Calontiri elevated at Lilies War

In June 2014, the Falcon Banner of the Kingdom of Calontir announced the elevation of several of the Kingdom's subjects by the hands of Their Majesties Martino and Ariel.

New discoveries show Pictish heritage in Scotland

The Romans called the people of the north the "Painted Ones" due to their woad body painting, but little is known about the Pictish civilization. Now archaeologists working in Scotland's northern highlands have found evidence that the area may have been the people's power center.

Research links for English and Anglo-Saxon names and personas

On his blog Wulfhere's Devices, Calontir herald Wulfhere of Eofeshamme offers help on researching English and Anglo-Saxon names and personas.

Medieval fighting breaks out in Spain

BBC Magazine reporter Tom Holland was prepared to be disappointed when he attended the recent First International Medieval Combat Federation World Championships at Belmonte Castle in Spain. After all he'd been to re-enactments before, but he quickly changed his mind.

Vlad rests in Italian soil?

New research may show that the remains of Count Vlad Tepes, a.k.a. Dracula, may not be buried in romania, but in Naples, Italy. scholars from the University of Tallinn believe they have found evidence that the nobleman was "taken prisoner, ransomed to his daughter - by then safe in Italy - and buried in a church in Naples."

Great Northeastern War 2014 photos online

Brita reports that she has created an album of photos from the Great Northeastern War 2014, which took place recently in the Kingdom of the East. The photos are available to view on Shutterfly.

SCA Banners Fly at Worldcon, London

Guy De Dinan reports on the extensive medievalist and SCA activities at the recently-concluded World Science Fiction and Fantasy Convention ("Worldcon") held in London.

Treasures of Scotland revealed

2013 was a "magnificent" year for archaeologists in Scotland. The recent annual Scottish Treasure Trove report, covering 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014, by Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer (QLTR) Catherine Dyer shows a variety of items including gold jewelry, coins and a Roman wine dipper. (photos)

Decoding Anglo-Saxon art

People have long admired the beautiful Anglo-Saxon artifacts found in the burial mounds of Sutton Hoo, but few understand the symbols embedded within the metal. Rosie Weetch, a curator at the British Museum, offers an illuminating primer on how to decode the symbols and stories in a piece of Anglo-Saxon metalwork on the British Museum blog. (photos and diagrams)

Fun with the old masters

Do you think Renaissance masterpieces are just boring, dusty paintings? Collage artist James Kerr doesn't - and proves it with his creation of a number of animated GIFs using works of the great masters.

Location of Llanllyr nunnery discovered in Wales

Sometime in the late 12th century, Rhys ap Gruffudd founded a daughter house to the convent of Strata Florida in the Aeron Valley of wales. Researchers have known about the Llanllyr nunnery, but never its precise location - until now when excavations in Ceredigion have revealed the convent as well as a cemetery and Tudor mansion.

Rare Ethelbert penny found in Sussex field

King Ethelbert II was murdered, possibly for minting his own coins. Now an extremely-rare, 8th century silver penny, found by metal detectorist Darrin Simpson, has been discovered in a Sussex, England field. (photo)

Remains of Black Shuck found in ruins of Leiston Abbey?

An old legend in Suffolk, England, tells of a massive black dog, known as Black Shuck, which terrorized the village folk, and was the subject of a report in 1577 by the Reverend Abraham Fleming. Now archaeologists believe they have found the remains of a huge dog buried in the area. (photo)

Lincoln Castle reveals Saxon buried in his boots

The UK£22 million renovtion of Lincoln Castle continues to unearth medieval treasures, this time with the discovery of a high-status Saxon burial  in a church wall. The remains showed a powerful man, suffering from rickets, who was buried in his boots.

Shire of Blackhawk sponsors Newcomers’ Night

On June 19, 2014, the Shire of Blackhawk, the local chapter of the Society for Creative Anachronism in Rockford, Illinois, invited those interested in the Middle Ages to join them at the Northwest Community Center’s Corbett Building for hands-on activities practiced by the group. The Rock River Times published the invitation. (photo)

Vindolanda Nero coin "a special find"

Archaeologists working at Vindolanda, the Roman fort in northeastern England, made a "special" find recently: a rare gold coin bearing the image of Roman emperor Nero, the first gold coin found during the excavation's 40-year history. (photo)

"Holy Grail" stolen in Wales

The Nanteos Cup is missing. Rumored to be the Holy Grail, brought to Britain by Joseph of Arimathea, the olive wood cup is normally kept in a bank vault in Wales, but was loaned to an ailing women in Weston-Under-Penyard. It was stolen from her home July 14, 2014. (photo)

Remains of Henry VII of Luxembourg buried with rare silk cloth

Researchers in Italy have the rare opportunity to examine and analyze the remains of Henry VII of Luxembourg, German king and Holy Roman emperor, who died in 1313 and is buried in Pisa Cathedral. The remains were exhuned in 2013 to determine the emperor’s physical features and cause of death. (photos)

"What's Up" with A&S in Drachenwald?

For issue 8 of What's Up Wednesday, the A&S blog for the Kingdom of Drachenwald, the topic is sewing, featuring some amazing projects created by artisans of the Kingdom.

Newstead Abbey to receive grant from World Monuments Fund

In 1540, the Byron family, ancestors of the famous Lord Byron, was given Newstead Abbey near Nottingham, England. Built in the 12th century, the abbey has since fallen into disrepair, and it has become the recipient of UK£40,000 from the World Monuments Fund to save the crumbling structure.

Viking amulet features detailed dress

Experts in Denmark are intrigued by the recent discovery of a Viking Age amulet/figurine by a metal detectorist in a field near Revninge. The small silver figurine, possibly representing Freya the goddess of fertility, wears a marvelously-detailed Viking dress. (photo)

Medieval sewer system found at Drum Castle

Archaeologists working on a dig at Drum Castle in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, have discovered the remains of the medieval sanitation system which once surrounded the 14th-century Tower of Drum.

Lilies War 28 photos online

Sofya reports that a number of photo albums from Lilies War 28 are now available on the Calontiri website.

Mirabel de Malmesberie elevated to Laurel in the Outlands

Kaliyan Kali reports that at Their Caer Galen Defender event, Their Majesties Walrick and Cecilia, of the Kingdom of the Outlands, offered elevation to the Order of the Laurel to the Honorable Lady Mirabel de Malmesberie.

Earliest case of Down syndrome diagnosed in French skeleton

A team of archaeologists at the University of Bordeaux has identified the earliest known case of Down syndrome in the remains of a child who lived in 6th century France. The diagnosis was made after the remains were submitted to a (CT) scan.

Mystery of Wolsey's missing angels solved

Once upon a time, four bronze angels adorned the gateposts of the Wellingborough Golf Club in Northamptonshire, England. No one paid much attention to them until two were stolen, but now all four, identified as Renaissance treasures, are the subject of a fundraising effort by the Victoria and Albert Museum. (photo)

The Known World Arts & Sciences display at Pennsic

SleepyUnicorn has posted a photo album from the Known World A&S Display held at Pennsic 43.

Oldest copy of "The Brus" restored

The oldest known copy of "The Brus," an epic poem describing the Battle of Bannockburn, has been restored in time for the 700th celebration of the event. The poem was written in 1375 by the Archdeacon of Aberdeen. (photos)

Chaninai al-Zarqa' bint Ibrahim ibn Rashid elevated to Pelican in the West

Gillian reports that Their Majesties Conor and Isa of the Kingdom of the West have chosen to elevate her protégé, Chaninai al-Zarqa' bint Ibrahim ibn Rashid, to the Order of the Pelican.

Shishido Tora Gozen elevated to Pelican in AEthelmearc

In June 2014, Their Majesties Tindal and Etain of the Kingdom of AEthelmearc offered elevation to the Order of the Pelican to Shishido Tora Gozen. The elevation too place at the Kingdom's Equestrian Championship.