Architecture and Construction

Anything related to the design or construction of buildings, roads, aqueducts, etc.

Wigan, England once Roman Coccium?

Children from the Ince CE Primary School in Wigan, England are helping archaeologists from the Wigan Archaeological Society to investigate the remains of a Roman road in their town which once linked the village to Manchester.

Japan's Gosashi tomb opened to scholars

A 5th century royal Japanese tomb has been made accessible to scholars for research and study for the first time. Koji Takahashi, a Toyama University archaeologist, was one of the experts allowed into the Gosashi tomb, which "is revered as the resting place of Empress Jingu, the semi-legendary wife of the country's 14th emperor."

Nero's gate discovered in Cologne

Constructions workers at the site of Cologne, Germany's new metro line have discovered a Roman gate believed to have been built by the Emperor Nero and dating from the 1st century C.E.

Smoking ban leads to discovery of medieval artifact

A 14th century gravestone has been lying unnoticed as part of the wall of the Blacksmiths Arms in Mickleton, County Durham, England. One of the pub regulars, an archaeologist, spotted it low in the wall as he stood outside puffing his pipe, because he can no longer smoke inside the bar.

12th century campanile to be saved from fall

Experts are working to keep the 12th century bell-tower in St Mark's Square in Venice from tumbling over after a survey disclosed that the foundation was no longer supporting the structure.

"Magical" Irish towers

In an article on his blog, writer Philip Coppens discusses the "mysterious round Irish towers," an Irish medieval architectural phenomenon. The article is entitled Round towers: needles in magical landscape?

Time Team discovers link between Welsh and King Harald

In 2007 Channel Four's Time Team was permitted to excavate a field near the village of Portskewett in Wales and discovered what it believes is a Saxon hunting lodge built by King Harald one year before the Battle of Hastings.

Ancient Colchester South Gate discovered

Archaeologists believe that they have discovered part of the South gate of the Roman wall at Colchester, Britain's oldest Roman town. The wall was destroyed in 1818.

Archaeologists closer to discovering Scottish palace

Medieval texts have called the palace of Kenneth MacAlpine, the first king of a united Scotland, a stone building, but modern researchers believe it would have been wooden. Now recent discoveries lead the experts to think they may be close to zeroing in on the location.

Time Team finds ancient gate

The BBC's Time Team believe they have discovered the 'Great Gate' of Langthorne Abbey in West Ham, England. The Abbey itself may lie beneath rail lines.

Korean national treasure destroyed by fire

Police in Seoul, Korea believe arson was responsible for the destruction of a 600-year-old gate considered to be Korea's most important national treasure.

Viking sites proposed for UNESCO Heritage Sites

Several Viking Age sites around the Baltic Sea have been proposed as UNESCO Heritage Sites. The locations include Haithabu, a village in Germany, and the Dannevirke, a series of earthen walls.

Berlin slightly older than previously thought

An archaeological dig in downtown Berlin has uncovered evidence that the German capital is at least 45 years older than had previously been established.

Viking Age research CD-ROM to be available in April

Dan Carlson of the Viking History website has announced that a new research CD-ROM dealing with Viking Age crafts, such as bone and antler objects, will be available in April.

British farmer hides mock castle from authorities

Apparently to avoid building inspections and zoning laws, Robert Fidler, a farmer in Surrey, England, built and lived in a complete mock-Tudor house and concealed the structure behind hay bales.

Roman bridge reconstructed in Northumberland

A 2nd century Roman bridge, which originally crossed the Tyne River in Northumberland, has been reconstructed on the river's bank. The original was one of the largest bridges in Roman Britain.

Viking halls may help rewrite Norwegian history

Norwegian historians are rethinking the distribution of power in Viking Norway after the recent discovery of two massive Viking halls in Borre. The halls date to around 700-800 C.E. (photos)

16th century monastery built on spice

Jeronimos Monastery in Lisbon, Portugal was built on spice. Actually, it was funded with taxes raised from eastern spices brought back by the country's famous explorers.

Important English historic site may be sold for preservation reasons

When members of the Northamptonshire County Council bought Chester Farm near Irchester several years ago, they never dreamed they might need to put the historic site up for sale to keep it from falling into disrepair, but now that may be necessary.

Remnants of 9th century walls found in Prague

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of walls dating to the 9th and 10th centuries in Malostranske namesti square in Prague. The 6 meter high walls were constructed of wood and clay.

Stonehenge tunnel plan scrapped

The fear that increased traffic might damage the historic site has led English Heritage to cancel a plan to build a tunnel under Stonehenge.

Touring Great Britain's cathedral towns

Planning to visit the UK over the holidays to drink in the historic atmosphere and sing a few carols? Harriet O'Brien offers The Complete Guide to Cathedral Cities in the UK.

2nd century Roman street found in Jerusalem

Archaeologists have discovered a Roman street dating to the 2nd-4th centuries in the Western Wall tunnels of the city of Jerusalem. The side street is believed to have connected two major roads near Temple Mount.

Great Hall of the Old Deanery for sale in England

A 13th century medieval hall, located in the Salisbury Cathedral Close in England is up for sale. Originally built as a residence for 60 deans, the building was completely restored in 1963 and has been available as a venue for rent.

Hampton Court: The Lost Palace Lecture

description:
Hampton Court: The Lost Palace, a lecture with international guest Dr Jonathan Foyle will take place Friday 16 November 2007 at the Historic Houses Trust in Sydney, Australia.

From the website:

In the ballroom of our own State ‘Palace’ hear international guest Dr Jonathan Foyle speak about his experiences at Hampton Court, England’s most significant palace of the Tudor age, and his ensuing work with the World Monuments Fund. Location:
Government House (Sydney, New South Wales)

Own an authentic Roman bath!

Have an extra UK£300,000? If so, you can purchase an authentic Roman bath house in the town of Battle, East Sussex, England built in the first century C.E. for officers in the Roman navy.

Palace of the Gauls shows surprising sophistication

Contrary to popular belief, the Gauls during the time of Julius Caesar may not have been the rough barbarians as depicted in the Asterix books but a civilized society whose leaders lived in palaces.

Gask Ridge Frontier played vital role in Roman Britain

Archaeologists working on the Gask Ridge Project in Scotland now believe that the fortification, which predates Hadrian's Wall by 50 years, was an important part of the Roman defense in northern Britain. The forts were later incorporated into the Antonine Wall.

Lack of skills threatens Britain's historic buildings

Great Britain's citizens are generous with cash to protect their historic buildings, but a lack of knowledge of conservation techniques may endanger those same buildings.

Time Team finds Anglo Saxon settlement

Archaeologists associated with television's Time Team have unearthed a rare Anglo Saxon settlement near Harborough, England. The village dates from between 450 and 650 C.E.