Slavic

“Lord, help Veronica”

Since 2000, Nikolai Ovcharov has headed excavations at Perperikon in southern Bulgaria, revealing some amazing finds. The latest includes a 12th to 13th century container inscribed with the words in Greek, “Lord, help Veronica.” (photo)

WWII metal detecting leads to discovery of medieval axes

A group of Polish engineers, tasked with finding and disposing of World War II artillary shells in the Forest District Wipsowo, have discovered the heads of three Teutonic battle axes, dating to the late Middle Ages. (photo)

Royal baths of Pliska unearthed in Bulgaria

In the 9th century, Pliska was the capital of the First Bulgarian Kingdom and heavily influenced by Mediterranean culture. This influence can be seen in the recently discovered royal baths, believed to be the oldest in the country. (photo)

Early medieval tavern found in Bulgaria

The discovery of "more than 100 glass cups, which were most likely used for drinking wine," has led experts to believe they have found a medieval tavern. The discovery was made at a site in the town of Misioni, Bulgaria.

Discovery of large church to shed light on early Czech religious history

Excavations at Prague’s historical Vyšehrad fort have recently revealed a large church, dating to the 11th century. The discovery of such a large building is expected to shed light on the nation’s early Christian history, and "help fill some blank spots on the map of early mediaeval Prague."

Aerial photography pinpoints lost Polish village

From the ground, a grassy area near the village of Niedźwiedziny in Wielkopolska, Poland, appears to be an ordinary field, but archaeologists believe differently. Recent aerial photographs show crops growing with the outlines of an oval-shaped medieval village.

Battle of Grunwald search to include lakes

Archaeologists working near the site of the Battle of Grunwald, between the army of King Jagiello of Poland and the Teutonic Knights in 1410, plan to use an electromagnet to drag the bottom of several lakes in the area, hoping to find weapons lost lost before and during the battle.

Oral history leads to discovery of lost Polish church

As late as the 1930s, scholars knew that a late medieval church had once stood in the town of Suraż, Poland. Now archaeologists have verified the oral history with the discovery of remnants of the building.

Vlad rests in Italian soil?

New research may show that the remains of Count Vlad Tepes, a.k.a. Dracula, may not be buried in romania, but in Naples, Italy. scholars from the University of Tallinn believe they have found evidence that the nobleman was "taken prisoner, ransomed to his daughter - by then safe in Italy - and buried in a church in Naples."

Medieval bath found in Shkodër excavations

An archaeological team from the Antiquity of Southeastern Europe Research Centre of the University of Warsaw, Poland has discovered a 14th century bath in northwestern Albania. The structure combines technologies of the Roman and Ottoman Empires.

14th century lead bulla found in Polish castle

Archaeological excavations at Człuchów castle in Poland have unearthed a 14th century lead bulla of Pope Gregory XI, a seal used to authenticate documents. The bulla is believed to have originated during the Teutonic Order's crusade against pagan Lithuania.

Polish university celebrates 650 years of learning

Once known as Kraków Academy, Jagiellonian University is the oldest university in Poland and one of the oldest in Europe. Established in 1364 by King Casimir III, the university has educated such greats as astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus and poet Jan Kochanowski. PAP, Science and Scholarship in Poland, has a feature on the anniversary.

International team to search for Grunwald Battle location

For centuries, historians have debated the location of the Battle of Grunwald, fought 15 July 1410 between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the German–Prussian Teutonic Knights. Now members of an international team will begin looking in the Great Stream Valley in Poland.

Polish "glosses" may have been written by Copernicus

Experts are studying the handwriting of scientist Nicolaus Copernicus to determine if recently-discovered glosses, or notes written on the margins, in a book from the library of the Seminary of Warmia Metropolis "Hosianum" in Olsztyn, Poland were written by Copernicus or by someone else.

13th century church unearthed in Poland

Archaeologists working in Kamień Pomorski (West Pomerania), Poland have discovered the remains of a 13th century Dominican church, part of a larger monastery complex. The church was destroyed in the 16th century.

Technology uncovers medieval defences and settlements in Poland

New studies using LiDAR (aerial laser scanning), electrofusion and magnetic prospection, soil analysis and other technologies have revealed new perspectives on six medieval sites in Poland: Chełm, Rękoraj, Rozprza, Stare Skoszewy, Szydłów and Żarnowo.

Aristocratic burials found at Polish dig

Archaeologists working on excavations in Burdąg, Warmia and Mazury, Poland have discovered rich burials dating to the 6th and 7th centuries. Believed to have belonged to local aristocrats, the graves contained such artifacts as a silver breastplate, glass beads and silver fibulae. (photo)

Professional combatants duke it out in Poland

Those familiar with armored combat in the SCA might want to take a look at a video posted on YouTube of professional tournament fighters Witold Kwiatosiński, of Poland, and Heinrich Stefan Wurzian, of Austria, at atournament in Ciechanów, Poland on 8 June 2013. Combatants use live steel and grappling techniques.

Early medieval grave finds "quite a surprise"

Until recently, archaeologists believed that the site of a dig in northern Poland was "considered quite poor," but then more than 40 graves, containing a wealth of early medieval artifacts, were discovered in Burdąg, Warmia and Mazury. The experts were "surprised." (photos)

"Vampire" graves found in Poland

Archaeologists in Poland, investigating a roadway construction site, have discovered a group of what they consider "vampire" graves containing skeletons whose heads have been severed from their bodies and placed at their feet, "a ritualized execution designed to ensure the dead stayed dead."

Ottoman armor plate found at Perperikon

In 1361, the Thracian city of Perperikon, now in Bulgaria, was besieged by the Ottoman Turks. Among the artifacts found during recent excavations of the site was a bronze plate, believed to have been part of the armor of an Ottoman commander.

Polish church may hold remains of Grunwald knights

Scientists and employees of the Museum of the Battle of Grunwald have completed a survey using ground penetrating radar (GPR) with hopes of establishing the burial site of fallen knights from the battle. The search is centered around a parish church in Stębark near Grunwald, Poland.

Roman wall discovered in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Archaeologists from the Archaeological Museum in Plovdiv, Bulgaria have discovered the remains of a 5th century Roman wall near the regional broadcasting centre of Bulgarian National Radio and Bulgarian National Television.

Sozopol "vampire" gets a face

In 2012, a skeleton, buried with a ploughshare in its chest, was found in Sozopol, Bulgaria on the Black Sea. Now the "medieval vampire" has been given the facial reconstruction treatment by anthropologist Yordan Yordanov.

Eternal love in Romania

Archaeologists are speculating on the meaning of the discovery of a pair of skeletons in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, dating to the Middle Ages, found buried together and holding hands. The pair was found during excavations at a former Dominican monastery.

Little footprints on the pages of history

Somewhere in 14th century Croatia, a scribe must have had a few choice words for his pet cat after kitty left his little paw marks on the pages of the scholar's book. The discovery was made by Ph.D student Emir O. Filipović in the Dubrovnik State Archives. (photo)

Roman baths found in Bulgaria

The Bulgarian resort town of Sozopol, on the Black Sea, has long attracted visitors wanting to relax. Now the discovery of a large stone thermae building shows that the attraction may stretch back to Roman times. (photo)

Honoring Copernicus

Nicolaus Copernicus was honored recently when Google recognized the 450th anniversary of the scientists's birth with a Google Doodle. The Christian Science Monitor followed with a article which looks at the career of the Polish astronomer.

Gypsies originated in NW India

A new genetic study published in Current Biology reveals that European Gypsies originated in northwest India and migrated to the Balkan area of Europe in the 6th century. The study was led by David Comas of Spain's Institute of Evolutionary Biology,

How the Teutonic Crusade changed Eastern Europe

"Within a few centuries, the Teutonic warriors led a major ecological and cultural transformation that swept the pagan Baltic tribes into the fold of European Christendom," according to a statement by Stanford University regarding an article by researcher Krish Seetah. The article was published in the November 30, 2012 issue of Science.