Medieval handbell re-created

Archaeologists know what early medieval handbells looked like from the "rusty shadows in the museum case" that still exist, but not what these bells sounded like. Now a team of experts from the National Museum of Scotland has re-created such a bell, "used by Scottish monks more than 1,000 years ago." (photo)

Time flies in Euro-history video

The history of Europe is... complicated, as anyone who has studied it can confirm. A short animated film from LiveLeak, entitled Map of Europe: 1000 AD to present day, can help understand the ebbs and flows of the nations.

Archaeologists consider meaning of Mingary Castle arrowhead

Mingary Castle, overlooking the Sound of Mull in Scotland, may have had a more violent past than once believed, according to experts pondering the discovery of an iron arrowhead. (photo)

"Lost" medieval village found beneath Southwell

Archaeologist Matt Beresford is hoping that his team will find conclusive evidence that a "lost" pre-Norman village may be found beneath the streets of the Nottinghamshire town of Southwell. The project was being funded by a UK£5,800 Heritage Lottery grant. (photos)

"We are the collateral descendants of Richard III, we speak on behalf of him"

The Plantagenet Alliance has not given up. They want the bones of their king. Who are these people? "We are the collateral [non-direct] descendants of Richard III, we speak on behalf of him, the only people who can speak on behalf of him," replied Vanessa Roe, the group's spokesperson.

Notes from Fourth Quarter BoD Meeting

The East Kingdom Gazette has published notes of the fourth quarter Board of Directors meeting.

The synopsis of the meeting can be found at the link below. This is not an official publication of the SCA Inc. nor the East Kingdom.

Roman temple near Hadrian's Wall identified

The remains of a building near Hadrian's Wall, dating to the second century and first unearthed in the 1880s by a local archaeologist, have been identified as a Roman temple. The temple is the most north western classical temple from the Roman world yet discovered.

Bid made to analyze bones of Alfred the Great

In 2010, the Hyde900 community group was set up to celebrate the 900th anniversary of the founding of Hyde Abbey, the presumed burial place of King Alfred the Great. Now the organization has appled to have the remains of the King analyzed in order to prove their legitimacy.

"Lost" Jewish cemetery found in Vienna

In 1943, Nazis encouraged the destruction of the gravestones in Vienna's oldest Jewish cemetery. Now through the use of ground-penetrating radar, some of the stones, dating back to the 16th century, have been re-discovered.

Luther pamphlets stolen from museum in Eisenach

Officials at the Lutherhaus museum in Eisenach, Germany were shocked to learn that three original 16th century printed pamphlets by Martin Luther had been stolen from the museum July 12, 2013. The pamphlets included hand-written notes by contemporaries of Luther.

Will excavations at Grey Friars uncover headless bodies of executed monks?

80 years before Ricard III was buried at Leicester's Grey Friars church, three friars were beheaded by Henry IV for spreading rumors about the continued life of the deposed Richard II. Now archaeologists hope to solve the mystery by discovering their graves.

Arabs slam Vikings in historic texts

"They are the filthiest of all Allah’s creatures: they do not purify themselves after excreting or urinating or wash themselves when in a state of ritual impurity after coitus and do not even wash their hands after food," wrote Arab writer Ahmad ibn Fadlan about his encounter with Vikings in areas around the Caspian Sea and the Volga River.

Happy birthday, Giovanni Boccaccio

Through 20 December 2013, the University of Manchester and Bristol will celebrate the 700th anniversary of the birth of Giovanni Boccaccio, author of the 1351 Decameron, a collection of 100 tales ranging from the erotic to the tragic, with an exhibition.

"Vampire" graves found in Poland

Archaeologists in Poland, investigating a roadway construction site, have discovered a group of what they consider "vampire" graves containing skeletons whose heads have been severed from their bodies and placed at their feet, "a ritualized execution designed to ensure the dead stayed dead."

Archaeological survey hopes to locate War of the Roses battlefield

Historical documents show that in 1460 a decisive battle took place on the grounds of Northampton's Delapre Abbey, leading to Yorkist Edward lV taking the throne of England, but the actual site of the battle has never been identified. Now archaeologists hope to locate the site before the area becomes a sports field.

15th century plague hospital to be covered by Apple store

Some residents of Madrid are less than thrilled that a new Apple store will be opening atop the ruins of a 15th century plague hospital. The 20,000-square-foot store is scheduled to open its doors in December 2013, covering the ruins of the medieval building.

Mars discoveries tweeted in Latin

It's only fitting that Mars, the Roman god of war, would be the subject of NASA's first official venture into the world of Latin social media with photos of the surface of the planet taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Latin captions were sent August 28, 2013 on Tumblr, Twitter and Facebook.

Getty Museum announces Open Content Program

Nearly 5,000 high-resolution images of artworks from the Getty Museum's collections are now available in digital format "free to use, modify, and publish for any purpose" as part of the museum's Open Content Program.

Archaeologists wish for project to protect Roman mosaics

Nearly 50 years ago, archaeologists uncovered a pair of beautiful mosaic floors, dating to the Roman era, at Chedworth Villa in Gloucestershire, England. Now the floors have been uncovered for study, leading to a discussion of a permanent building to house them. (photo)

Gepa of Sundragon becomes Pelican in Atenveldt

At Their Court at the recent Chocaloate revel event, Their Majesties Ivan and Ian'ka of the Kingdom of Atenveldt offered elevation to the order of the Pelican to Lady Gepa of Sundragon.

Queen's Champion 2013 photos online

Caelin on Andrede reports that he has posted two albums of photos from Queen's Champion, which took place October 5, 2013 in the Barony of Stargate, Ansteorra. The photos are available on Flickr.

Ten ways to know you'e getting "Middle Aged"

In a recent post on her Confessions of a Geek Queen, Diane Morrison, D&D player and SCA member, shares thoughts on being middle-aged in the Middle Ages.

Viking sword from Isle of Man on display

Showcased at the ongoing Heroes exhibition at the Jorvik Viking Centre in York are the fragments of a highly-decorated Viking sword, discovered in 2008 by metal detector enthusiasts Rob Farrer and Daniel Crowe on the Isle of Man. The sword dates to the 10th century. (photo)

The historic beauty of Rouen

Rouen, france is the home of the Cathedral Notre-Dame de Rouen and of Gustave Flaubert, the spot where Joan of Arc was burned and where painters Claude Monet and Roy Lichtenstein were inspired. Nell Casey of the New York Times visited the city and writes of its beauty. (photos)

Pictures: Ansteorra Coronation and Dyeing Symposium

Caelin on Andrede reports that he has posted several albums of photos from Coronation, which took place recently in the Kingdom of Ansteorra. Also recently posted was a photo album from Dyeing Symposium. The photos are available on Flickr.

The "Formula 1" of jousting events

Stacey Evans is a world-class jouster. As Sir Edward Stacey, he took part recently in a medieval joust at Carisbrooke Castle, a motte-and-bailey structure, on the Isle of Wight. Stacy was interviewed in a short video from the BBC.

SCA - not LARPing!

At a demo of SCA armored combat by the Iron Brigade, interviewer Homer learns the difference between medieval armored combat and LARPing. The interview took place at the 2013 San Diego ComicCon.

Archaeologists search for graves at Flodden

In September 1513, thousands of bodies were buried on or around the battlefield of Flodden in Northumberland, England. Now, 500 years later, excavation has taken place to locate and protect the remains and to declare the burials as war dead.

Rethinking Henry VIII

For 500 years, Henry VIII has had a reputation as a womanizing villain, but TV historian Dr Lucy Worsley has a different view: Henry was a family kind of guy who just wanted to settle down with a good woman.

Dame Jane Beaumont elevated to Laurel in Gleann Abhann

Dame Dredda reports that, at Morning Court, Their Majesties of the Kingdom of Gleann Abhann offered elevation to the Order of the Laurel to Dame Jane Beaumont.