Byzantine pilgrimage site found in the Sudan

The excavation of the medieval monastery al-Ghazali in Northern Sudan is astonishing archaeologists who have unearthed a second church on the site as well as a large number of fragments of funerary stelae and inscribed vessels. The monastery is believed to have been a major pilgrimage site before the 13th century. (photos)

Society Seasonal Archery Competition

Archers of the Known World are invited to participate in the Fall Society Archery Competition, currently in progress around the SCA. Sir Jon Fitz-Rauf introduces the competition.

Re-living history at the Michiana Renaissance Festival

Kamm Island Park in Mishawaka, Indiana became the "Kingdom of Kamm" recently when the Michiana Renaissance Festival came to town. Tricia Harte of WNDU - Channel 16 - in South Bend hosts three videos on the Faire.

The history of the octothorpe and more

Modern social networkers will recognize the octothrope as the opening character of a hashtag, but the lowly punctuation mark has a noble history. In his book, Shady Characters: The Secret Life of Punctuation, Symbols & Other Typographical Marks, Keith Houston looks at punctuation marks' roots from Greek, Roman and 14th century texts.

The Coronation of Kenric II and Avelina II

The East Kingdom Gazette provides a full account, with pictures, of last weekend's coronation of Kenric II and Avelina II at Barony of the Bridge.

Charles Brandon's falconry vervel shows royal connection

Charles Brandon, the first duke of Suffolk, was a great chum of Henry VIII. In fact, he married Henry's sister Mary. Evidence of this royal connection was discovered recently in the form of a silver vervel found in a Norfolk, England field.

Freer/Sackler Galleries receive grant for Chinese art conservator

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and Freer Gallery of Art of the Smithsonian in Washigton D.C. have received a US$1 million challenge grant, awarded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, to endow the position of an assistant Chinese painting conservator.

The Passing of a Gentle Giant - Master El of the Two Knives

Master El of the Two Knives, one of the founders of the East Kingdom, passed away on October 1, 2013 after a long illness. He will be remembered for his kindness and his long years of service.

Boat burials might help solve mystery of Viking trading center

To most historians, Steinkjer was just a name mentioned in the Norse Sagas, but new evidence discovered in two boat graves in Lø, Norway, may have solved the puzzle of the mysterious trading center.

Bath Abbey threatened by its dead

Bath Abbey, the late 15th century church that looms over the Roman ruins in Bath, England, is under siege -- by the dead. Not zombies, but over 6,000 bodies, threaten to lift the abbey's floor and collapse the building.

Remains of Irish mother and children considered "significant"

Experts from the Caherconnell Archaeological School are pondering the discovery of the remains of a “45-year-old plus” woman" and two infants beneath the remains of the 10th century cashel (fort). The archaeologists believe that the remains belong to a wealthy family, possibly the local Gaelic rulers, the O’Loughlins.

Priory and brewhouse excavation tell story of monks' lives

The land under social services and government buildings in Bicester, England once belonged to a community of monks who worked the land and may have partaken of as much as "10 pints of beer a week."

New book relocates Battle of Bosworth

For centuries, everyone knew that the Battle of Bosworth, which led to the death of Richard III and the ascendence of the Tudors, took place on Ambion Hill, but new research by Glenn Foard and Anne Curry places the site two miles away by a marsh called Fen Hole.

Ottoman armor plate found at Perperikon

In 1361, the Thracian city of Perperikon, now in Bulgaria, was besieged by the Ottoman Turks. Among the artifacts found during recent excavations of the site was a bronze plate, believed to have been part of the armor of an Ottoman commander.

Secret of Northamptonshire chapel revealed

Under an unassuming village church in Rothwell, England lies a 700-year-old crypt containing hundreds of skeletons, only one of two still remaining in the country. Why were they there? Experts from the University of Sheffield's Department of Archaeology think they know. (photos)

Jennet the Gentle placed on vigil in AEthelmearc

Baronsfru Othindisa Bykona reports that at Their Shoote in the Wildwoode in the Barony of Delftwood, Their Majesties Maynard and Liadain placed Baroness Jennet the Gentle on vigil to contemplate elevation to the Order of the Pelican.

The History of Heralds in Europe: call for papers

The University of Münster in Münster, Germany has sent out a call for papers for a conference to be held March 26-28, 2014. The theme of the conference is The History of Heralds in Europe  (12th-18th c.)

Medieval Treasures From Hildesheim on display at the Met

"Smack in the middle of the Metropolitan Museum, there’s a nugget of compressed light called  Medieval Treasures From Hildesheim," begins a review of the new exhibit at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. The review, by Holland Cotter, is from the Art & Design section of the New York Times.

Charlemagne comes to Switzerland

Visitors to Zurich, Switzerland may want to visit a new exhibit at the Swiss National Museum entitled Charlemagne and Switzerland, opening September 2013. Art Daily has a review.

Cornell seminar and lecture series focuses on medieval cosmology

A grant from the Cornell Institute for European Studies has financed a new working group at the university on medieval cosmology. Three scholars, Benjamin Anderson, Courtney Roby and Andrew Hicks, will bring the concept to the campus through a seminar and a series of lectures beginning in September and ending in November 2013.

High-class tableware among finds at Ewell site

Roman Ewell, in Surrey, England, was once located along the Stane Street, between London and Chichester, and acted as a market center, suppling travelers with accommodations and food for their journeys. Now the Church Meadow Project is taking a look at the 2nd century site and what it can tell experts about its history. (photos)

Late Roman well offers insight into technology

A well-preserved, late-Roman well near Heslington, England demonstrates use of the latest technology of the time, including curved stone facings and a dish-shaped base. Archaeologists from the University of York believe the well had "significance in contemporary local agricultural cycles and fertility practices."

Camira, star of Swords and Sabres Pirate Renaissance Fair

"Regal is a good word for her," said Kim Dudek about falcon Camira, the mascot of the Swords and Sabres Pirate Renaissance Fair in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Alexandra Paul of the Winnipeg Free Press has the story. (photo)

Rose and Butterfly Tournament video online

Don Conchobhar mac Michil, of the Kingdom of Artemisia, reports that he has uploaded a series of rapier videos shot at the 10th Rose and Butterfly Tournament, at the Uprising event. The videos are available on You Tube.

The stonemasons of Lincoln

Medieval cathedrals are awe-inspiring. Equally inspiring are the stonemasons and carvers who originally built the structures and who keep them maintained to this very day. The BBC has a short video on the stonemasons of Lincoln Cathedral, where construction began in the 11th century.

Modelling Mary

The team who created the 3D face of Richard III, have now been comissioned to produce a virtual face of Mary, Queen of Scots as she would have looked in her 20s. The image is part of the new exhibition at the Scottish National Museum in Edinburgh. (photo)

9th century church found beneath Dongola Citadel

A team of Polish archaeologists led by Prof. Włodzimierz Godlewski has discovered fragments of a medieval fortification system and the painted walls of a church, dating to the 9th century along the Nile River in the Sudan. Part of the Dongola Citadel, the medieval church survives alongside a tower and fortifications, dating to the 5th and 6th centuries, and remnants from the 15th century.

Laurels Prize Tourney 2013 photos online

Caelin on Andrede reports that he has created two albums of photos from Laurels Prize Tourney 2013, which took place recently in the Kingdom of Ansteorra. The photos are available on Flickr.

SCA: A good place to raise your kids

Prince Timothy of AEthelmearc has raised six children in the SCA. “It’s a good place to raise your kids and teach them a little something as time goes on,” he told Joan Mead-Matsui of the Abington Journal during the reporter's visit to Myrkfael Regional Melee Practice in the Barony of Endless Hills (Scott Township, Pennsylvania). (photos)

Two become Peers in Ansteorra

Estrill Swet reports that at Their recent event, Mooneschadowe's Triumphe, Their Majesties Lochlan and Gwen, of the Kingdom of Ansteorra, offered Peerages to two of Their subjects.