Slavic

Gypsies originated in NW India

A new genetic study published in Current Biology reveals that European Gypsies originated in northwest India and migrated to the Balkan area of Europe in the 6th century. The study was led by David Comas of Spain's Institute of Evolutionary Biology,

How the Teutonic Crusade changed Eastern Europe

"Within a few centuries, the Teutonic warriors led a major ecological and cultural transformation that swept the pagan Baltic tribes into the fold of European Christendom," according to a statement by Stanford University regarding an article by researcher Krish Seetah. The article was published in the November 30, 2012 issue of Science.

6th century baptistery found in Kosovo

Turkish archaeologists have discovered a baptistery dating from the Byzantine period in Kosovo’s ancient city of Ulpiana. “Baptisteries are rarely found in this region. We have succeeded in making a very important finding, as part of the first excavation Turkey has carried out abroad," said Professor Haluk Çetinkaya who led the team. (photo)

Archaeologists hope to recover medieval shipwreck in the Danube

The blue Danube's not-very-blue waters are a hindrance to Hungarian archaeologists seeking to investigate a newly-discovered medieval shipwreck in the river 18 miles north of Budapest. The Danube connected much of Europe in the Middle Ages, but was hazardous to navigate.

Early Byzantine fortress and settlement found in Bulgaria

An archaeological team led by archaeologist Ivan Hristov has discovered a 5th century Byzantine town and fortress on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast. Experts believe the town was destroyed by an Avar invasion which sealed the area in the way Vesuvius sealed Herculaneum.

Highway excavation produces ancient treasures in Romania

The excavation for a new highway in Romania has unearthed a plethora of artifacts - from Greek and Roman coins to a Celtic miniature chariot. Archaeologists have taken control of the site with the goal to preserve the artifacts for the country.

Sexaginta Prista to receive facelift

The Roman heritage of the Balkans is about to get a boost with an EU-funded renovation project of the Roman fortress Sexaginta Prista near the city of Ruse, Bulgaria.

Artifacts discovered in 13th century Bulgarian monastery

A team of archaeologists has found a number of structures and artifacts, dating to the 13th century, from an excavation of the St. Peter and St. Paul Monastery at Veliko Tarnovo, the capital of the Second Bulgarian Empire.

Website devoted to the study of Cyrillic and Glagolitic manuscripts

The Special Commission on the Computer-Supported Processing of Mediæval Slavonic Manuscripts and Early Printed Books has created a website to faciliate the study of Cyrillic and Glagolitic manuscripts and early printed books.

Hurricane reveals Roman city

A destructive sea storm early in 2012 in Burgas, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea, caused damaged to the waterfront, but also unearthed a previously unknown Roman city. Archaeologists will seek funding for further investigation.

12th century artifacts found in central Prague

The Národní třída metro station in the center of Prague, Czech Republic, is the site of an archaeological dig that has so far revealed evidence of townhouses dating back to the 12th century. (photos)

"Young Warrior's" grave reveals links to Kyivan Rus king

National Geographic's website offers a slideshow of artifacts discovered recently in eastern Europe. Among them are the remains from a grave in Poland dubbed the "Young Warrior."

Death leaves Prague... for two months

The skeletal figure of Death, along with his companions Vanity, Greed and Pleasure, has been removed from the famous medieval astronomical clock in the city of Prague for a period of two months. The animated figures will be painted to protect them from humidity. (photos)

Estonian dig reveals coins and game pieces

Archaeological excavation at the future site for the Academy of the Arts in Tallinn, Estonian has produced several boxes of artifacts dating to the Middle Ages. Among objects found were bone jewelry, dice, and a piece from a board game.

Medieval church unearthed in Sozopol, Bulgaria

It has been a busy year for archaeologists in Sozopol on the Black Sea coast of Bulgaria, where recently the remains of a 13th century church and the eastern gate of the ancient city fortress were discovered.

Khazaria: the third superpower

In the 7th through 10th centuries, two super powers ruled Eastern Europe: Byzantium, "bulwark of Christendom in the east," and the Arab empire, but some historians name a third. Khazaria, a Jewish kingdom, played a crucial a part in the stemming of the Arab advance into Europe. (map)

"Treasure of the Shishman Dynasty" found in Bulgaria

Bulgarian archaeologist Nikolay Ovcharov has discovered 18 gold coins minted during the reign of 14th century Bulgarian Tsar Ivan Alexander. The coins were found during the excavation of the medieval fortress Urvich near Sofia.

Charles and Vlad: Royal cousins?

In a speech to help save the forests of Transylvania, Prince Charles, heir to the British throne, revealed that he is related to Vlad the Impaler, the 15th-century Romanian warlord who inspired Bram Stoker's Dracula.

SCAdians hope to send team to Battle of the Nations

Max Von Halstern has a dream: to send Team USA to take part in Battle of the Nations, "the full-contact, extremely authentic medieval martial arts tournament held in the Ukraine." A discussion is taking place on Facebook.

Touring Vlad Dracula's Romania

Writer Leif Pettersen, who is researching a book on Eastern Europe for Lonely Planet, offers a history and tour of Vlad Dracula's Romania, including a 1,480-stair climb of Poienari Citadel on the BBC travel page.

Reliquary holding relics of saint found in Perperikon

Archaeologist Nikolay Ovcharov recently discovered a 5th century bronze reliquary containg a cross which held two fibers, either hair or textile, believed to have belonged to a saint.

Previously unknown medieval archbishopric discovered in Bulgaria

Bulgarian archaeologist Nikolay Ovcharov has discovered two archbishop's seals during excavations of the city of Perperikon, a crucial urban center during the Middle Ages and the Byzantine and Bulgarian Empires. The two lead seals belonged to Constantine, Archbishop of Archidos.

Poland's weekend warriors

A popular entertainment at Malbork Castle in Poland is medieval armored combat. BBC Warsaw correspondent Adam Easton attends an event and talks to spectators. Malbork is Europe's largest medieval castle. (video)

Bridge to Jewish past found in Vilnius, Lithuania

Excavations of the 16th century Great Synagogue in Vilnius, Lithuania, have uncovered the site of the Aron Kodesh, or Holy Ark, along with "part of the original floor, and the top of one of the four pillars surrounding the bima."

"Magnificent" finds at Perperikon

Bulgaria's top archeologist, Prof. Nikolay Ovcharov, has been happy to announce the discovery of incredible finds at the Thracian rock sanctuary Perperikon in southern Bulgaria, including a "magnificent bronze cross from the 10th – 11th century."

14th century Byzantine church found in Sozopol, Bulgaria.

In the 15th century, the Ottoman Turks brought an end to the Byzantine Empire. Among the last to fall were the small towns on the Black Sea, one of which, Sozopol, is the site of the recent discovery of a late Byzantine church.

15th century ring found in Bulgarian monastery excavation

A team of Bulgarian archaeologists are engaged in the excavation of St. Peter and St. Paul monastery in Veliko Tarnovo, the capital of the Second Bulgarian Empire. One of the finds is a silver ring dating to the 15th-16th centuries. (photo)

Preslav History Museum receives model of 10th century capital

Retired Bulgarian veterinarian Hristo Antonov has given a unique gift to his hometown, Veliki Preslav: a scale model of the city, the capital of the First Bulgarian Empire in the 10th century. (photo)

Lord of the Rings, Czech style

For a few hundred people in the Czech Republic, summer means donning armor and staging battles, much like members of the Society for Creative Anachronism, but these armored combatants are participating in a re-enactment of the Lord of the Rings. (photos)

10th century graves found in Hungary

The Medieval Hungary blog reports that three 10th century graves have been discovered near Pest, Hungary, one of which belonged to a high-ranking male. (photo)