Scribal Arts

Calligraphy, illumination, paper making, bookbinding, printing, and related sciences and arts

History of Reading Abbey on display for first time

A manuscript chronicling the history of Reading Abbey is on display for the first time at the Berkshire Records Office in Reading, England. The manuscript, consisting of parchment folios bound into a book, was created in the 1340s, and was purchased from a private owner for UK£36,000.

Book of Kells now online

The Trinity College Library in Dublib, Ireland has announced that the Book of Kells is now available to view, thanks to the library's Digital Resources and Imaging Services. An iPad app of the book is also available.

Caid Kingdom 12th Night scrolls online

Aliskye, Scribe Armarius in the Kingdom of Caid, reports that photos of scrolls awarded at the 2013 Kingdom 12th Night are now available to view online. The photos are posted on the 12th Night website.

Macclesfield Alphabet Book showcases 16th century design

The recent discovery of the Macclesfield Alphabet Book brought smiles to the lips of experts at the British Library. The 16th century 'model' or 'pattern' book was designed to display the skills of the illuminator for potential clients. (photos)

East Kingdom largesse scrolls showcased

The East kingdom Gazette has published a story showcasing scrolls given by the East Kingdom at the Estrella War to be used by other kingdoms as largesse. Photos of 13 stunning scrolls are included with the article.

More than 200,000 manuscripts saved from destruction in Timbuktu

World scholars are breathing a sigh of relief as news reached them that more than 80 percent of the precious manuscripts from Timbuktu were smuggled to safety. Many were driven by car and truck to the Malian capital of Bamako.

Getty Center to host medieval manuscript exhibit

The J. Paul Getty Museum, Getty Center, in Los Angeles, California is playing host to an exhibit celebrating the "eventful lives" of medieval manuscripts with Untold Stories: Collecting and Transforming Medieval Manuscripts from February 26–May 12, 2013.

From Carolingial to Gothic: how scribal hands changed in the Middle Ages

Erik Kwakkel, a medieval book historian at Leiden University and master tweeter on the subject of paleography and codicology, offers a 4-minute instroduction on how medieval script changed throughout the Middle Ages.

[ANS] Known World Heraldic and Scribal Symposium

The Known World Heraldic and Scribal Symposium will take place June 28-30, 2013 in the Barony of Bjornsborg, San Antonio, Texas.

Beowulf manuscript online

Ever tried to read Beowulf in the original language? Now you can, thanks to the British Library.

[ATL] Bright Hills Scribal Schola

Are you interested in the scribal arts, perhaps need a refresher in a certain area? Are there books you want but do not have the budget? Then this may just be the place for you!

11th century Jewish documents found in Afghan fox den

Two years ago, the chance discovery of a collection of documents in a cave in Afghanistan gave experts a first ever glimpse of 11th century "religious, cultural and commercial life of the Jewish community in a central location on the trade route between China and the West."

Hope for the ancient manuscripts of Timbuktu

Last week news outlets reported that militant Islamic rebels fleeing Timbuktu in Mali had torched a new library, destroying many of the city's famed ancient books. Preservationists and the Mali government are now reporting that many of the manuscripts were hidden in a safe house before the attack.

[MID] Middle Kingdom's Herald's Pointe and Scribal Collegium

The Herald's Pointe is to provide an opportunity to meet with heralds without the distractions of other events. No need to rush between tournament bouts, etc. - just the heralds and you.

Medieval graffiti in Norfolk churches

In the Middle Ages, some church members had what, in modern life, would be considered an odd way to express an idea or offer a prayer: they wrote on the church wall. Now the Norfolk Medieval Graffiti Survey hopes to record pre-Reformation graffiti in area churches.

St Chad and Gospels and Wycliffe New Testament now available online

The Lichfield Cathedral and the University of Kentucky have joined forces to create a website presenting online versions of the St Chad Gospels (also known as the Llandeilo Fawr Gospels) and the Wycliffe New Testament, both in scanned images and searchable transciptions.

[MER] Jour d'Amour

The Shire of Drakenmere cordially invites the people of Meridies to our eighth annual Jour d'Amour. Based on King Henry V's ghostwritten St. Valentine's Day poem to his French princess (while he was conquering France), our 2013 theme is The Flower of Courtesy. Valentines and warriors - what's not to like?

[DRA] Scrip2rium/30th Anniversary Celebration

Come one, come all, to the one-day revel in ancient Oxford!  Arianrhod o Gymru, Insulae Draconis Signet, and her fellows of West Dragonshire invite you to their second annual scriptorium, in the upstairs (sadly, no lift) of the Mitre pub, a period room in a Jacobean hostel, now a Beefeater pub.  The Mitre is located on the corner of Turl Street and the High, in the very centre of Oxford.  The address is 17, High Street.

Concert based on Hawick Missal presented in Scotland

For the first time in nearly five centuries, the people of Scotland will listen to the music of 12th-century century monks from the recently discovered fragment of a missal for Holy Week. The performance will kick off a two-year music and arts project celebrating the creativity of Scotland. (photo)

Cards fit for a king - or princess

A complete set of silver playng cards, created in Germany in 1616, was acquired through auction in 2010 by entrepreneur Selim Zilkha. Legend tells that the set was owned by a Portuguese princess who fled Napoleon in 1807. (photos)

Star Wars illuminated

Fandom meets fantastic when artist Chey Chao used medieval illumination techniques to tell the story of Star Wars. The illuminations were created for a school project.

15th-century prayer book highlights "the grandeur of Spanish-Jewish artwork"

A Jewish prayer book, created in 15th century Spain, is a survivor. The book includes liturgies for the Jewish New Year and Day of Atonement and managed to survive both the Inquisition and the Holocaust.

Walters Museum places digital books online

The Walters Museum of Baltimore has placed a large part of its rare book collection online, with options to view the pages online or download high resolution images.

Young Henry VIII

Is this an illustration of a young Henry VIII weeping at his mother's death?

EMERAUDE, a magazine for poetry and fiction, open for submissions

EMERAUDE (ISSN 2169-0952), a magazine for poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and art of interest to the Living History community, has reopened for submissions.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight digital manuscript

Murray McGillivray of the Cotton Nero A.x. Project reports that 180 high resolution, color images from the British Library's MS Cotton Nero A.x are now available to view on the website of the University of Calgary Libraries and Cultural Resources. The manuscript includes the complete story of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Mesa parishioners undertake "scriptorium" project

A group of women from St. Mark's Episcopal Church in Mesa, Arizona, have created their own medieval scriptorium. Under the leadership of SCA member Lee Kitts, the women have completed the Book of Genesis, with plans to finish the other 65 books of the Old and New Testaments. Maria Polletta of Azcentral.com has the story. (slideshow)

10th century pen nibs found in Bulgaria

Archaeologists have discovered a set of 11 bronze pen nibs dating back to the Age of Simeon I of Bulgaria. The artifacts were found at the site of a royal palace and church complex that housed a literary school during that time period.

Cursed in Kent

Poor Sacratus, Constitutus and Memorianus must have had a bad time in Roman Kent, England. Their names were found among 11 others on a lead "curse tablet" discovered recently by the Maidstone Area Archaeological Group.

16th century woman's prayer book reissued for modern readers

Seder Nashim, a 16th century siddur for women, and written in the Ladino language, is being reissued in Hebrew by the Ben Zvi Institute. The book The book was written by Rabbi Meir Benbenishti.