Slavic

Remains of Copernicus found in Warsaw

Scientists believe they have found the skeleton of the 16th century Polish astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus. The identification was made using DNA from hair retrieved from the astronomer's books. (photo)

Archaeologists puzzle over layers of history in Hungary

A 3,500-year-old gravesite, a Roman military camp, and a medieval road are just three of the possibilities archaeologists are exploring at a dig near Rábapatona, Hungary.

Roman villa found in Budapest

Several months of excavation have unearthed the remains of a second century Roman villa in Budapest, Hungary, thought to be one of the earliest in the country.

Medieval stone clock found in Bulgaria

A stone clock or calendar dating to the early Middle Ages has been discovered near Mogila, Bulgaria. The stone features a semi-circle inscribed in Greek with a central axis.(photo)

Hungarians still seek “Raven King's” library

Hungarians are still searching for their own "Holy Grail," the lost library of Matthias Corvinus, a 15th century king who assembled more than 50,000 hand-copied volumes of religious texts, war stories and biographies, only to have them stolen by raiding Turks.

Roman regional capital discovered in Romania

Mihai Fifor, director of Oltenia Muzeum in Romania, believes that archaeologists have discovered a fort which may turn out to be the long sought-after Dacia Malvensis, a Roman regional capital in southern Romania.

Roman spa discovered in Serbia

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of a Roman spa in Prokuplje in southern Serbia during reconstruction work at a local church. The spa is believed to be of "monumental proportions."

St. Ivan Rilski's church discovered in Bulgaria

A team of archaeologists led by Nikolay Ovcharov have unearthed a 13th century church in Veliko Tarnovo. The site is believed to have once housed the relics of St. Ivan Rilski.

Slavic Interest Group newsletter and program notes online

Lady Marija Kotok of Sylvan Glen in AEthelemarc reports that the latest edition of the Slavic Interest group newsletter and notes from December 2007's Slavic University are now available online.

"Copernicus' Secret" brings scientist to life

Up until now, little has been known about the personal life of medieval astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus, but author Jack Repcheck brings life to the man in his new book Copernicus' Secret: How the Scientific Revolution Began. Owen Gingerich reviews the book for the Sunday New York Times.

Hungary's Year-Long Rennaisance Festival

The contemporary celebration marks 550 years since the celebrated Hungarian King Matthias brought Italian Renaissance thinkers and artists to Hungary and contributed to the development of humanist ideas in greater Europe.

Archaeologists uncover Prague's oldest ramparts

Archaeologists have uncovered parts of Prague's oldest ramparts, dating back to the 9th and 10th centuries. The remnants of the wall, which was part of one of Prague's main entrance gates, were discovered in the cellar of the Academy of Performing Arts building.

Remnants of 9th century walls found in Prague

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of walls dating to the 9th and 10th centuries in Malostranske namesti square in Prague. The 6 meter high walls were constructed of wood and clay.

Rare 14th century statue found in Czech Republic

Archaeologists working on a site near Usti nad Labem in North Bohemia have discovered a ceramic statue of the Virgin Mary and Jesus dating to the late 14th century.

First Bulgarian Empire seals found

State seals, dating to the first Bulgarian Empire (681-1018), were discovered recently during excavation for public buildings. The seals are believed to have belonged to the rulers Simeon and Petar.

"Modern" medieval castle built in Poland

A new castle has been constructed in Byczyna near Opole, Poland for the purpose of studying medieval construction and life. The Polsko-Czeskie Centrum Szkolenia Rycerstwa (The Polish-Czech Center of Knights Training) was constructed for 4.5 milion of polish zloty.

Ancient Bulgarian inscription found on tomb

Archaeologist Kazimir Popkonstantikov has discovered an inscription on a tomb from the Middle Ages in high medieval Bulgarian, a rare instance of the language. The inscription chronicled the burial site of a monk in a 10th century monastery.

"Devil's Bible" goes home to Prague

After 359 years in Stockholm, the Codex Gigas, also known as the Devil's Bible, has been returned to the Czech National Library in Prague for an exhibition. The book was supposedly written 800 years ago with the help of the devil.

14th century Christian necropolis found in Bulgaria

Bulgarian archaeologists have discovered 15 tombs dating to the 14th century near a medieval fortress in Kardzhali, Bulgaria. Experts believe the graces may have been from defenders of the rock sanctuary of Perperikon which fell under siege by the Turkish emir Orhan in 1362.

Czech ditch unique in Central Europe

A unique wood-reinforced, medieval ditch has been discovered near Prague, Czech Republic. Experts believe the ditch dates to the 13th or 14th century.

Early Bulgarian church draws tourists and archaeologists

Bulgarian archaeologists are working on the remains of the St. 40 Martyrs Church, "one of the oldest and most historically important places of worship in Bulgaria."

2,400 Year-Old Royal Mask Found in Bulgaria

Archaeologists in the village of Topolchane, Bulgaria have unearthed artifacts of gold, silver and pottery dating back to the 4th century B.C.E., including a golden mask.

Botticelli fresco in Hungary?

Art historians are excited about the possible discovery of a Botticelli fresco in the ruins of a Hungarian palace. The large work was found in remains of the palace of Archbishop Janos Vitez, the head of the country's Catholic church from 1465 to 1472.

15th century gravesites disrupt plans for Czech parking lot

Plans to build a parking lot in Pilsen, Czech Republic, have changed after the discovery of children's graves, part of a 15th century Jewish cemetery.

Relics of Bulgarian Tzar re-buried

After a special ceremony on April 19, 2007 to anoint the remains, relics from Bulgaria's legendary 12th century Tzar Kaloyan were re-buried in Veliko Tarnovo 800 years following his death.

4th century Roman remains discovered in Croatia

Roman remains and artifacts were discovered recently in Vinkovci during excavations to construct a new sports hall including a fibula, a Roman ornamental clip, dating to the 4th century C.E.

Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth website

Czesc Pan Zygmunt Nadratowski has created the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, a website for the study of hussars, cossacks or Tatar steppe warriors.

Dracula's castle for sale

Bran Castle, near Brasov, Romania, was the inspiration for Bram Stoker's classic Dracula. Now the 14th century castle is up for sale for a "paltry" UK£40 million.

Ljubljanica River gives up gifts

In an excerpt from the December 2006 issue of National Geographic Magazine, Carol Kaufmann looks at the reasons why Romans, Celts and others dumped their precious treasures into the Ljubljanica River in Slovenia.

Early Christian graves discovered in the Ukraine

Early Christian burials dating to the 11th and 13th centuries have been found in Chernihiv in the Ukraine. Experts believe that the 30 tombs prove that the city was important in early Russian history.