Excavations underway at St. Augustine, Florida

In 1565, St. Augustine was founded and became the first continuously-occupied European settlement in what would later become the continental United States. For the past 37 years, archaeologist Dr. Kathy Deagan of the University of Florida has spent her summers excavating the area of the "Fountain of Youth" and learn more about the early Spanish settlement. (video)

Blackstone Raids 2013 photos online

Augusto G. reports that he has created an album of photos from Blackstone Raids 2013, which took place recently in the Kingdom of AEthelmearc. The photos are available to view on Photobucket.

Flavius and Guillemette new Baron and Baroness of the Far West

Siobhan ni Seaghdha, Liaison to the Barony, reports that Flavius Artorius Gladius and Guillemette Chevalier have been chosen the new Baron and Baroness of the Far West.

The CalonSound Project presents new works from Johann Steinarsson

Three new recordings from Johann Steinarsson are now up at The CalonSound Project.

Be Entertained at Pennsic

Lady Lorelei Skye, Dean of the Performing Arts College at Pennsic, has released the final schedule for the Pennsic Performing Arts Tent and Ampitheater – and invites you to enjoy the many new and returning performers.

Seeking Volunteers for Known World Children's Fete - Pennsic 42

Herrin Emeludt Hänsler, one of the organizers of the Known World Children's Fete for Pennsic War, is appealing for volunteers to make this year's edition of the activity a success.

Q&A with Chirurgeon in Charge at Pennsic

As part of a series of Q&A articles with members of the Pennsic staff, Viscountess Caoilfhionn nic Dairmid, who is the Chirurgeon in Charge at Pennsic this year, answered questions for the East Kingdom Gazette.

Exploratory excavations at Clare Castle considered "exciting"

For nine days in the spring of 2013, volunteers joined archaeologists to work on four investigative trenches on the grounds of Clare Castle in Suffolk, England. The result was the discovery of human remains, leading experts to believe that a previously-unknown church existed on the property, possibly before the construction of the castle.

New Zealand Membership Services Website

Melissa Muckart, Acting Chair SCA (NZ) Inc., reports that a new website is now online for Membership Services in New Zealand.

Ancient gold figurine found in Danish field

A gold figurine of a bound, nude woman has been found in a farm field in Bornholm, Denmark. This is the fifth gold figurine found near each other in the same field. The woman dates to the 6th century CE.

Swear like a Roman

Facility in swearing is either an admirable or a deplorable ability, but all can agree that it is a trait with a long history. In her new book, Holy Sh*t! A Brief History of Swearing, Melissa Mohr outlines the history of the practice with emphasis on Roman times. Olga Khazan of the Atlantic has a review. PG-13.

The Mary Rose sails again in her new home

More than 30 years after the Mary Rose was pulled from the Solent, the ship continues to delight and educate both scholars and visitors to her new museum. In her new home, the Mary Rose can be viewed through three-story glass walls which display the interior of the ship, complete with dim lighting and "and groaning sounds of the sea outside." Eleanor Williams of BBC News has a feature story.

Medieval guide to witch hunting

What do you know about witches? Most modern ideas of witchcraft may come from a manuscript, one of only four known copies, found in the library of the University of Alberta. Treatise against the Sect of Waldensians, written in the 15th century, created the framework for witch hunts. Paul Kennedy of CBCRadio hosts an hour-long podcast on the book.

Middle schoolers learn at New Jersey Ren Fair

It was a day of fun and learning at Readington Middle School, along with the Holland Brook School, in Readington Township, New Jersey when Readington held its annual Renaissance Fair. Renée Kiriluk-Hill of the Hunterdon Democrat has the story.

The mind of the medieval reader

Who knows what people in the 14th century reador thought? MIT professor Arthur Bahr thinks he does.

Richard III generates first research paper

It must have been a race to the finish line, but the first academic paper to be published on the discovery of the remains of Richard III is The king in the car park: new light on the death and burial of Richard III in the Grey Friars church, Leicester, in 1485 by Richard Buckley, Mathew Morris, Jo Appleby, Turi King, Deirdre O'Sullivan, and Lin Foxhall.

Volunteers join experts to uncover Roman road in Wales

For three days, residents of Abergwyngregyn, Wales worked alongside archaeologists to uncover a portion of a Roman road, which once ran from Caerhun to Segontium. The road runs near the home of 13th century Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great and his grandson, the first Prince of Wales. (photo)

Metal detector loot returned to Irish museum

The discovery of historic artifacts using a metal detector has begun a popular pastime in Britain and Ireland, but some enthusiasts are using their equipment to discover and keep, or sell, their objects without permission. One such hobbyist died last year leaving nearly 1000 artifacts to be returned to their rightful owner, the National Museum of Ireland. (photos)

More on the art of Roman hair fashion

Baltimore hairdresser, and self-proclaimed "hairdo archaeologist," Janet Stephens, discusses her unique work with Roman hairstyles with the BBC while on a recent visit to London. (video)

Q&A with Andy Keleman, Director of SCA Web Ad

Andy Keleman, a commercial director based out of Pittsburgh, created a commercial for the SCA as his entry in a competition sponsored by Diners Club. He answered questions for the East Kingdom Gazette about creating the commercial with the SCA and his work.

Digitization of Vatican Library faces challenges

A year after the project's announcement, the firist digitized volumes of the Vatican Library are now available online. Experts began with the library's "most delicate" volumes, including "the Vatican’s 8,900 incunabula (books printed before 1501): the Sifra, a Hebrew manuscript written a millennia ago, a 4th century manuscript of the Greek Bible and the De Europa of Pope Pius II, printed around 1491."

"Dear Edward, Leave the Scots alone!"

A copy of a previously unknown letter from Robert the Bruce to King Edward II has been discovered at the British Library. The letter, written in 1310 during the build-up to the Battle of Bannockburn, requests that Edward recognise Scottish independence and end persecution of its people. (video)

Ansteorra's King's College photos online

Caelin on Andrede reports that photos from King's College, which took place recently in the Kingdom of Ansteorra, are now available to view online. The photos are on Flickr.

Whacks and wenches at Three Barons Renaissance Faire

Members of the Society for Creative Anachronism were on hand in early June for the 21st annual Three Barons Renaissance Fair in Anchorage, Alaska. Bill Roth of the Anchorage Daily News offers a photo album with highlights.

Balthasar Thiabold elevated to the Order of Chivalry

On the Legio Draconis website, his Grace Brannos reports that Captain Balthasar Thiabold of House Darkyard has been elevated to the Order of the Chivalry. The knighting took place June 23, 2013 at Baron Wars.

AEthelmearc fighters help kick off AC Celtic Festival

Participants in the first annual AC Celtic Festival in Wellsville, New York were treated to a demonstration of armored combat by members of the Society for Creative Anchronism. A representative of the Wellsville Daily Reporter was on hand to record the demo. (video)

New world duel may be the answer to colonial murder mystery

Excavations in 1996 at Jamestown, VA (USA) revealed that one of its earliest settlers died of a gunshot wound. Researchers now believe they have solved his murder. They believe the man was named George Harrison and that he was killed in a duel.

New Pelicans and Knight announced at Steppes Warlord

Snorri Hallsson reports that, at the Steppes Warlord event, Their Majesties Lochlann and Gwen of the Kingdom of Ansteorra placed three of Their subjects on vigil to contemplate elevation to Peerages.

Knights inspire reporter at Rhodes River Ranch

The Seattle Knights, a troupe of six professional knights, wowed the crowd and impressed a reporter from the UK Times at a recent show at the Rhodes River Ranch in Oso, Washington. A collection of AP photos is online.

Conference reflects new interest in King Arthur

In recent years, archaeologists have renewed their interest in finding the historic King Arthur. At the Footsteps of King Arthur Conference in Glastonbury, England, experts urged each other to keep looking, possibly as far north as Scotland.