Scandanavian

Hjaltland Research Network to be established in the Shetlands

More Norse than Scottish, the Shetlands are poised to become a new mecca for the study of things Viking, where scholars plan to begin a new project entitled Mapping Viking Age Shetland.

Considering the Viking axe

Many people have the same misconceptions about Viking weapons as they do about horned Viking helmets. On their website, Hurstwic, a Viking-Age interest group based in New England, discusses the reality of Viking axes.

What women's brooches tell us about Anglo-Saxon England

On the blog, A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe, Jonathan Jarrett offers a review of a paper by Jane Kershaw entitled New Insights on the Viking Settlement of England: the Small Finds Evidence, presented to the Institute of Historical Research Earlier Middle Ages seminar on 9 February, 2011.

Valhalla, the unattainable

In this fanciful, animated film, an old Viking warrior looks forward to eternity in Valhalla, but discovers that dying honorably in battle isn't as easily accomplished as he hoped.

Vinland the Good

A short documentary, entitled The Vinland Mystery, looks at the search for the "only known Norse settlement in North America - Vinland the Good."

New trends in Icelandic archeology

In a research paper for Scandinavian-Canadian Studies, Vol.16 (2005-6) Erin-Lee Halstad McGuire discusses new methodologies for studying the settlement and development of Iceland.

Making a Viking tool chest

In a 2008 episode from the PBS series A Woodwright's Shop with Roy Underhill, Don Weber instructs viewers how to make a Viking tool chest.

Beowulf: It Was Epic!

A recent immersion event in the Barony of Concordia of the Snows, East Kingdom, brought vividly to life the Anglo-Saxon epic Beowulf in a way seldom seen at SCA events.

"Runestone Red" wins praise for Viking scholar

Need the perfect wine for a Norse night, or a picnic on Runestone Hill? Why not try Runestone Red, a wine promoted on the Norse and Viking Ramblings blog.

Forget Denmark! Hamlet's name was Irish!

Researchers have long traced the roots of Shakespeare's Hamlet, Prince of Denmark to Amlethus in the History of the Danes, written around 1200, but a new study traces the name back even further, to 8th or 9th century Ireland.

Stone Age artifacts revered by Vikings

When archaeologists first unearthed Viking graves and ship burials, they dismissed the importance of Stone Age artfacts in much later burials. Now researchers are taking another look, one that seems to suggest the importance of "antiques" in Viking life.

Viking/Iron Age shoe tutorial

On the Earth & Living blog, "Body Therapist and Former Art Student," Therese offers a tutorial for making a pair of Viking/Iron Age shoes.

Putting a literary foot forward

Knitters looking for a cool project - or readers looking for warm feet - will want to take a look at a sock pattern by Gryphon Perkins featuring "a reproduction of the introductory text in the oldest surviving manuscript of Beowulf." (photo)

Step back in time to Birka

When archaeologists excavated the Viking village of Birka near Stockholm, Sweden, they never imagined that filmmakers Mikael Agaton and Lars Rengfelt would make it possible to walk through the town as it was in the Middle Ages.

Young Viking raiders bring shock and awww to English town

In honor of the 26th annual York Viking Festival, local school children have put on their Viking gear and invaded the festival, spreading fear and cuteness throughout the land.

Viking artifacts links

Researchers of all things Viking may want to visit the Vikverir website which features a links page of museums throughout Scandinavia which have posted photos of their collections.

Conquering armies brought climate change

Genghis Khan may have inadvertantly brought about climate change, believes Julia Pongratz, who, with her colleagues Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Germany, have compared historical records with global carbon dioxide levels.

Free "Archaeology of York" downloads

Several books in the Archaeology of York series are now available to download for free in PDF format. The books are out of print.

Vikings live on in Northwest England

A team of British researchers has recently concluded that Vikings are "alive and well and living in the North West of England." The results of their study have been published in a new book, Viking DNA: The Wirral and West Lancashire Project.

[ATE] How To Train Your Viking

Are you looking for a nice relaxing day with the family?  Ever wanted to know what it takes to be Viking?  Are you young or young of heart? Boy do we have the training program... eh, fun event for you!  Just watch out for the dragons... err, PETS!

Up Helly Aa 2011

Happy Viking New Year to one and all! The BBC offers a few shots of the most recent Up Helly Aa celebration in Scotland's Shetland Islands.

9th century Viking fortress found in Ireland

Eamonn Kelly, Keeper of Antiquities with the National Museum of Ireland, reports that after years of research the Viking fortress of Linn Duachaill has been located 45 miles north of Dublin.

Tunics shop on Etsy.com

Hailing from the Barony of Fettburg, Jerry, the owner of Tunics specializes in the making of Viking style tunics based on the Birka pattern. Using only the best wools, linens and linen blends, he creates a garment that is very comfortable to wear, durable and affordable.

[AET] Vikings on the River

'Lo, there do you see your father. 'Lo, there do your see you mother, and your sisters, and your brothers. 'Lo, there do you see the line of your people. 'Lo, do they call to you. They bid you take your place among them on
April 2, A.S. XLV in the Shire of Riversedge.

Sherwood "thing" to be investigated

Five years ago, local archaeologists discovered a thing, an open-air Viking meeting place, on Hanger Hill in Sherwood Forest, England. Now the experts are moving in for an official survey.

Talhoffer's Medieval Fight Book subject of National Geographic Channel documentary

Talhoffer's Medieval Fight Book is the subject of a National Geographic television program scheduled to air on January 25, 2011. Talhoffer was a knight and judge in Scandavia in the mid-1400's, and the program shows some of the fight strategies and unusual weapons Talhoffer described in his book.

Did Scots beat Norse to Iceland?

New research by experts from Bangor University in Wales may show that the Vikings were not the first to reach Iceland. The first may have been Irish monks from the Scottish islands who travled there 70 years before their Nordic neighbors.

Sahti: the drink of Viking champions

Some years ago, archaeologists discovered the remains of a Scandinavian ale called Sahti inside a barrel in a Viking ship burial. Now modern brewers are trying out the ancient recipe.

A burial at Viking World

On December 1, 2010, the bones of an 1,100-year-old pagan were interred at the Viking World museum in Reykjanesbaer, Iceland. The remains, first discovered in 1868, are part of an exhibit on ancient pagan burials.

Looted Viking hoard recovered in Sweden

Swedish authorities have recovered over 1,000 silver coins illegally excavated in Gotland. The coins were part of a hoard of over 2,000 coins from the 11th century of Danish, German, and English origin.