Cheapside Hoard scores dedicated exhibition at the Museum of London

In 1912, a tenement building in Cheapside, in the heart of London, was demolished, unearthing one of the rariest treasures in the city's history. Vivienne Becker, of the Telegraph, offers a feature on the Cheapside Hoard, currently on display at the Museum of London. (photos and video)

Bryn Gwlad 2013 photos online

Caelin on Andrede reports that he has created an album of photos from Bryn Gwlad which took place recently in the Kingdom of Ansteorra. The photos are available to view on Flickr.

Shoshana Drakere made Laurel in Atenveldt

Mistress Anya Sergeeva reports that Their Majesties Ivan and Ian'ka of the Kingdom of Atenveldt offered elevation to the Order of the Laurel to Her Ladyship Shoshana Drakere.

Oldest wine cellar discovered

Israeli and American archaeologists have uncovered what may have been the world's oldest wine cellar in the Galilee, Business Standard reports. The cellar is estimated to be about 3,700 years old and to have held up to 2,000 liters of strong, sweet wine.

Archaeologists ponder Swedish "murder mystery"

"It's like Pompeii: Something terrible happened, and everything just stopped," said Helene Wilhelmson, a researcher from Sweden's Lund University about the recent discovery of a well-preserved fort on the island of Öland, just off the Swedish coast, which contained a number of skeletons.

Donna Page joins SCA Ltd Board of Directors

Laurence Cooke/Paidin MacLorkan, SCA Ltd. Secretary (Australia), reports that Donna Page/Lady Gabriella Borromei has been named to the Board of Directors of SCA Ltd.

Roman skulls unearthed by "lost" London river

The Walborn River used to run through London until it was paved over in the 15th century. Recently the river made it's presence known when 20 skulls, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, were discovered washed from a Roman burial site.

SCAdian joins the crew for Pirates of The High Seas Festival

Marcel Hildebrand is a pirate, or at least he was recently when he participated in the Pirates of The High Seas Festival at Pier Park in Panama City Beach, Florida. Scott Carroll of the News Herald spoke to Hildebrand and Steve Bailey, director of the Convention and Visitors Bureau, when he visited the festival. (photo)

Mathematics used to measure sociability of the Vikings

Pádraig Mac Carron and Ralph Kenna from Coventry University's Applied Mathematics Research Centre recently published an article in the European Physical Journal on the social relationships of Vikings, showing them to have more complex social networks than previously believed.

Adhemar and Sorcha new Heirs to Throne of Meridies

Jerusha reports that Lord Adhemar was the winner of the October 12, 2013 Crown Tournament in the Kingdom of Meridies. The new prince was inspired by His new princess Sorcha.

Horse and rider return to Mildenhall

In 1997, the remains of an Anglo Saxon warrior and his horse were discovered, along with over 400 other graves, at RAF Lakenheath in Suffolk, England. Now the horse and rider have come home for display at the Mildenhall Museum.

"History Lives" in The Dalles

Visitors to City Park in The Dalles, Oregon were met by people from another time when they encountered members of the Society for Creative Anachronism's "History Lives" demo. A reporter from The Dalles Chronicle has photos and video.

15th century "pop-up" book

On his Tumblr page, Dutch book historian Erik Kwakkel features a 15th century "pop-up" book, complete with a three dimensional illustration of the phases of the moon. (photo)

Northern Horde invades New Zealand

Usually Tauranga, New Zealand's Northern Horde can be found on Sunday afternoons at Memorial Park, but for one Sunday, they opened their practice to the public and let everyone play. The Horde’s Captain Charlie Tapsell has participated on New Zealand's team in the international Battle of the Nations. (photo and video)

Duke Martino Michele Veneri wins Calontir Fall 2013 Crown

Catrijn reports that Duke Martino Michele Veneri, fighting for Duchess Ariel of Glastonbury Tor, was the victor of the recent Crown Tournament in the Kingdom of Calontir.

Cross fragment leads to search for Anglo Saxon village

The discovery of part of a stone cross, dating to Anglo Saxon times, has excited archaeologists from Altogether Archaeology excavating St Botolph’s field in Frosterley in Weardale, England. “This is not the kind of thing that happens every day," said Paul Frodsham, historic environment officer at the North Pennines Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) Partnership.

Stefan's Florilegium updates for November 2013

THLord Stefan li Rous offers updates to Stefan's Florilegium for November 2013.

SCA 50 Year Survey

The stewards of the SCA 50th Year Celebration have produced a survey inviting input into the activities to be included at the event.

Siegfried and Elizabeth new Northshield Heirs

Gwen reports that Duke Siegfried von Kalmbach was the victor of the October 12, 2013 Crown Tournament in the Kingdom of Northshield. His Grace was inspired in his endeavor by Countess Elizabeth von Kulmbach.

Newcomers' Portal announced

The Society would like to announce the launch of our new Online Newcomers' Portal! This interactive, media-rich website will provide an engaging new way for those discovering our organization to learn more about us, get excited about what we do, and get in touch with local branches.

Aristocratic burials found at Polish dig

Archaeologists working on excavations in Burdąg, Warmia and Mazury, Poland have discovered rich burials dating to the 6th and 7th centuries. Believed to have belonged to local aristocrats, the graves contained such artifacts as a silver breastplate, glass beads and silver fibulae. (photo)

Cambridge University lawbreakers catalogued

Jacky Cox, Cambridge University's archivist, has a monumental job ahead of her: creating the first catalogue of thousands of court records from the 16th and 17th centuries, chronicling the misdeeds of students, staff and townspeople attached to the university. About half of the records from Vice-Chancellor's Court (1540-1630) are now summarised online.

Newport Arch to be restored

A 3rd century Roman arch in Lincoln, England, damaged by the country's recent cold and wet winters, will be restored through a UK£60,000 grant by the Waste Recycling Environmental Limited. The Newport Gate, which in Roman times was the gateway north to York, led to the suburb of Newport during the Middle Ages. (photo)

3rd century shop found at Roman Maryport

Archaeologists working at Roman Maryport, along Hadrian's Wall, have discovered evidence of six buildings and a road. One of the buildings is believed to have been a Roman shop.

New sources on the Battle of Crécy

The October 2013 issue of History Today magazine features an article by Richard Barber which looks at recently discovered sources on the Battle of Crécy (1346). An excerpt from Edward III and the Battle of Crécy is available free online. The entire article is reserved for subscribers to the magazine. (photo)

"Secrets of the Viking Sword" available online

In case you missed the presentation of PBS' Nova: Secrets of the Viking Sword, the program is available to view on the PBS website.

Modern monk accepts tonsure for charity

Re-enacting Ancient Times Society member Matthew Routledge, of March, England, has played Friar Tuck before, but this time he is serious. Routledge is taking on the part of the monk to raise money for the Stroke Association. Elaine King of the Standard 24 has the story.

Re-enactor strives to survive on a 9th century farm

Pavel Sapozhnikov of Khotkovo is undertaking an experiement in history this winter by seeking to survive a tough, Russian winter "in a 9th-century environment, with no access to electricity, the Internet or other modern amenities." Dmitry Vinogradov of RIA Novosti has the story.

The light of medieval times

In a 2013 paper, published in volume 4 of i-Perception on perceptionweb.com, Claus-Christian Carbon and Pia Deininger look at the role and perception of light in the medieval world. The paper is entitled Golden perception: Simulating perceptual habits of the past.

"Rare, multifunctional oven" found in England

"It's almost certainly a rare, multifunctional oven, with a shelf like a pizza oven for bread, and you could have finished off the malting process for barley and dried grain," said Dr John Jolleys about the discovery of a 1,300-year-old Anglo-Saxon oven in Sedgeford, England. (photo)