Slavic

Polish "glosses" may have been written by Copernicus

Experts are studying the handwriting of scientist Nicolaus Copernicus to determine if recently-discovered glosses, or notes written on the margins, in a book from the library of the Seminary of Warmia Metropolis "Hosianum" in Olsztyn, Poland were written by Copernicus or by someone else.

13th century church unearthed in Poland

Archaeologists working in Kamień Pomorski (West Pomerania), Poland have discovered the remains of a 13th century Dominican church, part of a larger monastery complex. The church was destroyed in the 16th century.

Technology uncovers medieval defences and settlements in Poland

New studies using LiDAR (aerial laser scanning), electrofusion and magnetic prospection, soil analysis and other technologies have revealed new perspectives on six medieval sites in Poland: Chełm, Rękoraj, Rozprza, Stare Skoszewy, Szydłów and Żarnowo.

Aristocratic burials found at Polish dig

Archaeologists working on excavations in Burdąg, Warmia and Mazury, Poland have discovered rich burials dating to the 6th and 7th centuries. Believed to have belonged to local aristocrats, the graves contained such artifacts as a silver breastplate, glass beads and silver fibulae. (photo)

Professional combatants duke it out in Poland

Those familiar with armored combat in the SCA might want to take a look at a video posted on YouTube of professional tournament fighters Witold Kwiatosiński, of Poland, and Heinrich Stefan Wurzian, of Austria, at atournament in Ciechanów, Poland on 8 June 2013. Combatants use live steel and grappling techniques.

Early medieval grave finds "quite a surprise"

Until recently, archaeologists believed that the site of a dig in northern Poland was "considered quite poor," but then more than 40 graves, containing a wealth of early medieval artifacts, were discovered in Burdąg, Warmia and Mazury. The experts were "surprised." (photos)

"Vampire" graves found in Poland

Archaeologists in Poland, investigating a roadway construction site, have discovered a group of what they consider "vampire" graves containing skeletons whose heads have been severed from their bodies and placed at their feet, "a ritualized execution designed to ensure the dead stayed dead."

Ottoman armor plate found at Perperikon

In 1361, the Thracian city of Perperikon, now in Bulgaria, was besieged by the Ottoman Turks. Among the artifacts found during recent excavations of the site was a bronze plate, believed to have been part of the armor of an Ottoman commander.

Polish church may hold remains of Grunwald knights

Scientists and employees of the Museum of the Battle of Grunwald have completed a survey using ground penetrating radar (GPR) with hopes of establishing the burial site of fallen knights from the battle. The search is centered around a parish church in Stębark near Grunwald, Poland.

Roman wall discovered in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Archaeologists from the Archaeological Museum in Plovdiv, Bulgaria have discovered the remains of a 5th century Roman wall near the regional broadcasting centre of Bulgarian National Radio and Bulgarian National Television.

Sozopol "vampire" gets a face

In 2012, a skeleton, buried with a ploughshare in its chest, was found in Sozopol, Bulgaria on the Black Sea. Now the "medieval vampire" has been given the facial reconstruction treatment by anthropologist Yordan Yordanov.

Eternal love in Romania

Archaeologists are speculating on the meaning of the discovery of a pair of skeletons in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, dating to the Middle Ages, found buried together and holding hands. The pair was found during excavations at a former Dominican monastery.

Little footprints on the pages of history

Somewhere in 14th century Croatia, a scribe must have had a few choice words for his pet cat after kitty left his little paw marks on the pages of the scholar's book. The discovery was made by Ph.D student Emir O. Filipović in the Dubrovnik State Archives. (photo)

Roman baths found in Bulgaria

The Bulgarian resort town of Sozopol, on the Black Sea, has long attracted visitors wanting to relax. Now the discovery of a large stone thermae building shows that the attraction may stretch back to Roman times. (photo)

Honoring Copernicus

Nicolaus Copernicus was honored recently when Google recognized the 450th anniversary of the scientists's birth with a Google Doodle. The Christian Science Monitor followed with a article which looks at the career of the Polish astronomer.

Gypsies originated in NW India

A new genetic study published in Current Biology reveals that European Gypsies originated in northwest India and migrated to the Balkan area of Europe in the 6th century. The study was led by David Comas of Spain's Institute of Evolutionary Biology,

How the Teutonic Crusade changed Eastern Europe

"Within a few centuries, the Teutonic warriors led a major ecological and cultural transformation that swept the pagan Baltic tribes into the fold of European Christendom," according to a statement by Stanford University regarding an article by researcher Krish Seetah. The article was published in the November 30, 2012 issue of Science.

6th century baptistery found in Kosovo

Turkish archaeologists have discovered a baptistery dating from the Byzantine period in Kosovo’s ancient city of Ulpiana. “Baptisteries are rarely found in this region. We have succeeded in making a very important finding, as part of the first excavation Turkey has carried out abroad," said Professor Haluk Çetinkaya who led the team. (photo)

Archaeologists hope to recover medieval shipwreck in the Danube

The blue Danube's not-very-blue waters are a hindrance to Hungarian archaeologists seeking to investigate a newly-discovered medieval shipwreck in the river 18 miles north of Budapest. The Danube connected much of Europe in the Middle Ages, but was hazardous to navigate.

Early Byzantine fortress and settlement found in Bulgaria

An archaeological team led by archaeologist Ivan Hristov has discovered a 5th century Byzantine town and fortress on the Bulgarian Black Sea coast. Experts believe the town was destroyed by an Avar invasion which sealed the area in the way Vesuvius sealed Herculaneum.

Highway excavation produces ancient treasures in Romania

The excavation for a new highway in Romania has unearthed a plethora of artifacts - from Greek and Roman coins to a Celtic miniature chariot. Archaeologists have taken control of the site with the goal to preserve the artifacts for the country.

Sexaginta Prista to receive facelift

The Roman heritage of the Balkans is about to get a boost with an EU-funded renovation project of the Roman fortress Sexaginta Prista near the city of Ruse, Bulgaria.

Artifacts discovered in 13th century Bulgarian monastery

A team of archaeologists has found a number of structures and artifacts, dating to the 13th century, from an excavation of the St. Peter and St. Paul Monastery at Veliko Tarnovo, the capital of the Second Bulgarian Empire.

Website devoted to the study of Cyrillic and Glagolitic manuscripts

The Special Commission on the Computer-Supported Processing of Mediæval Slavonic Manuscripts and Early Printed Books has created a website to faciliate the study of Cyrillic and Glagolitic manuscripts and early printed books.

Hurricane reveals Roman city

A destructive sea storm early in 2012 in Burgas, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea, caused damaged to the waterfront, but also unearthed a previously unknown Roman city. Archaeologists will seek funding for further investigation.

12th century artifacts found in central Prague

The Národní třída metro station in the center of Prague, Czech Republic, is the site of an archaeological dig that has so far revealed evidence of townhouses dating back to the 12th century. (photos)

"Young Warrior's" grave reveals links to Kyivan Rus king

National Geographic's website offers a slideshow of artifacts discovered recently in eastern Europe. Among them are the remains from a grave in Poland dubbed the "Young Warrior."

Death leaves Prague... for two months

The skeletal figure of Death, along with his companions Vanity, Greed and Pleasure, has been removed from the famous medieval astronomical clock in the city of Prague for a period of two months. The animated figures will be painted to protect them from humidity. (photos)

Estonian dig reveals coins and game pieces

Archaeological excavation at the future site for the Academy of the Arts in Tallinn, Estonian has produced several boxes of artifacts dating to the Middle Ages. Among objects found were bone jewelry, dice, and a piece from a board game.

Medieval church unearthed in Sozopol, Bulgaria

It has been a busy year for archaeologists in Sozopol on the Black Sea coast of Bulgaria, where recently the remains of a 13th century church and the eastern gate of the ancient city fortress were discovered.