Scandanavian

Beheaded skeletons might be victims of royal decree

Dr Britt Baillie, from the University of Cambridge, believes that 54 skeletons discovered in 2009 at Ridgeway Hill in England were Viking mercenaries from the time of Aethelred the Unready. All remains were found beheaded "in an unusual fashion from the front."

Up Helly Aa 2012

The Vikings returned to Scotland recently for Up Helly Aa, the celebration of Nordic influence in Scotland's Shetland Islands. The Guardian newspaper offers a slideshow of photos from the event.

Reliving the Viking past in Dublin

Dublin's Viking past is everywhere in the city, from the Viking exhibition Dublinia to excavations at Dublin City Council headquarters. Join Catherine Le Nevez of Lonely Planet for a look at the city's Norse heritage.

Scandinavian Festival 2012

Both days of the Festival are filled with music, dancing, food, lectures, demonstration, vendors and activities for young and old alike. The Viking Encampment and Sami Village will once again be present.

The case for women Vikings

On her blog Bones Don't Lie, mortuary archaeologist Katy M. Meyers discusses proof of Viking women warriors in the 9th and 10th centuries in the form of swords found in female burial mounds. (photos)

Vikings rule at Higgins Armory Museum

The Higgins Viking Museum in Worcester, Massachusetts goes a Viking this spring with the exhibit Real Vikings: Valiant warriors or ruthless raiders? which opens March 31, 2012.

The economics of Viking raiding

For those who want to mix economics with blood and gore, Mary Valante has posted a paper presented at the Fourth Annual Appalachian Spring Conference in World History and Economics (2009).

Will linguistic research pinpoint 9th century battlefield?

Keith Briggs, a visiting research fellow in linguistics at the University of the West of England, believes he has discovered Hægelisdun, the site of the 869 CE battle between the East Anglians and the Vikings which led to the death of St Edmund. His research involves the use of linguistics.

Viking Longship presentation at Toledo Museum of Art

"Dragons of the North: The World of Viking Longships" is the title of a presentation being given at the Museum of Art in Toledo, Ohio on March 16 at 7:30 pm. Admission is free.

Shipwrecks reveal lives of medieval Swedes

Experts from the Swedish Maritime Museum are thrilled by the discovery of five shipwrecks dating to the 16th through 18th centuries, found during a quay renovation in central Stockholm. The ships, some measuring 20 meters (66 feet), are in good condition.

Grant awarded to search for Viking "court circle" in Sherwood Forest

Several years ago, the Friends of Thynghowe, an amateur history group, was instrumental in discovering a Viking Thing in England's Sherwood Forest. Now the group has received a grant to search a wider area.

[EAL] Step Spritely 2012

In honour of our Lupine Majesties Thormot Quilliam and Dagmar Halvdan, Step Spritely 2012 has a Viking theme. This is an opportunity to work on an alternate persona OR to come as your Renaissance self attending a Viking theme party.

Maria Vretmark and the mystery of the king's tomb

Maria Vretmark has a "fantastic story" to tell: Who is buried in King Magnus Ladulås' tomb? New DNA tests carried out by her team have determined that at least some of the bodies in the tomb in central Stockholm, Sweden are several centuries younger than the reign of Magnus, who ruled from 1275 until 1290.

Will skeletons tell story of Norwegian town?

The people of Stavanger, Norway are on a quest to discover the exact year their town was founded. A good starting place may be with the huge collection of human bones dating to the Middle Ages found beneath their cathedral.

1000-year-old Icelandic remains may prove ritual sacrifice

A recent report in Urðarbrunnur, the journal of the science association at Laugar in the rural district Þingeyjarsveit, Iceland, suggests that remains found in a large hole in the turf wall in Þegjandadalur, Iceland show the practice of ritual sacrifice in the time before the country converted to Christianity.

Viking longboat reconstruction in Norway

On his blog, British woodworker Robin Wood writes about his participation in the construction of a full size replica of the Oseberg Viking longboat in Oslo, Norway.

Viking silver "of national significance" found in England

Somewhere along the Cumbria-Lancashire border, a metal detector enthusiast named Darren Webster uncovered a simple lead pot, and out spilled a fortune in Viking silver. "That's when I noticed I'd found something of great importance," he said. (photo)

Vikings invade England in the 21st century

Recent Nordic archaeological discoveries in Great Britain have sparked a new interest in all things Viking. In an article for the Guardian, arts and media correspondent Vanessa Thorpe looks at new trends, based on old tales that are driving current British culture.

Help identify the Staffordshire Hoard "mystery object"

It's beautiful, but what is it? Archaeologists are asking that question about three gold and silver pieces from the Staffordshire Hoard that fit together. Guesses include a saddle fitting and the decorative terminal to a parchment scroll. (photos)

99 Danish thanes

For those old enough to have grooved to German popstar Nena's 99 Luftballoons, this video will make your day. Nena showcases her bardic chops with a retelling of Beowulf to the tune of her signature song.

Viking sunstone may no longer be the stuff of legend

According to Hrafns Saga in the 13th century, the mighty king used a sunstone to navigate in cloudy weather. This is one of several texts that list such artifacts as among the legendary Norse seafaring abilities. New research suggests that the sunstone may be a real navigational tool.

Viking Leathercrafts

Since 1985, the Viking Leather Crafts team has continually strived to provide the highest quality leatherwork for the history enthusiast on a budget - and the finest in customer service as well. After 26 years, their products are still being worn by countless swordsmen, swordswomen, and Living History enthusiasts around the world.

Viking settlement discovered beneath market square in Dublin

Arcaheologists have discovered the remains of a Viking settlement beneath Temple Bar, the cultural area of Dublin. Originally on an island, the settlement is believed to have been destroyed by floods in the 10th or 11th century. (photos)

Viking treasures to be displayed in Yorkshire, England

In 2007, metal detectorists David and Andrew Whelan hit the jackpot when they discovered a huge hoard of Viking treasure in a field north of Harrogate, England. Now the Vale of York Viking Hoard will return to Harrogate for an exhibition at the Mercer Art Gallery.

Viking boat burial found in Scotland

An intact Viking boat burial has been found in the highlands of Scotland, the first burial of its kind found on the UK mainland. The artifacts found at the site indicate the man buried there may have been a high ranking warrior.

Professor investigates newly-discovered Missouri runestone

Dr. James Frankki, of Sam Houston State University, has studied the Kensington Runestone in Minnesota and the Heavener Runestone in Oklahoma. Now he is taking look at a recently-discovered stone in Missouri.

Nat Geo to explore Staffordshire gold

On Monday November 7, 2011, the National Geographic Channel will present two, hour-long programs on the Staffordshire Hoard, the Viking treasure discovered in 2010 in England. The programs are scheduled for 8:00 and 9:00 p.m. (EST).

Archaeology meets folklore in documentary

Filmmakers Davide Marco Zori and Jesse Byock from the UCLA Archaeology Department explore "whether oral and written histories can help us understand the relics of the past" in The Saga of a Viking Age Longhouse in Iceland.

What prompted the Icelandic Sagas?

Dr. Emily Lethbridge of Cambridge University is seeking to understand the significance of the Icelandic Sagas, why they were created during the 13th and 14th centuries, and why they still resonate with the people of Iceland today.

Important Viking site in Ireland confirmed

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Viking village in Louth County, Ireland are calling it "one of the most important Viking sites in the world." The site is believed to be where the Vikings brought their long ships for wintering and repair.