Scandanavian

Genetic links may show Vikings brought Americans to Iceland

According to new research, Viking explorers brought a Native American woman to Iceland in the 11th century, an act borne out by evidence of Native American genes in 80 modern Icelanders. Results of the study by Spain's Centre for Scientific Research will be published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

Isabelle Le Charpentier's photos from Danelaw Feast

Isabelle Le Charpentier, of the Kingdom of Atenveldt, reports that she has created an album of photos from Danelaw Feast, a non-SCA event, which took place recently in Arizona. The photos are available on PicasaWeb.

Christmas in Ireland - Viking style

In an article for Irish America Magazine, Edythe Preet ponders Viking history and influences in Ireland, including linguistically and in the celebration of the holiday season, especially when it comes to food and drink.

Viking necklace found in cave a mystery

Archaeologists are puzzled over the spring 2010 discovery of a rare 9th century Viking necklace consisting of "71 glass beads covered with gold foil." The necklace was discovered during an excavation of Glencurran Cave in the Burren National Park. (photo)

The massacre of St Brice’s Day

Experts believe they have solved the puzzle of the mass Viking grave discovered in 2008 beneath St John’s College, St Giles, England: Ethnic cleansing.

Vikings go on "Online Tour"

The British Museum offers a series of Online Tours featuring photos and text describing artifacts from different eras. One of the most interesting is the Viking Age with closeup photos of such interesting objects as an antler comb in a case.

Norse Horse equestrians to appear in Ocala Christmas parade

The Norse Horse Medieval Equestrian Group, many of whose members are also in the SCA, will appear again this year in the 2010 Ocala Christmas Parade.

10th century Viking lady's cap pattern online

On the Genevieve.net website, Baroness Genevieve d'Aquitaine shares a pattern for a lady's Viking silk cap, pattered after one found in the Coppergate excavations. Her pattern is based on research by Mistress Isabel Ulfsdottir and Mistress Thora Sharptoot.

"Weirdest claim about the Middle Ages" contest winner announced

In October 2010, the Got Medieval blog ran a contest to discover the "Weirdest claim about the Middle Ages on Wikipedia." The winner has been announced.

Where are the Viking helmets?

In "The Mystery of the Missing Viking Helmets," a 2000 article for Neurosurgery, physician and Viking historian Knut Wester explores the subject of Viking helmets through artifacts and in Norse literature, including the difficulty of finding any existing examples.

[MID] 3rd Annual Feast of Winter Nights

Velkomen!  Winter Nights or Old Norse Veturnætur was a Norse winter festival that was initially celebrated in pre-Christian Scandinavia. It was said by Snorri Sturluson that Winter Nights is one of the three most important festivals. This festival also marks the end of the summer and start of the win ter meaning the end of the harvest work and it was a time to celebrate.

Vikings raid southern Maryland

The Calvert Marine Museum in Maryland (USA) had some unusual guests when a company of Vikings - longship and all - sailed into port. The Longship Company sailed their ship, the Sae Hrafn, to the museum's boating basin for a day of education and entertainment.

Lost Viking settlement of Linn Duchaill may have been found

A team of archaeologists believes it has found Linn Duchaill, Ireland's lost Viking settlement, near the village of Annagassan, 70 kilometers north of Dublin. The outpost was mentioned in the Annals of Ulster, a 15th century account of medieval Ireland.

Test your Viking knowledge

The Viking History website offers a quiz to test your knowledge of Viking lore. The quiz includes simple and difficult questions.

Archaeologists study remains at 16th century Icelandic hospital

For the past nine years, archaeologists have been excavating what they believe is Iceland's oldest hospital, dating to the early 16th century. The building, located near Skriduklaustur in east Iceland, was part of a monastery.

Archeologists find gate in Danevirke

Archeologists in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein are excited over the discovery of a five-meter (16 feet) wide portal through the Danevirke, a 30-kilometer (19-mile) stone wall built across Norhtern Germany by the Norse in the 8th century. (photos)

Viking "thunderstones" identified in graves

Archaeologists have long wondered about the inclusion of "thunderstones"—fist-size stone tools resembling the Norse god Thor's hammerhead -- in Viking graves. New research may show that the stones were considered good-luck talismans. (photo)

[ANS] Shannon River Raids

With this missive does The Shire of Loch Ruadh invite you all to attend our new event, The Shannon River Raids, to be held October 22nd-24th in Hillsboro, Texas.

Vikings turned profits in Canadian Arctic

Patricia Sutherland of the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Ottawa knows that Vikings traveled to North America. The Vikings of her area of interest, however, were not in the New World to colonize, but to make a quick profit.

Castle discovery fills gap in Danish history

Danish archaeologists believe that the discovery of a 13th century castle on Kattegat Island may help fill a hundred-year gap in the island’s history. The castle belonged to King Erik Menved, who reigned between 1287 and 1319.

A cool US$600,000 buys Viking ship

Have you ever had the urge to own your own Viing longship? Now is your chance. The city of Sandefjord would like to sell a replace of the Oseberg ship found in 1904 in a Viking grave near Tønsberg, Norway. (photo)

Medieval German lawbook found in Swedish cellar

Experts were surprised to find a handwritten copy of a medieval law book in the cellar of the Sundsvall Library in northern Sweden. The copy of the Sachsenspiegel is only the second known copy of the 12th century legal code.

Iceland's early settlers cause scholarly debate

Icelandic scholars are still debating who the country's first settlers actually were. Tradition states that Ingólfur and Hjörleifur were the first settlers, but new evidence may show that 870, the date of their arrival, may not be correct.

Huge collection of books on period subjects to be auctioned

In the fall of 2009, the Viking Society for Northern Research received a huge windfall when Professor Peter Foote died, leaving his library of Viking and medieval-related books to the Society. By his request, the collection will be auctioned to raise funds.

Harald Bluetooth's palace found in Jutland

Archaeologists from Århus University have discovered the remains of 10th century wooden buildings which they believe are from the palace complex of King Harald Bluetooth, King of Denmark from 940 to 985, in Jelling.

Norse mythological names website

Those with an interest in Norse mythology - or those interested in choosing a Viking name - may want to visit the Behind the Name website which looks at "the mythology and history of  first names."

12th century Seitas studied in Finland

A team of archaeologists from the University of Oulu in Finland is studying seitas, sacred places of the indigenous Sámi people, some dating to the 12th century.

Real Vikings eat fish for breakfast

Refr Fiachson of the Kingdom of An Tir knows how Vikings eat, and he shares his knowledge of Norse cooking on his blog, The Viking Food Guy - Recreating the food and drink of the Viking Age (and others).

Cooking like a Viking

Daniel Serra, a PhD student in archaeology studying Viking age food culture, has created a blog, Eldrimner - a blog about medieval and viking age food, on which he shares his experiences with cooking at a Norse historical village.

Vikings feminized male names

At the April 24, 2010 Midlands Viking Symposium, Dr Philip Shaw from the University of Leicester delivered a paper on his research on Viking naming practices. His research discussed the common practice of giving female children names derived from male names.