Italian

Renaissance portraiture showcased in Met exhibit

Those interested in Renaissance portraiture and costuming may want to visit the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibit The Renaissance Portrait from Donatello to Bellini December 21, 2011–March 18, 2012.

Fibonacci: How numbers helped shape the development of modern Western Europe

In 1202, life in western Europe was changed by the publication of Liber abbaci, a book by Leonardo of Pisa, known as Fibonacci, the first general-purpose book of arithmetic in the West, which "explained the 'new' methods in terms understandable to ordinary people."

Art historian finds devil is really in the details

An art historian claims to have found an image of the devil in the fluffy clouds of a 13th century fresco by the early Renaissance artist Giotto. The fesco, in the Assisi Bascilica in Italy, depicts the death of St. Francis of Assisi.

Own an "extraordinary medieval castle" in Italy

Southby's International Realty invites interested parties to purchase an "Extraordinary Medieval Castle" in Torino, Italy.

13th century graveyard in Italy reveals strange burials

A woman with nails driven into her skull and another surrounded by 17 dice have led archaeologists to speculate that a cemetery in Tuscany may have been a witch's graveyard.

Life of Jewish patroness Benvenida Abravanel explored

In an article for The Jerusalem Post Magazine, writer and professor of Jewish history Renee Levine Melammed explores the life of Benvenida Abravanel, a 16th century resident of Naples and Ferrara, known for her philantrophy and patronage of David Hareuveni, the 16th century messianic claimant.

Michelangelo's David heralds beginning of modern science

Most people viewing Michelangelo’s magnificent sculpture of David admire its artistic beauty and proportion, but to Dr. Kelly Cline, the statue symbolizes something else: the birth of modern science. The article appears in the Independent Record (Helena, Montana).

First phase of St. Peter's Colonade restoration revealed

Rome Reports has released a sort video on YouTube showcasing the newly renovated left Colonnade at St. Peter's Basilica in Rome.

Phalluses scrubbed from medieval fresco

After a three-year restoration project, the 13th century Tree of Fertility fresco in the small Italian town of Massa Marittima was ready to view, but art experts had some problems with the restoration work when they noticed that testicles and phalluses hanging from the tree had been removed.

[LOC] One House Divided: A Tale Of Two Cities

You are invited to the palace of the Doge of Venice to witness the end of a long standing dispute between the widow Sammicheli of Venice and Fortunato of Florence. As it is an Italian feast of 1585, expect intrigue, plotting, bloodshed, poisonings, mayhem and murder. As well as lots of good food.

Outlands costumer wins praise

THL Magdalena Lucia Ramberti, known in the modern world as Christa Gordon, recently won acclaim by placing third in the Italian Renaissance Costuming Challenge. Gordon explained her specialty, Italian Renaissance courtesan clothing, to reporter Claire Martin of the Denver Post. (slideshow)

Artemisian wins the Realm of Venus Italian Renaissance Costuming Challenge

The Realm of Venus' 4 month long Italian Renaissance Costuming Challenge is over, with 14 finalists from around the world completing the challenge to make an Italian Renaissance outfit from the skin out.

Giostra Cavalleresca brings tourists to ancient Italian town

"We live the Giostra in our hearts," said Tilde Carugno about the Giostra Cavalleresca, or medieval jousting, that transports the tiny central Italian town of Sulmona to the Renaisasance for one summer week each year. (photos)

Oxford crucifixion painting may be a true masterpiece

When a painting of the Crucifixion was purchased for Campion Hall at the University of Oxford in the 1930s, the buyers never dreamed they had a true Renaissance masterpiece painted by Michelangelo himself. (photo)

Newly-discovered da Vinci could break world auction record

When Salvator Mundi or Saviour of the World, goes to auction, it could sell for a world record UK£125 million. The recently-restored painting, once attributed to Giovanni Antonio Boltraffio, a protégé of Leonardo, has been certified an authentic da Vinci by a panel of experts. (photo)

New project to explore social networking in Renaissance Italy

Professor Jane Everson, from the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway, believes that Italian academics of the Renaissance pre-dated today's Facebook and Twitter users by more than 400 years by using correspondence to debate social issues.

Fresco of St. Paul found in Naples catacombs

A 6th century fresco of St. Paul has been discovered in the Catacombs of San Gennaro in Naples during restoration work according to L'Osservatore, the official Vatican newspaper. (photo)

Armor reconstruction based on 12th century cathedral

The beautiful Cathedral of Monreale in Sicily was the inspiration for a reconstructed set of 12th century armor and military equipment by Patryk Nieczarowski. The armor is that of a Siculo-Norman miles. (photos).

What will the sinking of Venice mean to the world?

"Venice has become a museum city, no longer a residential one," said a Unesco director recently about the city threatened by rising sea levels. Jack Watkins of The Independent discusses the fate of the city.

Lead coffins found in Roman city

Two sarcophagii made of lead have been found at the site of the ancient city of Gabii in Italy. The caskets date to the 1st or 2nd century CE.

Reading Dante

Is medieval poetry worth reading? A.N. Wilson thinks so, and shares thoughts in an article for the New Statesman: "Dante, a poet for all seasons."

Did Giotto paint the shroud of Turin?

A new book by an Italian art historian claims that the Shoud of Turin is neither a biblical relic nor a medieval hoax, but a creation of the famous Rennaissance artist Giotto.

Diary of Siege of Constantinople online

In 1453, Italian surgeon Nicolo Barbaro recorded his account of the siege and fall of Constantinople. The diary is now available to read online.

The unconventional life of Renaissance woman Copia Sulam

Copia Sulam was a true Renaissance woman: poet, linguist, conversationalist and hostess of reknown in Venice at the beginning of the 17th century. Renee Levine Melammed of the Jerusalem Post examines her extraordinary life.

The literary origin of ‘Syphilis’

For centuries, people have dreaded the diagnosis of the STD Syphilis, but where did the name originate? Acording the the website Science Friday, Syphilus was the name of the hero of a epic poem written by Hieronymus Fracastorius in 1530.

"DaVinci Cannon" found in Croatia

Known for his artwork and whimsical flying machines, Leonardo DiVinci's military designs were in high demand in his lifetime. Now, archaeologists believe a 15th century triple-barreled cannon may be the first physical evidence of DaVinci's concept design for an early machine gun.

Realm of Venus sponsors Italian Ren costuming challenge

In celebration of its tenth anniversary, the website Realm of Venus is sponsoring The Italian Renaissance Costuming Challenge from April 21 to August 21,  2011.

Tomb of St Francis of Assisi re-opens

A special Franciscan mass will celebrate the re-opening of the restored tomb of St Francis of Assisi in Umbria, Italy. The saint died in 1226. (photo)

Exhumation of Mona Lisa planned

"We can put an end to a centuries-old dispute and also understand Leonardo's relations to his models," said art historian Silvano Vinceti, who plans to exhume the body of Lisa Gherardini, believed to have been the model for da Vinci's famous painting.

Leprosy, battle wounds found in early medieval cemetery

The scull of a leper who died fighting is one of several interesting burials identified at an Italian cemetery used between 500 and 700 CE. The cemetery likely contains remains of Germanic Lombards or Avars.