Known World Dance Symposium XI registration open

Margaret de Mey, KWDS XI Co-event steward, reports that registration is open for the Known World Dance Symposium XI which will take place April 15-19, 2015 in Miltenberg Germany.

Extraordinary finds at "Pompeii of the north"

Archaeologists marvel at discoveries from the Binchester Roman Fort near Bishop Auckland in northern England, a 2nd century site which has been dubbed the "Pompei of the north." (photos)

Long lost Salisbury Hall discovered beneath former stadium car park

In 1322, the Salisbury Manor was built in Walthamstow, a suburb of London. The manor burned in the 16th century and was replaced by a Tudor structure, but was also lost. Now a team of archaeologists from Archaeology South East have found Salisbury Manor  beneath a former car park for Walthamstow Stadium.

Company of the Dove has "Breakfast with Jacquie Mackay"

During a recent interview, Jacquie Mackay of 612 ABC Brisbaine (Australia) spoke with Jen Dunn of the Living History reenactment group Company of the Dove. A podcast of the interview is available on the website.

Agincourt 2014 photos online

Master Caelin on Andrede reports that he has created an album of photos from Agincourt 2014 which took place recently in the Kingdom of Ansteorra. The photos are available to view on Flickr.

Abandoned school becomes Richard III grave visitor center

Leicester, England mayor Peter Soulsby was on hand recently to celebrate the opening of a UK£4 million visitor center near the site of the grave of Richard III, discovered in 2012 in a city car park. The center is housed in an abandoned school building.

Laurels' Prize Tourney 2014 photos online

Lady Helene von Braunschweyg reports that she has created an album of photos from Laurels Prize Tourney, which took place September 13, 2014 in the Kingdom of Ansteorra. The photos are available to view on Flickr.

Ansteorra lauded for volunteer hours at Gulf Wars

Gulf Wars Exchequer, Baroness Genevieve McCullum de Caen, reports that the Kingdom of Ansteorra totaled over 4700 hours of volunteer time at the 2014 Gulf Wars. She lists the hours for the top five groups.

Archaeologists fail to solve mystery of Silchester

Archaeologists have packed their tools and left the site of the Silchester Roman town in Hampshire, England, still without an answer as to why the major town was abandoned in the sixth century.

Viking burial research project draws to a close

In 1999, Stephen Harrison and Raghnall Ó Floinn have headed a project to catalog Viking burials beneath the city of Dublin. Their work has produced an 800-page book entitled Viking Graves and Grave Goods in Ireland. The site is now considered the largest Viking burial zone in western Europe outside of Scandinavia.

Medieval teen given face in Scotland

In 2009, the remains of nearly 400 people were discovered by workers for the Edinburgh Trams system in Leith, Scotland. Now forensics experts have given one of the individuals, a teenage boy, a face. (photos)

First English book brings more than £1m

The Recuyell of the Histories of Troye is considered to be the first book ever to be printed in English. A translation of a French book by William Caxton, the 1474 English edition sold recently at auction for more than £1m. (photo)

Ren faire entertains in Cedar City, Utah

Southern Utah took a step back in time recently with the arrival of the Utah Midsummer Renaissance Faire to Cedar City. Zach Whitney of Fox 13 Salt Lake City visited the faire and spoke to some of its guests. (video)

French necropolis offers "rich grave goods"

Archaeologists in Saint-Aubin-des-Champs, France have discovered a burial ground containg more than 300 graves dating from the 5th through 7th centuries. The graves were single burials and included "rich grave goods." (photos)

Alamanda de la Roca elevated to Laurel at Battlemoor

Mariah reports that Their Majesties Walrick and Cecilia of the Kingdom of the Outlands offered elevation to the Order of the Laurel to THL Alamanda de la Roca.

SCAdian Nick Marcelja turns hobby into business

In an installment of the The Columbian (Vancouver, Washington) series Working in Clark County, news assistant Mary Ricks interviewed blacksmith and SCA member Nick Marcelja, who turned his hobby into a business.

Masters thesis studies veracity of period combat manuals

In his Master of Arts Dissertation for the University of Exeter, Johann Keller Wheelock Matzke examines bioarcheology studies from five medieval digs for skeletal injuries to check the veracity of sources on medieval combat. A PDF of his paper, Armed and Educated: Determining the Identity of the Medieval Combatant, is available online.

Viking longboat to draw visitors to the public library

In 1838, the remains of a Viking longboat were discovered at Stanley Ferry, near Wakefield, England, at a natural crossing point for the River Calder. Now the 1,000-year-old vessel will be on display at the Wakefield Library. (video, photos)

Battle of Grunwald search to include lakes

Archaeologists working near the site of the Battle of Grunwald, between the army of King Jagiello of Poland and the Teutonic Knights in 1410, plan to use an electromagnet to drag the bottom of several lakes in the area, hoping to find weapons lost lost before and during the battle.

Medieval tagging: what it means

"We want to record it before it's lost," said Brian Porter of Lincolnshire's medieval graffiti project about thousands of medieval doodles found on the walls of English churches. Porter is co-chair of the volunteer project to record the graffiti and learn more about the thoughts of the people of the time. (photos)

Sutton Hoo brooch replica added to exhibit

In the 1840s, a ploughman in Suffolk, England discovered what remained of an Anglo-Saxon gold brooch, and traded it for a set of teaspoons. Recently, as part of the 75th anniversary of the discovery of the Sutton Hoo ship burial, a replica of the brooch, complete with gold, silver, bone and garnet stones, has been included in the exhibit. (photo)

What killed Richard III?

A new report, published in The Lancet, reveals that King Richard III was "probably killed by two blows to the head during a 'sustained attack'" when he perished August 22, 1485 in the Battle of Bosworth. (photos)

Fun and a history lesson in North Carolina

Attendees of Pamlico Community College's second annual renaissance fair in Grantsboro, North Carolina come for a number of reasons: the fun, the music and the history. This year's fair was visited by Charles Hall of the Sun Journal. (photos)

Medieval Italian died of brucellosis, say scientists

DNA testing has revealed that a man, whose skeleton was found in the ruins of a Medieval Italian village, died of an infection called brucellosis usually acquired by ingesting unpasteurized dairy products. The report, by Warwick Medical School's Professor Mark Pallen and his colleagues, was published in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

John C. Reilly at the ren faire

Any self-proclaimed geek will appreciate actor John C. Reilly's story about his attendance at a Renaissance faire. He shared the story, as well as a photo of himself from the time, on Late Night with David Letterman. (video)

More Pennsic 43 photos online

Brita of the East Kingdom reports that she has created an album of photos from Pennsic 43. The photos may be viewed on her Shutterfly website.

The diet of a king

The discovery of the remains of Richard III has given the scientific community an unparalleled glimpse into royal lifestyles in the Middle Ages. The latest published research involves the diet and drinking habits of the 15th century monarch.

An SCA Challenge

Viscountess Elashava bas Riva of the Kingdom of Northshield has posed a challenge to SCA members in her kingdom and to the Known World: Do five things to better the SCA and your experience of it.

A day in the park with Stormwrath

It's 100 degrees Fahrenheit in Riverside Park, Wichita, Kansas, but that doesn't deter Eric Simoncic and Andrew Walker, members of Stormwrath, the local chapter of the Midwest Dagorhir Union, who spent the hot day practicing with foam weapons. Kelsey Ryan of the Wichita Eagle has the story.

Medieval tithe barn unearthed at Croxton Kerrial dig

Project leader Tony Connolly of the Framland Local Archaeology Group has been hoping to find the "lost" 12th century manor house at Croxton Kerrial, near the Lincolnshire border in England. This summer's excavations have revealed several structures including a tithe barn.