Haverhill research center to be built over Roman farm

Archaeologists working on what will become the Haverhill Research Park have discovered artifacts ranging from the Iron Age to the 19th century on the site. The science research complex will be constructed on what was once a 2nd century Roman farm.

Irish Ogham stones digitized

Researchers of Ogham stones in Ireland may not have to actually travel to the country thanks to experts at the Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies, who have "used laser scanning equipment to capture and digitise more than 50 Ogham stones across the country." The Ogham 3D Project provides 3D images of Ogham stones from all around Ireland.

Viking gold "part of the big jigsaw of the history" in Ireland

Metal detector enthusiast Tom Crawford had a good day recently when he discovered a Viking gold ingot and a medieval silver ring brooch in a farmer's field in County Down, Northern Ireland. The ingot dates to the 9th and 10th centuries, while the brooch is somewhat later. (photo)

Monks chronicled 1200 years of volcanic activity

A new report, published in the journal Environmental Research Letters, finds that 1200 years of volcanic activity was chronicled in the texts of irish monks. The report was the work of an international team led by Dr Francis Ludlow from Harvard University.

"Nerdy" Danish teen finds Viking hoard

Friends of Danish teenager Michael Stokbro Larsen call him "nerdy," but the 16-year-old had the last laugh recently when he discovered a hoard of 365 artifacts from the Viking era including 60 coins bearing the imprint of King Harald Bluetooth. (photos)

The history of the humble hot dog

Baseball and picnic season lead many to think of the great summer food: the hot dog. On 2013 US Independence Day, The Week reporter Carmel Lobello took a look at the history of the humble dog, which will be consumed by the billions this summer alone.

Sozopol "vampire" gets a face

In 2012, a skeleton, buried with a ploughshare in its chest, was found in Sozopol, Bulgaria on the Black Sea. Now the "medieval vampire" has been given the facial reconstruction treatment by anthropologist Yordan Yordanov.

Looters unearth Byzantine church in Jordan

In most cases, looters are detrimental to archaeological sites, but recently in Jerash, Jordan, the criminals began the process that led to the discovery of a 6th century Byzantine church with an amazing mosaic floor.

Medieval house found near Conwy Castle in Wales

Workers from Dwr Cymru Welsh Water, digging a trench,  were surprised to find the remains of a medieval house and cesspit beneath Castle Street near Conwy Castle in Wales. The "incredibly important" find could "provide a new insight into medieval Conwy."

Lost Cortés letter found

A letter from Charles V to Hernán Cortés, proclaiming him Governor of Mexico, has been found in the State Archive in Naples. The letter is one of the oldest sent to the New World.

The weight of civic duty

Since 1954, John Mattick has carried the 16th century ceremonial sword  before the mayor at civic events in the Welsh city of  Carmarthen. Before that, his father carried it. Now it will be passed to his son. "It is a weighty thing to carry, and that's mainly why I'm having to give it up at my age," Mr Mattick said. (photo)

Rewriting Shakespeare

Many writers have re-interpreted the works of William Shakespeare, and a new project, The Hogarth Shakespeare, is just the latest. Launching in 2016 to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, the series will commission prominent authors to create "cover versions" of the Bard's plays.

Wrecked merchant ship salvaged off coast of Vietnam

After five long months of battling sand and seawater off the coast of the Binh Son district in Vietnam, experts have recovered a wealth of 14th century artifacts from a shipwreck, possibly associated with the silk and pottery road.

Our great big European family

Great Britain and continental Europe are just one, big family - at least genetically - according to a new study by Graham Coop, a professor of evolution and ecology at the University of California, Davis in PLoS Biology.

"Natural Jacuzzi" found in Turkey

“We never assumed we could find such a structure. It is a natural Jacuzzi from 1500 years ago," said Governor Abdülkadir Demir about the discovery of a thermal Turkish bath (hamam) in the province of Denizli.

New Leicester parking lot discovery

It's been quite a year for Leicester archaeologists. First there was the discovery of Richard III under a parking lot. Now a 3rd century Roman cemetery has been found under a second lot. The cemetery includes 13 burials -- both Christian and Pagan, an unusual practice at the time.

Seeking Volunteers for Known World Children's Fete - Pennsic 42

We are seeking the help of volunteers with this years Known World Children's Fete at Pennsic. The Fete will be on July 31, 2013 from 1:00pm to 4:00pm at the Great Hall. Can you sing a song, dance a jig, paint a face, smile and laugh a lot, color a picture, have fun or any sort of other activities? Then we could use you.

Richard's new army

An army of 100, some dressed in medieval garb, marched on the city of York recently in support of their king, Richard III. Led by Vanessa Roe, the king's 16th great niece, the march was a "moral crusade" to bring Richard's body back to Yorkshire where, according to Roe, he washed to be buried. (photo and video)

Traffic Detour to Pennsic

Mistress Jessa, via the East Kingdom Gazette, reports on traffic conditions at the approach to Pennsic War.

Tolkien and Arthur

In the early 1930s J. R. R. Tolkien, author of the Lord of the Rings trilogy and the Hobbit, began what was to have been an epic, narrative poem, The Fall of Arthur, only to abandon the work in 1937. Now the incomplete poem has been published, edited by Tolkien's son Christopher.

New Battle of Hastings book neglects sources, says History Today reviewer

Marc Morris, author of The Norman Conquest, finds some of the facts in a new history of the subject by John Grehan and Martin Mace "uncomfortable." The Battle of Hastings 1066: The Uncomfortable Truth places the site of the famous battle at a different location, Caldbec Hill. His review is on the History Today website.

Life of Elizabeth Woodville dramatized on BBC One

Best-selling historical novelist Philippa Gregory has inspired a new series, currrently running on BBC One, which tells the stories of Elizabeth Woodville, Margaret Beaufort and Anne Neville. The White Queen is based on Gregory's series The Cousin’s War.

Viking "compass" may have calculated latitude

In a new study in the Proceedings of The Royal Society A, researcher Balázs Bernáth and his team propose that Viking-era sun compasses, whose "lines don't quite match scientists' interpretations," may have had another purpose: calculating latitude. (photo, diagram)

Lindisfarne Gospels on display in Durham

Until September 30, 2013, the Lindisfarne Gospels book will be on display in Durham University's Palace Green Library as the centerpiece of  an exhibition of artifacts from Anglo-Saxon England. In conjunction with the exhibit will be performances and family activities.

Stefan's Florilegium updates for July 2013

THLord Stefan li Rous reports that he has published updates to Stefan's Florilegium for July 2013.

East Kingdom Gazette Pennsic Articles

The East Kingdom Gazette has created a page which lists all its articles related to Pennsic and links to the articles.

"Bards welcome"

How do bards know when a private camp at the upcoming Pennsic War is welcoming to entertainers? Pelayo of the Kingdom of Ealdormere has the answer.

"Oh Yeah? My Dad can beat up your Dad!” Tourney Pennsic XLII

Baron Richard Larmer of the Kingdom of Ealdormere reports that a tournament "for Dads inspired by their children to earn renown on the field" will be held Saturday, 27 July, 2013 at Pennsic 42.

Q&A with Dean of the Pennsic School of European Dance

The East Kingdom Gazette interviews Honorable Lady Margherita Battistina, Dean of the School of European Dance.

Q&A with the Pennsic Watch’s Deputy Mayor

The East Kingdom Gazette continues their series of interview articles with members of the Pennsic staff.