801 CE to 900 CE

The man who broke the Sutton Hoo story

In 1939, the biggest news in archaeology was the discovery of the Sutton Hoo ship burial in Suffolk, England. In a feature story for EADT24, Mike Bowden discusses how his father, Alfred Bowden, known as “Bow,’’ broke the story of the discovery. (photos)

Second oldest church "a big surprise"

Archaeologists in Mainz, Germany have discovered the second oldest church and the only surviving Carolingian cathedral in Germany. Within the walls of the city's Church of St John lie the remains of a 9th century structure whose walls "stretch from the basement to the roof."

Christians in Denmark by 9th century

New studies of the Domskirke in Ribe, Denmark show that Christians may have lived in the area 100 years before Denmark officially became a Christian country. Excavations at the site have unearthed over 70 Christian burials dating to the mid-to-late 9th century.

Anglo-Saxon tool papers online

On its website, Daegrad Tools of Sheffield, England offers an extensive list of papers on Anglo-Saxon tools. The papers are available for free download in PDF format.

Dream of building a medieval town comes true

Since 1967, Bert Geuten has dreamed of re-creating an authentic medieval town using period tools and techniques. Now the first step of that dream has come to pass. In the small German town of Meßkirch in Baden-Württemberg, a team of craftsmen has started construction on a small church. (photos)

Who's buried in Charlemagne's tomb?

In 1988, bones were secretly removed from the tomb of the Emperor Charlemagne for study and for possible identification. Now the results show that the remains are... probably Charlemagne's. (photos)

King Alfred found?

Researchers from the University of Winchester believe they may have found the pelvis of England's King Alfred the Great in a box of bones stored in the city's museum. The bone may also be from Alfred's son King Edward the Elder. The 9th and 10th century Saxon kings are best known for protecting their people from Viking raids.

Contemplating Alfred the Great

In a feature-length story for History Today, historian Barbara Yorke looks at the history and reputation of King Alfred the Great, who she names "The Most Perfect Man in History."

Govan stone: Viking treasures in Scotland

The Scottish town of Govan, near Glascow, has long been known for its shipbuilding, but lying in a churchyard are some of its lesser-known masterpieces: a collection of 31 recumbant stones carved with classic Viking patterns. The stones, including five massive "hogbacks," dating from the 9th century. (photos)

Archaeologists surprised by medieval remains at Gallo-Roman site

The last thing that archaeologists working on the Roman site of Intaranum near Entrains-sur-Nohain, France expected to find was a mass grave in a well dating to the 8th-10th centuries.

Crusaders still exist in Malta

Crusaders still exist on the islands of Malta, where reporter Elisabeth Eaves of the New York Times spoke with one for a feature article.

"Organic lump" holds rare Celtic brooch

In 1891, the British Museum acquired a lump of organic material found at a Viking burial site in Lilleberge, Norway. The material had metal pieces in it, but no one took the time to examine it further - until recently when Curator Barry Ager took a second look and ordered the material x-rayed. (photo)

Whitewashing showed high Viking status

The discovery of a lime kiln near the Viking royal hall at Tissø has led archaeologists to believe that high status Nords whitewashed their walls. The 9th century kiln is Denmark’s oldest known lime burning oven. (photo)

Re-enactor strives to survive on a 9th century farm

Pavel Sapozhnikov of Khotkovo is undertaking an experiement in history this winter by seeking to survive a tough, Russian winter "in a 9th-century environment, with no access to electricity, the Internet or other modern amenities." Dmitry Vinogradov of RIA Novosti has the story.

Hobby Lobby president purchases world's oldest Jewish prayer book

“This is the oldest Jewish prayer book known to exist in the world,” said Steven Green, the president of the retail chain Hobby Lobby, on the purchase of a 9th century parchment manuscript. Green, a collector of religious artifacts, plans to donate the book, along with his collection to the new Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C.

Bid made to analyze bones of Alfred the Great

In 2010, the Hyde900 community group was set up to celebrate the 900th anniversary of the founding of Hyde Abbey, the presumed burial place of King Alfred the Great. Now the organization has appled to have the remains of the King analyzed in order to prove their legitimacy.

Viking Shield: Viking Age replicas and gifts.

Viking Shield specializes in all your Viking needs. They offer a full range of weapons, clothing, armor, jewellry, games, feasting gear, and art.

Charlemagne comes to Switzerland

Visitors to Zurich, Switzerland may want to visit a new exhibit at the Swiss National Museum entitled Charlemagne and Switzerland, opening September 2013. Art Daily has a review.

9th century church found beneath Dongola Citadel

A team of Polish archaeologists led by Prof. Włodzimierz Godlewski has discovered fragments of a medieval fortification system and the painted walls of a church, dating to the 9th century along the Nile River in the Sudan. Part of the Dongola Citadel, the medieval church survives alongside a tower and fortifications, dating to the 5th and 6th centuries, and remnants from the 15th century.

Danelaw gravestone auctioned for UK£4,300

An unnamed London company recently purchased a 9th century, Anglo Saxon gravestone, engraved with a Celtic cross, for UK£4,300 at an auction by Duke's Auctioneers of Dorchester, England. The stone was original discovered "during road construction in the early 20th Century at Little Eaton, Derbyshire."

9th century pumpkin patch revealed in Rome

Experts from the Vatican are excited by a pumpkin patch - one that was part of a Benedictine monastery surrounding the Basilica of St Paul’s outside the Walls.

Social media may help choose patron saint of England

There are two camps in England when it comes to who would be the best patron saint, St Edmund or St George, and both are being promoted in a surprising way: Facebook. While George has been the preferred saint since Richard the Lionheart, Edmund is gaining support.

Jewelry leads to expansion of knowledge of Vikings in England

Fifty years ago, little was known about Viking settlements in England, where they were and who lived in them, but the discovery of Nordic metalwork and jewelry in the past twenty years, thanks largely to the development of the metal detector, has opened up a whole new world of understanding. Jane Kershaw of OUPblog has the story. (photos)

Viking gold "part of the big jigsaw of the history" in Ireland

Metal detector enthusiast Tom Crawford had a good day recently when he discovered a Viking gold ingot and a medieval silver ring brooch in a farmer's field in County Down, Northern Ireland. The ingot dates to the 9th and 10th centuries, while the brooch is somewhat later. (photo)

Stone from medieval church found in Welsh stream

An archeologist taking a walk in the woods discovered an inscribed stone that likely belonged to a nearby medieval church in Wales.  The decoration on the stone dates to the 9th or 10th century. The stone features an unusual cross only seen in two other stones.

Perthshire community pitches in to excavate Pictish longhouse

Residents of Perthshire, Scotland will have a unique opportunity in June 2013 to re-discover their own heritage when archaeologists will undertake the excavation of a Pictish longhouse. In addition to the chance to help in the dig, the project will include workshops, guided walks, presentations, and demonstrations.

Bored Viking Carved Outline of His Foot on Ship Deck

Two foot outlines, a right and a left, were recently noticed on removable deck planking on the Viking Gokstad Ship.

UK£57,395 needed to "save" additional pieces of Staffordshire Hoard

In 2009, the Stoke-on-Trent City Council and Birmingham City Council campaigned to keep the 3,500 artifacts of the Staffordshire Hoard in their cities. Now the councils are teaming up again to raise the money to purchase an additional 81 pieces discovered in November 2012. (photos)

Could Winchester bones be Alfred the Great?

Archaeologists have exhumed the remains from an unmarked grave at St Bartholomew's Church in Winchester, England, hoping they have found the bones of the Saxon king Alfred the Great who died in 899.

Cologne excavations reveal rich Jewish history

For years, archaeologists have concentrated on Roman excavations in western Germany, largely ignoring its medieval past, especially when it came to Jewish history. Now the discovery of over 250,000 artifacts in Cologne, is revealing new insights into "one of Europe's oldest and biggest Jewish communities."