Italian

[ANT] Day of Dance

Now that the meetings are over, come enjoy a fine meal in the Italian style, and then dance the night away. Aquaterra and Bearwood are combining their talents again to present to you a Day of Dance and the Prehibernation Feast. Join us, again, at the Garden City Grange, 800 2nd St, Snohomish, Washington 98290.

The lost art of timbrel vaulting

In its "Lost Knowledge" column, Make: Online presents an article on the lost medieval art of timbrel vaulting, an architectural technique using a "system of interlocking terracotta tiles which create what are known as Guastavino domes, after their inventor, Rafael Guastavino." (photos and diagrams)

Evidence suggests Galileo may have discovered Neptune

Professor David Jamieson, Head of the School of Physics at the University of Melbourne, says examination of the notebooks of Galileo reveal that the Italian scientist probably discovered Neptune over 200 years before its officially-listed discovery date.

Vatican tomb declared that of St. Paul

Remains discovered in 2006 beneath the Vatican have been declared to belong to St.Paul, according to Pope Benedict. The tomb bore the epigraph Paulo Apostolo Mart (Paul the Apostle and Martyr).

"Naked Mona Lisa" sparks controversy

Long hidden behind a panel, a portrait of a semi-nude woman bears a striking resemblance to Leonard Da Vinci's famous Mona Lisa. The painting was once believed to have been done by the Da Vinci, but now experts feel that it may have been inspired by a lost masterpiece. (photo)

Pages from da Vinci's "Codex Atlanticus" unglued

A group of Benedictine nuns from the Abbey of Viboldone haave been working tirelessly for months to unbind Leonardo da Vinci's Codex Atlanticus, a collection of writings and drawings bound into a single volume in the 17th century by sculptor Pompeo Leoni.

Debate continues over Michelangelo crucifix

A EU3.3 million wooden crucifix, bought recently at auction by the Italian government, may or may not have been created by Michelangelo. The newly-purchased piece made its debut in December at the Italian Embassy to the Holy See, and was visited by the Pope.

Pope commemorates bravery of Swiss Guard during Regime of Terror

Pope Benedict XVI recently commemorated the bravery of the Swiss Guard, who helped save the city of Rome from an army of mercenaries in 1527, by swearing in the latest batch of recruits.

Verrocchio sculptures by student da Vinci?

Were two of the sculptures in Andrea del Verrocchio's silver altar panel Beheading of the Baptist actually created by the artist's student assistant Leonardo da Vinci? Gary M. Radke, a professor of the humanities at Syracuse University, thinks so. The work will be on exhibit at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, GA.

Viewing Giotto through modern eyes

An article on great works of art for the UK's paper The Independent discusses how works of art from the past are viewed through modern eyes. Included is The Lamentation of Christ by 14th century Italian master Giotto, whose angels seem to zoom about like jet planes. (photo)

Pope creates two new medieval saints

Among the five new saints created recently by Pope Benedict were a 14th century Portuguese friar and an early 14th-century Sienese aristocrat. The saints were canonized in a ceremony at the Vatican.

[LOC] Autumn Feast

Ildhafn's Autumn Feast: a gentle evening to recover from the rigours of May Crown. On Saturday the 9th of May. Cathrine de Vantier will be cooking a sumptuous Autumnal Feast, and we will intermingle and follow this with music, dancing and games, with an Italian theme.

Galileo's telescope travels to th U.S.

For the first time, one of Galileo's telescopes has left Florence to be part of an exhibit in the United States. according to Derrick Pitts, chief astronomer for the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, the 400-year-old telescope, which bears an inscription in the astronomer's handwriting, is “absolutely amazing.”

Earthquake takes lives, damages treasures in central Italy

Tragedy struck central Italy April 7 when a 6.3 magnitude earthquake toppled ancient and modern buildings in the medieval city of L’Aquila. Over 200 people lost their lives, and the earthquake damaged nearly all the historic buildings of the town. (video)

Wedding at the House of Juliet

What could be more romantic than getting married at the site of the legendary Romeo and Juliet balcony scene? Nearly anything, if you are put off by star-crossed lovers parted by suicide, but Verona city officials are banking on the romantic appeal of the site for international weddings.

In 1492 Scotto sailed the ocean blue, laddie

According to Spanish historian Alfonso Ensenat de Villalonga, Christopher Columbus was born in Genoa, Italy to Scottish shopkeepers, and was christened Peter Scotto.

Santa Clara University showcases medieval garden

In honor of its namesake St. Clare of Assisi, Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, California has created a medieval garden dedicated to the saint who was "was often compared to a plant or garden." The university's website includes a great deal of information on medieval gardens.

Sketch of da Vinci in middle age found

After months of restoration, a sketch, thought to be an early self portrait of Leonard da Vinci, has been discovered. The drawing was found was covered by handwriting. (video)

Galileo's digit part of anniversary exhibit

An exhibit honoring the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first astronomical observations will include 250 objects from the scientist's life. Included will be Galileo's right, middle finger, displayed in a crystal jar.

Example of anti-plague burial ritual unearthed in Venice

Archaeologists excavating medieval mass graves in Venice have uncovered a woman buried with a brick in her mouth to stop her chewing on her bloody burial shroud after death, a practice believed at that time to spread the plague.

The archaeology of farming

Those interested in the history of farming and agriculture will want to visit Roberta Alunni's website on the Fratticciola Museum of Farming Culture which looks at "parallels between Etruscan and Tuscan agriculture."

Love letters in the 12th century

Karin Larsdatter provides advice for the lovelorn in a translation on her Medieval Material Culture Blog. The entry looks at a 12th century handbook of letter writing recently discovered at the Biblioteca Capitolare di Verona.

Submerged island and sunken galley may hold clues to Venetian dominance

Italian archaeologists are undertaking a project to raise an entire island which has been submerged in the lagoon of Venice since the 16th century. Among the artifacts they hope to recover is a remarkably preserved 13th century wooden galley.

Bad eyesight may have affected Galileo's findings

A joint Italian and British project to test the DNA of the exhumed body of Renaissance scientist Galileo may lead to interesting findings, including the theory that vision problems affected the astronomer's work.

[OUT] A Weekend at the Florentine Camerata

The year is 1573 in Bella Firenze. Giovanni d'Bardi, Count of Vernio, formally invites you to the Court of the Florentine Camerata, hosted in the artistically fertile lands of his dear friends, Byarki and Asta, the Baron and Baroness of Caer Galen. The great minds and most august men (and women) of Florence will be there assembled in order to restore to glory the great art and music of ancient Greece.

Lucrezia Borgia: businesswoman

New research by an American historian, Diane Yvonne Ghirardo, may show that Lucrezia Borgia was falsely accused of the murder of her husband, and that she may have been more involved with business than with intrigue.

Lionheart shines at Metropolitan Museum of Art

The early-music vocal sextet Lionheart recently offered a program of Christmas music of 13th through 16th-century Italy in the Medieval Sculpture Hall of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Allan Kozinn of Medievalists.net has a review.

Advanced techology restores Madonna and Child to splendor

When the Renaissance masterpiece Madonna and Child With Saint Anthony Abbot and Saint Sigismund by Neroccio de' Landi arrived at Washington's National Gallery of Art conservation lab 18 months ago, it had faded paint and damaged gilding. Now the work shines, thanks to the careful handling of restoration experts. (photos)

Dante inspires video game

Dante Alighieri's 14th century masterpiece The Divine Comedy has now inspired a video game. Electronic Arts Inc. has announced that it is working on a new game based on Dante’s Inferno.

Correggio makes comeback in Parma

Correggio, one of the great masters of Renaissance Italy, has been overlooked for the past century, but is now finding new appreciation through a full-scale retrospective at various venues in his favorite city, Parma, Italy. (video)