What women's brooches tell us about Anglo-Saxon England

On the blog, A Corner of Tenth-Century Europe, Jonathan Jarrett offers a review of a paper by Jane Kershaw entitled New Insights on the Viking Settlement of England: the Small Finds Evidence, presented to the Institute of Historical Research Earlier Middle Ages seminar on 9 February, 2011.

The paper examines evidence of Viking brooches discovered in Anglo-Saxon England.

From Jarrett's write-up:

The brooches that she was talking about were found in England, between the second half of the ninth century and the second half of the tenth, but were in a Scandinavian style. They are therefore Viking cultural indicators, showing not just Viking jewellery æsthetics but Viking dress styles, as the oval brooches especially only make sense worn on a dress with straps which was not the Anglo-Saxon fashion before the Vikings came. Once they’d come, however, we can’t really tell whether what we have is Danish women who’d been brought over getting stuff made in the style they’d grown up with, or English women dressing like Danes. We can be fairly sure that the brooches were not being traded, though, or at least, not made for export in Scandinavia, because the range of styles found is basically the same as that in Scandinavia, so our notional brooch-seller would have to be working very hard to scoop up a representative sample from all round Denmark… The finds don’t cluster round ports of entry, either, and their distribution is mostly rural, so what we obviously don’t have is someone with a stall in York—in fact, York has thrown up almost none of these pieces, despite being quite heavily dug—getting brooches shipped in by the crate from his contact back in Aarhus, it’s more genuinely popular and incidental than that.