Stonework

Stone carving, masonry, and related endeavors

Air pollution controls may affect the Tower of London

Science Daily reports that the Tower of London may soon be affected by changes in air pollution regulations that have decreased the amount of sulfur dioxide in the air. The sulfur keeps organisms from growing and darkening the Tower's stonework.

Roman house found in Cotswold gravel pit

A 4th century Roman home has been discovered during excavation of a gravel pit near Stow-onthe-Wold, England. The house is believed to have been the "big farm house" of a Roman settlement.

Turkey Restores Ancient Armenian Church as Show of Goodwill

Akdamar Church, also called the Church of Surp Khach, or Holy Cross, an Armenian structure dating back to 921 C.E., is being restored in a US$1.5 million project being undertaken by Turkey as a step towards improving relationships between the two neighboring countries.

Building Stonehenge

Ah... a misty morning at Stonehenge... Want to build your own? Wally Wallington can show you how in this fascinating video on YouTube.

Medieval Abbey Undergoing Refurbishment

The medieval Torre Abbey in Torquay is undergoing the first phase of a UK£6.5 million refurbishment to turn it into an educational facility and tourist attraction.

12th century watchtower found in Norway

Archaeologists in Trondheim, Norway have discovered the remains of a stone watchtower built in the 12th century during the reign of King Sverre. The tower is believed to have been five stories tall.

Lost Stonehenge altar stone found

Archaeologist Dennis Price believes he has located the lost altar stone from Stonehenge. First identified in the 17th century, the stone by architect Inigo Jones, the altar may now lie, in two sections, along a Wiltshire village road.

Stonehenge link to other ancient sites

Archaeologists Colin Richards of Manchester University and Joshua Pollard of Bristol University have a new theory on Stonehenge: it not isolated but stood as the link between a ritual burial mound and a timber circle.

Mysterious rings puzzle archaeologists at the tomb of Chinese empress

Chinese archaeologists are confounded by a group 10 huge rings at the site of the tomb of the country's only empress, Wu Zetian. The rings, ranging from 30 to 40 meters in diameter, were discovered when aerial photos were taken.

Over 20,000 hope for shot at Winter Solstice in Ireland

27,000 people applied recently for a chance to celebrate the Winter Solstice in the Stone Age tomb in Newgrange, Ireland. Only 100 won the honor. Andrew Bushe has the story.

Stonehenge Visitor Centre Still Under Debate

Representatives from local government and English Heritage are meeting for a two-week public inquiry on the fate of the proposed visitor centre for Stonehenge. The controversial centre would be built two miles from the monument.

Medieval sculpture exhibit opens at the Met

Over eighty medieval sculpted heads, half from the Met's collection and half from other American and European collections, are on display in "Set in Stone: The Face in Medieval Sculpture," a new exhibit at the Robert Lehman Wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Animal Sacrifices or Something the Cat Dragged in?

A new study of burial cairns and brochs has led researchers to question whether animal remains found at the sites were offerings to the dead or merely "something the cat dragged in."

250,000 year-old handaxes found in Britain

Near Cuxton in Kent, archaeologists have found stone axes more than a quarter million years old and bearing craftsmanship exceeding the quality of that previously found from such an early time period.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 8, 1504

Michelangelo's "David" was set in the Palazzo of Florence on June 8, 1504, although it would not be formally dedicated until September.

Kensington Runestone May Hold Secret Code

Ben Tracy of Minneapolis' WCCO reports on the "secret code" contained in the famous Kensington Runestone. The stone, discovered 100 years ago near Alexandria, Minnesota, bears a carved inscription dating to 1362.

Stunning Sights on Pilgrimage

More than half of the Camino de Santiago, medieval Europe’s most important pilgrimage route, passes through the ancient kingdoms of Castille and León.

Romano-British Good Luck Charm Found

Archaeologists working near Hadrian's Wall in Northumberland, England, have discovered a stone carving of what is believed to be the god Cocidius, a Romano-British warrior god, used for protection and good luck.

The Mystery of Scotland's Brochs

Archaeologist Caroline Wickham-Jones looks at Scotland's 2,000-year-old stone towers known as brochs, which were built by master builders for the purpose of defense.

Cathedral Set to Sparkle Again

Ely Cathedral is to receive a UK£107,000 grant to restore the blackened East side of the building - some of which has not been maintained since the 19th century.

Vandals Hit 15th Century Baptistry

Vandals (modern-day) attacked the 15th century baptistry at Madron over the past weekend, causing damage to the structure of the ancient building just four months after major restoration began.

"UK£100,000 Will Help Us Save Our King"

At more than 800 years old, it is known as the King of Holderness. But St Augustine's Church in the heart of Hedon is slowly crumbling.

New Road Plans for Stonehenge

The controversy continues. English Heritage is still working on options to remove traffic from the area around Stonehenge, this time with five different options.

Tudor Effigies Database

Dr Jane Malcolm-Davies at the Textile Conservation Centre at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, has created a database for costumers using Tudor effigies.

Painted Anglo-Saxon Angel Sculpture Found

An almost complete (though broken) Anglo-Saxon sculpture of an angel has been found under Lichfield Cathedral.

Stairway, Sphinx Found at Hadrian's Villa

A monumental staircase and marble statue of a sphinx have been discovered in the Gymnasium area of Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli, north of Rome. The statue is believed to have originated in Egypt.

6th Century Seal Bears Image of Christ

A seal bearing what is thought to be an image of Christ and a cross has been unearthed in Tiberias, Israel. The seal has been dated to the 6th century.

8th Century Building Gets Grant Money for Improvements

A £50,000 grant will pay for a tour of Dewsbury Minster, showcasing its 'lost' heritage. It will also pay for improvements to the Grade II-listed building’s outdated lighting, heating, access, signs and literature in the site's west end.

Bronze Age Pyramid Discovered in Bosnia

Archaeologists are marveling at what appears to be a Bronze Age pyramid found recently near Visoko, Bosnia-Herzegovina. If this is a true pyramid, it will be the first ever found in Europe.

Lottery Benefits 10th Century Rattray Chapel

A British lottery fund has donated approximately $100,000 to the Aberdeenshire Council to help maintain the 10th century Rattray Chapel.