Archaeologists search for graves at Flodden

In September 1513, thousands of bodies were buried on or around the battlefield of Flodden in Northumberland, England. Now, 500 years later, excavation has taken place to locate and protect the remains and to declare the burials as war dead.

Rethinking Henry VIII

For 500 years, Henry VIII has had a reputation as a womanizing villain, but TV historian Dr Lucy Worsley has a different view: Henry was a family kind of guy who just wanted to settle down with a good woman.

Dame Jane Beaumont elevated to Laurel in Gleann Abhann

Dame Dredda reports that, at Morning Court, Their Majesties of the Kingdom of Gleann Abhann offered elevation to the Order of the Laurel to Dame Jane Beaumont.

Galileo ice debate continues

Why does ice float on water? This was the subject of debate between Galileo and his arch-enemy Lodovico delle Colombe during the summer of 1611, which brought into focus some of the odd properties of water.

University of Leicester offers free course on Richard III

Starting November 25, 2013, the University of Leicester and FutureLearn will offer a free, online history course entitled "England in the time of King Richard III." The six-week course is the first history offering from FutureLearn, and will be taught by Deirdre O’Sullivan, Lecturer in Medieval Archaeology from the University of Leicester.

Three offered Peerages in Ansteorra

Detlef von Marburg, Zodiacus Herald, reports that at Their Coronation, Their Majesties Aaron and Nicollet of the Kingdom of Ansteorra chose to offer elevation to the Peerage to three of Their subjects.

Introducing Hernán Cortés

Arguably, Hernán Cortés is the most famous - or infamous - of the Spanish explorers. Jessie Szalay, LiveScience Contributor, offers a biographical feature on the conqueror of the Aztec Empire and governor of New Spain.

500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden marked

14,000 individuals -- 10,000 Scots and 4,000 English -- lost their lives in the Battle of Flodden which took place in 1513 in Northumberland, England. Among them was King James IV of Scotland. This year re-enactors and others are marking the 500th anniversary of the history-changing battle. (photo)

Earl of Sandwich risked health with frozen chocolate delight

In 1668, the Earl of Sandwich collected recipes for chocolate, a treat just introduced to England believed to be "unwholesome." His iced chocolate recipes are a highlight of a paper by Dr Kate Loveman of the University of Leicester entitled The Introduction of Chocolate into England: Retailers, Researchers, and Consumers, 1640–1730.

Stefan's Florilegium updates for October 2013

THLord Stefan li Rous has posted updates for Stefan's Florilegium for October 2013.

Connecticut faire-goers risk "excessive jubilation"

Visitors to the Connecticut Renaissance Faire, in Norwich, have the chance to chat with King Henry VIII, but also risk getting slapped with a ticket from the faire's sherrif for "excessive jubilation." The faire runs through October 20, 2013.

Konrad and Kortland new Heirs to Artemisia Thrones

Duke Alan reports that Duke Sir Konrad von Krixen was the victor of the October 5, 2013 Crown Tournament in the Kingdom of Artemisia. His Grace was inspired in his endeavor by Duchess Kortland Stirling Mayfaire.

Duke Prothell Wolfbane wins Drachenwald Fall 2013 Crown Tournament

Pól ó Briain report that Duke Prothell Wolfbane was victorious in the Fall 2013 Crown Tournament in the Kingdom of Drachenwald. His Grace was inspired in his endeavor by Duchess Cecilia Jonsdottir.

Thorfinn and Violante new Prince and Princess of the West

Baron Khevron reports that Thorfinn the Cruel, inspired by Violante Seraph, was the winner of the October 5, 2013 Crown Tournament in the Kingdom of the West.

From the Society Seneschal - New Sanction Guide comments sought

Sir Modius von Mergentheim, Society Seneschal, reports that comments are requested on the SCA's new sanction guide. The deadline for comment is December 28, 2013.

Will and Kate's conjugal arms

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II has approved the conjugal arms of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, a combination of the coats of arms of the Royal Family and the Middleton arms.

SCA "did well” at McMaster University Clubsfest

Freshman at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, recently had the opportunity to learn about over three hundred campus organizations at Clubsfest, the annual outdoor fair. Among the groups represented were the Renaissance Dance Club and the local chapter of the SCA. Josh Dehaas of Macleans has the story.

Byzantine pilgrimage site found in the Sudan

The excavation of the medieval monastery al-Ghazali in Northern Sudan is astonishing archaeologists who have unearthed a second church on the site as well as a large number of fragments of funerary stelae and inscribed vessels. The monastery is believed to have been a major pilgrimage site before the 13th century. (photos)

Society Seasonal Archery Competition

Archers of the Known World are invited to participate in the Fall Society Archery Competition, currently in progress around the SCA. Sir Jon Fitz-Rauf introduces the competition.

Re-living history at the Michiana Renaissance Festival

Kamm Island Park in Mishawaka, Indiana became the "Kingdom of Kamm" recently when the Michiana Renaissance Festival came to town. Tricia Harte of WNDU - Channel 16 - in South Bend hosts three videos on the Faire.

The history of the octothorpe and more

Modern social networkers will recognize the octothrope as the opening character of a hashtag, but the lowly punctuation mark has a noble history. In his book, Shady Characters: The Secret Life of Punctuation, Symbols & Other Typographical Marks, Keith Houston looks at punctuation marks' roots from Greek, Roman and 14th century texts.

The Coronation of Kenric II and Avelina II

The East Kingdom Gazette provides a full account, with pictures, of last weekend's coronation of Kenric II and Avelina II at Barony of the Bridge.

Charles Brandon's falconry vervel shows royal connection

Charles Brandon, the first duke of Suffolk, was a great chum of Henry VIII. In fact, he married Henry's sister Mary. Evidence of this royal connection was discovered recently in the form of a silver vervel found in a Norfolk, England field.

Freer/Sackler Galleries receive grant for Chinese art conservator

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery and Freer Gallery of Art of the Smithsonian in Washigton D.C. have received a US$1 million challenge grant, awarded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, to endow the position of an assistant Chinese painting conservator.

The Passing of a Gentle Giant - Master El of the Two Knives

Master El of the Two Knives, one of the founders of the East Kingdom, passed away on October 1, 2013 after a long illness. He will be remembered for his kindness and his long years of service.

Boat burials might help solve mystery of Viking trading center

To most historians, Steinkjer was just a name mentioned in the Norse Sagas, but new evidence discovered in two boat graves in Lø, Norway, may have solved the puzzle of the mysterious trading center.

Bath Abbey threatened by its dead

Bath Abbey, the late 15th century church that looms over the Roman ruins in Bath, England, is under siege -- by the dead. Not zombies, but over 6,000 bodies, threaten to lift the abbey's floor and collapse the building.

Remains of Irish mother and children considered "significant"

Experts from the Caherconnell Archaeological School are pondering the discovery of the remains of a “45-year-old plus” woman" and two infants beneath the remains of the 10th century cashel (fort). The archaeologists believe that the remains belong to a wealthy family, possibly the local Gaelic rulers, the O’Loughlins.

Priory and brewhouse excavation tell story of monks' lives

The land under social services and government buildings in Bicester, England once belonged to a community of monks who worked the land and may have partaken of as much as "10 pints of beer a week."

New book relocates Battle of Bosworth

For centuries, everyone knew that the Battle of Bosworth, which led to the death of Richard III and the ascendence of the Tudors, took place on Ambion Hill, but new research by Glenn Foard and Anne Curry places the site two miles away by a marsh called Fen Hole.