Architecture and Construction

Anything related to the design or construction of buildings, roads, aqueducts, etc.

Amazing Roman concrete

2,000 years after it was installed, some Roman concrete is still holding strong. Why? That is the question that an international team of experts has answered through the study of the Pozzuoli Bay breakwater, at the northern tip of the Bay of Naples. The History Channel (History.com) has the story.

11th century water reservoir found in Bangladesh

Archaeologists working on a site at Gopalpur village in Bangladesh were surprised to find a thousand-year-old brick-built water reservoir. The area was part of the Bharendra region and under the rule of Pala dynasty, according to team leader, Swadhin Sen, associate professor of the Department of Archaeology of Jahagirnagar University.

"Natural Jacuzzi" found in Turkey

“We never assumed we could find such a structure. It is a natural Jacuzzi from 1500 years ago," said Governor Abdülkadir Demir about the discovery of a thermal Turkish bath (hamam) in the province of Denizli.

Volunteers join experts to uncover Roman road in Wales

For three days, residents of Abergwyngregyn, Wales worked alongside archaeologists to uncover a portion of a Roman road, which once ran from Caerhun to Segontium. The road runs near the home of 13th century Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great and his grandson, the first Prince of Wales. (photo)

"Magnificent" Byzantine mosaic found in Israeli kibbutz

Archaeologists working on an excavation n the fields of Kibbutz Bet Qama in Israel have discovered a magnificent mosaic dating to the Byzantine period. It is believed to be part of a public building in a large settlement. (photo)

"Spectacular colorful mosaic" found in Kibbutz Bet Qama dig

Archaeologists working on an excavation at Kibbutz Bet Qama, in the B’nei Shimon region of Israel were surprised to discover a beautifully-preserved, Byzantine mosaic dating to the 4th - 6th centuries. The mosaic adorned the floor in what experts believe was a public building. (photo)

Perthshire community pitches in to excavate Pictish longhouse

Residents of Perthshire, Scotland will have a unique opportunity in June 2013 to re-discover their own heritage when archaeologists will undertake the excavation of a Pictish longhouse. In addition to the chance to help in the dig, the project will include workshops, guided walks, presentations, and demonstrations.

Old Duchy Palace restoration completed

Thanks to the Cornwall Buildings Preservation Trust and The Prince's Regeneration Trust's UK£1m grant, Cornwall's Old Duchy Palace in Lostwithiel has been restored and will contain a permanent heritage exhibition about the palace and its restoration in its basement. (photos)

Scottish "wall" built fifty years before Hadrian's

BBC History Magazine reports that archaeologists have identified a first century Roman defense system that extended 120 miles across Scotland. The series of forts, watchtowers and defensive ditches predates Hadrian's Wall by 50 years, and the Antonine Wall by 20. (photos and map)

Construction workers find Bath's Roman wall

Archaeologists are excited by the discovery of part of the 4th century Roman wall in England's city of Bath. The discovery was made during sewer repairs to Burton Street.

Archaeologists hope to find tunnels under Nottinghamshire marketplace

Attention Don Wildman of Cities of the Underworld: Archaeologists plan to investigate if the legendary tunnels beneath a Newark, England marketplace really exist. The two-month study, using ground-penetrating radar, will be funded by the town council.

Roman baths found in Bulgaria

The Bulgarian resort town of Sozopol, on the Black Sea, has long attracted visitors wanting to relax. Now the discovery of a large stone thermae building shows that the attraction may stretch back to Roman times. (photo)

Hadrian's Wall to get new visitor center

Northumberland National Park Authority and Youth Hostel Association have teamed up to back a new visitor center and youth hostel for Hadrian's Wall. More than UK£10m will be spent on the project.

The intriguing history of the English home

In a BBC 4 series If Walls Could Talk, Dr Lucy Worsley, the chief curator of the Historic Royal Palaces in England, looks at the history of the home, its rooms, and their intriguing history. Video episodes are also available on YouTube.

Medieval road found under Lincoln

Six feet below street level in the center of Lincoln, England lies a medieval road, complete with wheel ruts, and bounded by a large building, such as a warehouse. Now archaeologists are faced with the task of discovering all they can about the site in six weeks before construction begins on a new store.

Medieval wall collapse damages car

The owner of an automobile in Ludlow, Shropshire, England has an unusual claim after 33 ft (10m) of the town's medieval wall collapsed, showering the car with debris. "Luckily no-one was injured when the wall collapsed," said Rosanna Taylor-Smith, councillor for Ludlow North.

Little Moreton Hall "lifted from a fairy story"

A recent Wikipedia feature showcases Little Moreton Hall in Cheshire, England, a 16th century house which is, according to the national Trust,  "lifted straight from a fairy story, a gingerbread house."

Roman bricks and cat prints bring mystery to Fort Vancouver

A grad student visiting Fort Vancouver, Washington (USA) in 1982 noticed some bricks at the fort that didn't look like the others. Analysis later revealed that these bricks were made in Roman England.

Medieval village found in Scotland

A previously unknown medieval village has been unearthed near Selkirk, Scotland.  The site was found during costruction of a water main.

Will ghosts help raise funds to save Wymering Manor?

16th century Wymering Manor, in Portsmouth, England, has had a varied history, from a family home to a residence for a Catholic religious order, but few dispute that it is now home to as many as 20 ghosts. The ghosts, however, may be the saving grace for the battered building which requires nearly UK£2m.

Car crash damages Curson Lodge in Ipswich, England

A minor automobile accident has damaged the entrance and corner post of Curson Lodge, Ipswich's "finest" Tudor house. The building dates to 1480 and was a guesthouse of the Curson House estate owned by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey.

Tolkien's tower bought for UK£1

Decades after J.R.R. Tolkien wrote The Lord of the Rings, one of the "two towers" which may have inspired the writer in the second book, has been purchased with plans for restoration. (video)

Henry VIII's Wine Cellar

Henry VIII's perfectly preserved wine cellar is underneath Britain's Ministry of Defence building - floating in a subterranean chamber.

The Lime and Ice Project seeks answers about 16th century mill

Who built the 16th century water mill recently discovered in North York Moors National Park? Archaeologists are looking for the answer among official documents after unearthing the complex, complete with millstones and the outlines of watercourses.

Tolkien-inspired "Hobbit House" graces Chester County, Pennsylvania

A devoted collector of J.R.R. Tolkien memorabilia, having spent thirty years accumulating a private collection, wanted an appropriate house to showcase the collection. Architect Peter Archer overcame surprising engineering challenges to bring the house to reality.

Eastgate House to become museum

Admirers of Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers (Westgate) and The Mystery of Edwin Drood (The Nun's House) will be gratified to know that Eastgate House in High Street in Rochester, Kent, England, is scheduled to be restored. (photo)

Recreating the Blue Boar Inn

A team of archaeologists and academics in Leicester, England have digitally recreated the Blue Boar Inn where Richard III spent the night before the battle of Bosworth, where he met his fate. The inn was demolished in the 19th century and is currently the site of a Travelodge. (video)

65 yards of influential Roman road revealed

A short stretch of Roman road in York, England may  have been a walkway for some of the city's most influential citizens, and "probably even witnessed the very first Christians on their way to worship,” according to the Dean of York, Vivienne Faull.

Art historians staggered by loss from Italian earthquakes

During the past few months, medieval and renaissance art and architecture in Italy have taken a pounding from earthquakes which devasted the country's mountain towns, killing over 20 people and damaging or destroying more than 2000 historic churches and buildings.

What made Rome great?

Evan Andrews of the History Channel online discusses the innovations that made Rome great in his article 10 Innovations That Built Ancient Rome.