Architecture and Construction

Anything related to the design or construction of buildings, roads, aqueducts, etc.

14th century caravansary open to the public in Jerusalem

Near the Temple Mount in Jerusalem lies a complex of ancient buildings including Ahar Kotlenu a refurbished 14th century caravansary, an inn for caravans, now open to the public. The site includes a 3,500 square feet (325 square meters) grand hall with cross-vaulted stone roof held aloft by six reinforced pillars.

Segontium Roman Fort rises again through digital technology

Two thousand years ago, the Segontium Roman Fort dominated the landscape in northern Wales. Now, a computer-generated, 3D model of the fort has been created, allowing visitors to fly through the building of the enormous structure. (photo and video)

Royal baths of Pliska unearthed in Bulgaria

In the 9th century, Pliska was the capital of the First Bulgarian Kingdom and heavily influenced by Mediterranean culture. This influence can be seen in the recently discovered royal baths, believed to be the oldest in the country. (photo)

West Stow Anglo-Saxon Village to get new house

The West Stow Anglo-Saxon Village in Suffolk, England, with its sunken-featured buildings, has been an important archaeological site since 1965 and a tourist attraction with reconstructed buildings since 1999. Now a new house will be built to replace one that is "beyond repair." (photos)

Swansea remembers its medieval past

Officials in Swansea, Wales are trying to bring the city's medieval past to life for citizens and visitors by installing street markers pinpointing major sites in the town. Cemlyn Davies, of the BBC, reports. (video)

Green Vikings

Artifacts unearthed from an 11th century Viking settlement near Cork, Ireland show evidence that the settlers were good at recycling and land reclamation. A new report, Archaeological Excavations at South Main Street 2003-2005 by Ciara Brett and Maurice F Hurley, has been published by the Cork City Council.

Own a piece of Magna Carta history

For a mere UK£4 million, buyers can own a piece of English history in the form of a small island in the Thames River where, it is believed, the rebellious barons who created the Magna Carta camped before the signing. (photos)

Medieval tithe barn unearthed at Croxton Kerrial dig

Project leader Tony Connolly of the Framland Local Archaeology Group has been hoping to find the "lost" 12th century manor house at Croxton Kerrial, near the Lincolnshire border in England. This summer's excavations have revealed several structures including a tithe barn.

Rome's Colosseum in the Middle Ages

Once a scene of battle and carnage, Rome's Colosseum later became "a bustling medieval bazaar full of houses, stables and workshops." Evidence of the re-purposed site was collected recently during an archaeological dig.

Medieval bath found in Shkodër excavations

An archaeological team from the Antiquity of Southeastern Europe Research Centre of the University of Warsaw, Poland has discovered a 14th century bath in northwestern Albania. The structure combines technologies of the Roman and Ottoman Empires.

Offa's Dyke may be misnamed

Offa's Dyke, a linear earthwork stretching 177 miles (285 km) in Chirk near the Shropshire border, may be misnamed. Legendarily built by King Offa of Mercia during his reign between 757 and 796, the earthwork may actually be 200 years older.

Roman house subject of 2014 dig at Maryport

Roman Maryport, near the western edge of Hadrian's Wall, has produced a number of interesting artifacts in previous digs. In 2014, archaeologists will focus on the investigation of a large, 3-room, stone-strip building discovered in 2013. (pictures)

Old Nieszawa virtually rebuilt

The original Polish town of Nieszawa, on the Vistula River, only existed for 35 years before it was demolished and rebuilt 32 km upstream, but now it lives again - virtually - thanks to a two-year non-invasive investigation including geophysics and aerial prospection.

Ludus on the Danube

For over 100 years, archaeologists have been stydying Roman Carnuntum, on the Danube River near Vienna, but only recently were they aware of the existence of a ludus, or gladiator school, covering 30,138 square feet (2,800 square meters). The new research has been used to construct a 3D model of the site. (photos)

Medieval superpowers of the Swahili Coast

Great civilizations of the Middle Ages were not located solely in Europe or Asia. Some of the world superpowers grew up along the coasts of Africa. In a feature article for i09, Annalee Newitz takes a look Songo Mnara, a city that thrived from the 10th to 15th centuries. (photos)

Walking Acre

"The Old City incorporates a multitude of forts, synagogues, mosques and churches, as well as a labyrinth of alleyways that date back centuries to the early Ottoman era and before. And there are plenty of the eight-centuries-old remains of an era when the Crusaders ruled this part of the world," writes Barry Davis in a recent touristy article about Isreal's city of Acre for the Jerusalem Post.

Dream of building a medieval town comes true

Since 1967, Bert Geuten has dreamed of re-creating an authentic medieval town using period tools and techniques. Now the first step of that dream has come to pass. In the small German town of Meßkirch in Baden-Württemberg, a team of craftsmen has started construction on a small church. (photos)

Funds needed to restore haunted Wymering Manor

Even before it was damaged by death watch beetles, Wymering Manor in Portsmouth, England was pretty creepy. Tradition holds that the 400-year-old building, once featured on the Most Haunted Live television program, is the most haunted house in England. Today the manor's worst problem is its deterioration, which has led the owners to seek to raise the UK£2.5m needed for the project.

O'Neill clan to be celebrated by renovation of Tullaghoge Fort

A UK£4 million renovation project will help Tullaghoge Fort, near Cookstown in Co Tyrone, Northern Ireland, to be developed into a major tourist attraction. The fort was the crowning place of the kings of Ulster, the O'Neills, until the 17th century.

Investigation of Shakespeare's last home to enter phase 2

Archaeologists have been working on the site of New Place, William Shakespeare's last home in Stratford-upon-Avon, since 2009 and have now discovered "as much as they can" about the site, which was demolished in the 18th century. (photos)

Pre-14th century mikvahs discovered in Portugal

Plumbers fixing a leak in a building in the central Portugal city of Coimbra found something they were not expecting: several 600-year-old mikvahs, Jewish ritual baths.

Scottish hillfort speaks of post-Roman unrest

A team of archaeologists from Rampart Scotland has discovered evidence of a post-Roman hillfort at Sheriffside, 20 miles to the east of Edinburgh, Scotland. Experts believe that the fort, and its 2.80m deep ditch, were constructed to defend against frequent raids by Scots and Picts against local tribes.

Antonine Wall to benefit from Historic Scotland 5-year plan

Central Scotland's Antonine Wall has never enjoyed the reputation as a tourist destination that its southern cousin, Hadrian’s Wall, has had, but a new 5-year plan proposed by Historic Scotland may change that fact. The development plan provides a "framework" for conservation and promotion.

Plans considered to unearth Roman baths in Exeter

The Dean of Exeter Cathedral in England is consulting with English Heritage about possible plans to make the Roman baths under Cathedral Green more accessible to the public. The baths were first discovered in 1971.

Touring Roman Britain

Jolyon Attwooll has compiled a list of the "must-see" sites of Roman Britain for a recent article in the Telegraph. The article includes photos, descriptions and links of some of the best tourist spots in the country.

The history of Byzantium's gates

No one knows exactly where all of the city gates to Byzantium were located, but the literature of the day speaks of many of them. In a feature for Hürriyet Daily News, Niki Gamm discusses Istanbul's walls and gates and their places in the architectural history of the city.

Scottish Thing identified

Experts working on excavations at Dingwall's Cromartie Memorial car park have confirmed that the site was the location of an 11th century Thing, or Norse parliament. The structure may have been built at the instruction of Thorfinn the Mighty.

Stonehenge's "Avenue" discovered

Archaeologists have long known of the existence of the "Avenue," an ancient pathway leading to Stonehenge, but a modern road had obscured it. Now workers dismantling the A344 have found two ditches believed to be remnants of the original approach.

"The greatest hall under heaven" unearthed in Denmark

Much of the action in the epic poem Beowulf takes place in the great hall. Now archaeologists in Denmark believe they have discovered the great royal feasting hall described in the poem as "the greatest hall under heaven."

Crusader hospital identified in the heart of Jerusalem

For centuries, a huge, 150,000 square feet building in the heart of Jerusalen was used as a fruit and vegetable market. Now the deserted site has been identified as the largest hospital in the Middle East during the Crusader period.