Architecture and Construction

Anything related to the design or construction of buildings, roads, aqueducts, etc.

Henry VIII's Wine Cellar

Henry VIII's perfectly preserved wine cellar is underneath Britain's Ministry of Defence building - floating in a subterranean chamber.

The Lime and Ice Project seeks answers about 16th century mill

Who built the 16th century water mill recently discovered in North York Moors National Park? Archaeologists are looking for the answer among official documents after unearthing the complex, complete with millstones and the outlines of watercourses.

Tolkien-inspired "Hobbit House" graces Chester County, Pennsylvania

A devoted collector of J.R.R. Tolkien memorabilia, having spent thirty years accumulating a private collection, wanted an appropriate house to showcase the collection. Architect Peter Archer overcame surprising engineering challenges to bring the house to reality.

Eastgate House to become museum

Admirers of Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers (Westgate) and The Mystery of Edwin Drood (The Nun's House) will be gratified to know that Eastgate House in High Street in Rochester, Kent, England, is scheduled to be restored. (photo)

Recreating the Blue Boar Inn

A team of archaeologists and academics in Leicester, England have digitally recreated the Blue Boar Inn where Richard III spent the night before the battle of Bosworth, where he met his fate. The inn was demolished in the 19th century and is currently the site of a Travelodge. (video)

65 yards of influential Roman road revealed

A short stretch of Roman road in York, England may  have been a walkway for some of the city's most influential citizens, and "probably even witnessed the very first Christians on their way to worship,” according to the Dean of York, Vivienne Faull.

Art historians staggered by loss from Italian earthquakes

During the past few months, medieval and renaissance art and architecture in Italy have taken a pounding from earthquakes which devasted the country's mountain towns, killing over 20 people and damaging or destroying more than 2000 historic churches and buildings.

What made Rome great?

Evan Andrews of the History Channel online discusses the innovations that made Rome great in his article 10 Innovations That Built Ancient Rome.

"Epic parties" marked spectacular Anglo-Saxon feasting hall

1,300 years ago, a "spectacular Anglo-Saxon feasting hall" was abandoned in Kent, England. Recently a team of archaeologists from the University of Reading marked the end of their excavations of the site with a candlelight ceremony surrounding the building which knew so many "epic parties."

New book reveals Scotland's lost gardens

English spies in the employ of Henry VIII would never believe that their maps could lead to the re-discovery of forgotten and abandoned gardens in Scotland. Their maps, along with aerial photography, historic documents, and even poetry, were used by Marilyn Brown for her book Scotland's Lost Gardens.

Hampton Court - Rooftops and Stairs

Sixty-four photos in one album show Hampton Court from the vantage of the rooftops and 16 photos record various staircases in the Palace in the other album.

How the English changed the Danes

There are documents a plenty on how the Vikings influenced the culture of England, but a new study looks at ways that Danish Norse were influenced by the English they conquered. According to Ph.D candidate Marie Bønløkke Spejlborg, it was the English who inspired Danes to organise themselves into cities."

Volunteers encouraged to help excavate Roman bath house

Archaeologists from the Grampus Heritage team are encouraging volunteers to take part in excavations to uncover a Roman bath house at the Derventio site near Papcastle, England. “This is genuinely a once in a lifetime opportunity because I don’t believe you will see something like this again in my lifetime.," said Mark Graham, project manager.

Archaeologists explore Vindolanda's water system

In 1930, Prof Eric Birley first recorded the pipework for the water supply at the Roman fort Vindolanda in Northumberland, England. Recently his grandson, Dr Andrew Birley, continued the legacy by identifying the spring-head and piping system for the fort.

"Significant" archaeological find revealed by Cowgate fire

In 2002, a devastating fire badly damaged the World Heritage site of Cowgate in Edinburgh's Old Town, but the clouds of smoke has a silver lining with the recent discovery of street frontages and tenements dating to the 16th century beneath the fire site.

Early Byzantine fortress and settlement found in Bulgaria

An archaeological team led by archaeologist Ivan Hristov has discovered a 5th century Byzantine town and fortress on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast. Experts believe the town was destroyed by an Avar invasion which sealed the area in the way Vesuvius sealed Herculaneum.

Community unites to rebuild 13th century clocktower

In May 2012, disaster struck the small Italian town of Finale Emilia in the form of two powerful earthquakes which destroyed the town's 13th-century clock tower. Now teams of volunteers from across Italy are coming together to help reconstruct the historic Torre dei Modenesi. (photos)

"Oldest" Jewish toilet found in Cologne, Germany

“This is the window through which feces are going to get out” reads the Hebrew inscription on what experts believe may be the oldest Jewish toilet ever found. The inscription was discovered on a stone lintel of a 13th century house near the city's medieval synagogue.

16th century trader's house reconstructed in Wales

St Fagans: National History Museum near Cardiff, Wales is richer now with the addition of a 16th century Tudor building, meticulously rebuilt, and now open to the public. The trader's house was originally used for the storage of goods for sale in the busy port town.

Channel Islands' Roman fort "probably the best in Britain"

Archaeologists working on the oldest standing building in the Channel Islands, a small Roman fort, are pondering the possible decision to turn the building into a visitor center.

Photographer documents decline of Italian villas

Once the grand homes of Italian nobles in the Renaissance, the villas of northern Italy still hold hints of their grandeur. Photographer Thomas Jorion documented these lost treasures in a gallery show entitled Forgotten Palaces. (photos)

Unearthed Roman road changes historians' maps

The patrons of the Stockwell Arms, in Colchester, England, probably never dreamed that they were having a pint atop the remains of a 1st century Roman road. The road was revealed recently after reconstruction of the pub.

Robin Hood's grave up for sale

Long to own a real piece of English history? The Kirklees Estate, near Halifax, West Yorkshire, purported burial place of Robin Hood, is for sale for something over UK£7 million. The site includes several farmhouses, 750 acres of farmland and woods, and a medieval Cistercian priory.

Wolsey's Gate "tagged" with graffiti

Wolsey's Gate, a Tudor tower built by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey in Ipswich, England, was the subject of vandalism recently when the 16th century brickwork was covered by graffiti.

Early Shakespeare theater found

Archaeologists from Museum of London Archaeology report that they have discovered the remains of a playhouse where Willianm Shakespeare staged some of his earliest plays. The Curtain Theatre north of the river Thames in Shoreditch pre-dated the Globe.

Town councillor recruited to translate mysterious text

Workmen renovating a medieval house in St Katherine’s, England, have enlisted the help of a former mayor to translate the ancient text discovered on the ceiling. The writing is believed to be Latin.

Luxury home once birthplace of opera

Paolo and Gabriella Mazza of Florence, Italy combined a work project with a new home when they purchased La Camerata, as the 3,444-square-foot (320 square meters) theater, believed to have been designed by Renaissance architect Filippo Brunelleschi. (slideshow)

Stunning locations mark Morrocan Roman ruins

Most tourists of Roman sites rave about the beauty of Rome or Hadrian's Wall, but most ignore Roman Morocco. In an article for The Star Online, Paul Schemm looks at several Roman sites in Morocco.

"Historic" Byzantine site discovered in Israel

Israeli archeologists believe they may have discovered the site of a 6th century Byzantine church and stone quarry mentioned in a text by historian Procopius of Caesarea.

Restoration of famed "Gates of Paradise" complete after 33 years

Restoration is complete for Lorenzo Ghiberti's masterpiece, the bronze and gilt doors that he created for the Florence Baptistry in 1452. Michaelangelo called them the Gates of Paradise.