sycamore trees are the culprits in damage done to the historic Roman wall in St. Albans, England. Built in the 3rd century, the wall is what remains of a five metres high and three metres wide wall, circling the city, with a walkway on top. (photo)

Rarely-seen 9th century carpet mosaic displayed briefly in Jericho

In honor of the 10,000th birthday of the city of Jericho, officials gave visitors a rare glimpse of a 1,200-year-old carpet mosaic measuring nearly 900 square meters (9,700 square feet) which once graced the floor of the main bath house of an Islamic palace. (photo)

12th century Royal Court possibly found in Abergwyngregyn

Archaeologists working on a site in Abergwyngregyn, North Wales may have discovered the remains of a Royal Court dating to the 12th century. The area has links to Prince Llewellyn.

Welsh students hope to find medieval Whitelands

Teacher Karl James Langford and his students are on a quest: to find the lost medieval village of Whitelands near Porthkerry in Wales.

Berryfield Mosaic removal and conservation underway

"The main trouble is getting it through the door," said Nick Barnfield, project conservator with Cliveden Conservation, about the removal of the Berryfield mosaic at Colchester Castle, once the dining room floor of a 2nd century Roman townhouse.

Fairy tale playhouses for the kid in all of us

Every child - and some adults - dreams of having his own fairy tale playhouse, castle or pirate ship. Bespoke Play Areas specialises in children's play equipment designed to inspire creative play.

16th century Scottish archway destroyed in vehicle crash

An historic, 16th century stone archway on the grounds of Scone Palace in Perthshire was destroyed recently when a van driven by a contractor crashed into it.

2nd century Roman waterwheel found in Cumbria

A team of volunteer archaeologists has discovered a rare Roman waterwheel dating to the first or second century C.E. near Cockermouth, an ancient market town in Cumbria, England. (photos)

Ancient winery found at Byzantine fortress

A two-room winery, dating from the time of the Byzantine Emperors Anastasius I (491-518 CE), and Justinian I (527-565 CE), has been discovered at the Byzantine fortress near the town of Byala on the Black Sea.

Terracotta finial may give insight into medieval London

A tiny fragment of the grandeur that was medieval London has been discovered on the bank of the Thames. A medieval terracotta roof finial, in the shape of an animal, dating to the 13th century, was found by an amateur archaeologist.

Archeologists find gate in Danevirke

Archeologists in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein are excited over the discovery of a five-meter (16 feet) wide portal through the Danevirke, a 30-kilometer (19-mile) stone wall built across Norhtern Germany by the Norse in the 8th century. (photos)

Rebuild of rebuild of Eleanor's Cross unveiled in London

In the late 13th century, Eleanor of Castile, wife of England's King Edward I died near Lincoln. In her memory, the king built a series of crosses at resting points along the road to London. Now London's own cross, under renovation for five years, has been unveiled.

Roman governor's villa fit for an emperor

When it was built in the 2nd century, Lullingstone villa was the height of luxury for its owner, Publius Helvius Pertinax, a former Roman Emperor and Governor of Britain. Now the site is one of the best examples of Roman villas in the country. (photos)

Archeological goldmine found during Sofia subway build

The construction of a new metro line in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, has unearthed some marvels including major sections of Serdica, the Roman city and vacation site for Constantine the Great.

French Gallo-Roman sanctuary is archaeologists' dream

Archaeologists working near the ancient site of Vindunum  (now Le Mans, France) have found an "exceptional discovery," a vast complex of temples dating to the first through third centuries C.E.

Hartlington Stones may have been large-scale bread oven

Archaeologists may have to revise their conclusions on the Hartlington Stones in the English Yorkshire Dales from medieval corn drying kiln to communal bread oven. (photo)

Saxon window found in England

A window, complete with working wood shutter, has been discovered during repairs to a church in Boxford, England. Stonework and mortar have helped date the window to before the Norman conquest of 1066.

New finds at Caerleon "totally unexpected"

Students learning to use geophysical equipment have discovered several large buildings at the Roman fortress of Caerleon in south Wales. Cardiff University's Peter Guest said the find was "totally unexpected."

"Remodeling" of Anglo Saxon Lincolnshire

Soon after the Norman invasion of England, William the Conqueror ordered the construction of a castle in the old Roman fort at Lincoln, England, casuing the destruction of over 100 Saxon homes. Now archaeologists have found their remains.

Skellig Michael fort may have pre-dated monastery

The precariously-perched UNESCO world heritage site Skellig Michael, in Kerry, Ireland, is known for housing monks from the 6th through 8th centuries, but new discoveries may prove that an earlier fort existed on the site.