The Rede of Sarnac

Master Aaron Faheud Swiftrunner of the Stone Keep has written this touching tribute to Count Sir Sarnac, who passed away earlier this week in Ealdormere.

The King did call his jester, but the jester never came
The King did need his warlord but the needing was in vain
The King called for the great Heart beating in the wood
All these folk would hasten nigh if and when they could

The King had need of folding steel singing on the wind
The King had need of mighty arm to lift him up again
The King had need of chivalry and a golden ring
The King had need of Sarnac for all those many things.

The Novices upon the field serving well their lord
The Novices lifting shield by inland sea and fjord
Runestone dwells beneath a tree and song will linger there
Singing of the many things Sarnac had to share.

Every smile that found a home with a passer-by
Every laugh upon the wind to make a spirit fly
Every cheer for trilliums grown so well in bloom
And kisses for Jolecia, beloved of her groom

Northern lands are quieter for the space behind
Left by he who had another road he had to find
Though upon that road we hear the tread of mighty feet
They return to watch over dear Amber as she sleeps

Close your eyes and think upon the never ending smile
Close your eyes and thank the Gods for the many miles
He walked with us and fought with us and drank with us and more
They surely are a reason to be ever thankful for.

The empty place where he stood, none can ever fill
Though a thousand come and try no one ever will.
For each and every one of us who knew him raise a glass
Thankful he was with us, and in sorrow that he passed

In Ealdormere in forest deep you will hear a song
Sung by all the people he brought and cheered along
Sung by all the people for his praises to the sky
For everything Sarnac was, a friend to you and I.

The King had need of folding steel singing on the wind
The King had need of mighty arm to lift him up again
The King had need of chivalry and a golden ring
The King had need of Sarnac....he was all those many things.

Copyright © 2006 George L. Reed II

Related article (the original notice)