Stonework

Stone carving, masonry, and related endeavors

New secrets of Stonehenge revealed

Just when scientists think they have learned everything there is to know about Stonehenge, new technologies reveal tantalizing secrets. Laser scanning of the area around the monument showed at least 17 circular shrines as well as other neolithic structures. (photo and map)

Barley malting oven found in Northampton, England

A nearly perfectly-preserved barley malting oven from the 13th century has been discovered by archaeologists working on an excavation in Bridge Street, Northampton, England. The construction was found complete with char marks on the hearth. (photo)

Stonehenge's "perfect circle" revealed

Archaeologists have long debated over the original shape of Stonehenge, but recent dry weather in England has solved the mystery: the stone circle was actually...a circle. (photo)

Exeter's unique medieval water system

Water in the City: The Aqueducts and Underground Passages of Exeter by Mark Stoyle, a new book published by the University of Exeter Press, looks at the complex water supply system, dating to the 14th century, that once served the medieval city and now still exists beneath its streets.

Hadrian's Wall Trust is no more

Over the next six months, the Hadrian's Wall Trust, the charity that maintains the famous Roman wall crossing northern England, will be closed due to "significant financial constraints." In the future, the wall will be maintained by English Heritage and local authorities.

Incredible Lod Roman mosaics to go on display in England

A collaboration between the Israel Antiquities Authority and the British Museum will bring the amazing 3rd century Roman floor mosaics from Lod, Israel to Waddesdon Manor in Buckinghamshire, Engand for an exhibit from June 5 – November 2, 2014. The mosaics are "one of the oldest surviving complete Roman mosaics" ever discovered. (photos)

Beautiful mosiac floors revealed in Israeli Byzantine church

An excavation of a site near the Bedouin village of Hura by the Israel Antiquities Authority has revealed a 6th century Byzantine church, complete with amazingly intact mosaic floors. (photos)

Latest techniques used to help conserve ancient bridges

Researchers from the Applied Geotechnology Group at the University of Vigo in Spain are using the latest technology to study 80 Roman and medieval bridges to determine the original construction of the bridges and the best ways to conserve them.

Saving Winchester Roman wall "not possible"

Local historians in Winchester, England are outraged at the proposal that a Roman wall, unearthed in 2013 during construction of 14 new houses, may be destroyed and used as filler for foundations.

Stonehenge bluestones may have been local

Legend says that the bluestones of Stonehenge were transported from a quarry in Wales to the site on the Salisbury Plain, but a new study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science shows that the stones may actually have come from a site only three kilometres from the structure.

Life of King Sawlu told on tablet

Archaeologists working at a site near Mandalay, Burma are excited by the discovery of a 900-year-old stone tablet describing the life of little known Burmese king Sawlu. The tablet acknowleges that the king "ruled the nation by the teachings of Lord Buddha" and mentions a monastery built by donations from Sawlu's wife. (photo)

Govan stone: Viking treasures in Scotland

The Scottish town of Govan, near Glascow, has long been known for its shipbuilding, but lying in a churchyard are some of its lesser-known masterpieces: a collection of 31 recumbant stones carved with classic Viking patterns. The stones, including five massive "hogbacks," dating from the 9th century. (photos)

Keeping current on Stonehenge

It's been a momentous year for experts at Stonehenge, as well as those who visit the Neolithic monument, including the grand opening of its new visitor center. The Culture24 blog offers a wrapup of 2013 for the world Heritage site. (photos, map)

Ogham stones digitized in 3D

The iconic Ogham stones of Ireland are being digitized in 3D using Artec Studio 9 software thanks to the partnership of The Discovery Programme and the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. The stones, bearing the Irish Ogham alphabet, will now be available to view in 3D online. (photos)

Rare Celtic "pillow stone" discovered in North Devon

In 2012, 15-year-old Jack Lawrence discovered an odd stone in the rubble from a wall once part of Shutes Cottage in West Down, England. The stone bears the inscription "Guerngen" and is believed to have been a "pillow stone," placed at the head of a grave.

Roman eagle: one of the "finest artefacts ever unearthed in Britain"

An “exceptional” sculpture of a Roman eagle has been discovered in London. The statue, dating to the 1st or 2nd century, is made of Cotswold limestone and depicts an eagle with a snake in its mouth. (photo, video)

Whitewashing showed high Viking status

The discovery of a lime kiln near the Viking royal hall at Tissø has led archaeologists to believe that high status Nords whitewashed their walls. The 9th century kiln is Denmark’s oldest known lime burning oven. (photo)

Newport Arch to be restored

A 3rd century Roman arch in Lincoln, England, damaged by the country's recent cold and wet winters, will be restored through a UK£60,000 grant by the Waste Recycling Environmental Limited. The Newport Gate, which in Roman times was the gateway north to York, led to the suburb of Newport during the Middle Ages. (photo)

Richard III to be given kingly burial in Leicester

Plans have been announced for the interment of King Richard III, whose remains were discovered in 2012, in Leicester Cathedral. The announcement follows news that a legal challenge by distant relatives of the King requesting his burial in York, had been denied. The re-burial, complete with pomp and circumstance will take pace in 2014.

"Traditional methods" used to preserve Hadrian's Wall

"Hadrian's Wall is under constant pressure from the weather, from visitors, from livestock and other factors, and we need to work hard to protect and to conserve this icon of world heritage," said Bryan Scott, from the Hadrian's Wall Trust about the recent grant to rebuild parts of the wall.

"Lost" Jewish cemetery found in Vienna

In 1943, Nazis encouraged the destruction of the gravestones in Vienna's oldest Jewish cemetery. Now through the use of ground-penetrating radar, some of the stones, dating back to the 16th century, have been re-discovered.

The stonemasons of Lincoln

Medieval cathedrals are awe-inspiring. Equally inspiring are the stonemasons and carvers who originally built the structures and who keep them maintained to this very day. The BBC has a short video on the stonemasons of Lincoln Cathedral, where construction began in the 11th century.

Danelaw gravestone auctioned for UK£4,300

An unnamed London company recently purchased a 9th century, Anglo Saxon gravestone, engraved with a Celtic cross, for UK£4,300 at an auction by Duke's Auctioneers of Dorchester, England. The stone was original discovered "during road construction in the early 20th Century at Little Eaton, Derbyshire."

Irish Ogham stones digitized

Researchers of Ogham stones in Ireland may not have to actually travel to the country thanks to experts at the Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies, who have "used laser scanning equipment to capture and digitise more than 50 Ogham stones across the country." The Ogham 3D Project provides 3D images of Ogham stones from all around Ireland.

St Oran's Cross to return to Iona

St Oran's Cross, one of the world's oldest celtic crosses, will be restored and returned to Scotland's island of Iona in time to see the celebration of the 1450th anniversary of the arrival of St Columba. The 8th century cross weighs over a ton and will stand nearly 15 feet tall. (photo)

Proposed tomb for Richard III

The Richard III Society has submitted a proposed tomb to hold the recently-identified remains of King Richard III. While no site was specified for it, the "limestone monument would blend modern and medieval style decorations to reflect the king's life." (photo)

New timeline for Stonehenge proposed

Archaeologist Timothy Darvill, of Bournemouth University in England, believes previous studies of the timeline for Stonehenge have it backwards. His new theory was published in the December issue of the journal Antiquity.

Scone Palace archway restored

In September 2010, the historic, 16th-century arch leading to the grounds of Scone Palace in Scotland was destroyed when a delivery truck misjudged the size of the arch's opening. Now, after two years, the arch has been restored. (video)

Medieval well found beneath 17th century house

In June 2012, the 17th century Cupola House, home of the Strada restaurant, burned, but treasure has come from tragedy. During the restoration of the house, experts discovered a medieval well predating the later house.

"Beautifully carved" Roman sarcophagus found in English garden

An eagle-eyed art expert is responsible for the discovery of a 2nd century Roman sarcophagus overgrown with plants in a Dorset, England garden. The "rare and beautifully carved" sarcophagus is expected to sell at auction for UK£50,000. (photo)