Black plague: Survival of the fittest

A new study by University of South Carolina anthropologist Sharon DeWitte shows that those who survived Europe's 14th century Black Plague "lived significantly longer and were healthier than people who lived before the epidemic struck in 1347."

Known World Players Auditions for Shakespeare’s “The Merchant of Venice”

Master Lorcan Dracontius has announced the audition schedule for The Known World Players’ production at Pennsic 44 of “The Merchant of Venice.”

Kolgrimr Olafsson offered Knighthood at Outlands Coronation Court

Countess Matilda Seton, Northern Herald, reports that at Their Coronation Court, Their Majesties Walrick and Cecilia of the Kingdom of the Outlands, offered admittance to the Order of Chivalry to Kolgrimr Olafsson.

Vikings return to Australia

A horde of medieval Vikings descended on Lismore, New South Wales recently  when members of the Rognvald's Lith joined with the Lismore Medieval Re-enactment Society to celebrate the Winter Solstice. Leah White of the Northern Star has the story.(photo)

Palio di Stonemarche photos online

Brita reports that she has created an album of photos from Palio di Stonemarche 2014, which took place recently in the Kingdom of the East. The photos are available to view on Shutterfly.

15th century Torah sold at auction for US$3.87 million

“The volume represents the very first appearance in print of all five books of the Pentateuch as well as the first to which vocalization and cantillation marks have been added,” said the Christie's auction house catalogue about the sale of a Torah, printed in Hebrew in Bologna in January 1482. An anonymous buyer paid US$3.87 million for the book. (photo)

St. Sabas seal found in Jerusalem

St. Sabas, a leader of the monastic movement, was a very important person in Jerusalem during the Middle Ages. Recently a lead seal, bearing his image and dating to the 13th century, was discovered during an archaeological dig in the Bayit Vegan neighborhood of Jerusalem. (photo)

"Only individual ever recorded related to the Norman invasion" found in East Sussex

Skeleton 180 might be a very remarkable individual: the only person recorded related to the Norman invasion of England. Buried in a medieval cemetery, 180 was believed to have died at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, but scientists have now placed his death around 1066.

Thamesreach celebrates Tudor Day

Members of the SCA Shire of Thamesreach recently took part in a celebration of Tudor Day at the Queens Elisabeth Hunting lodge in Epping Forest, England. Photographer PQNeiman was on hand to capture images of the day.

Renaissance revels in Siouxland

For two weeks each June, residents of Sioux Falls, South Dakota are invited to step back in time with the entertainers of the Siouxland Renaissance Festival. Dorene Weinstein of the Argus Leader caught up with Anna Vorhes, executive chairwoman of the Siouxland Renaissance Association, to talk about the festival.

Shakespeare and the Scientific Revolution

Readers of Shakespeare's works could easily dismiss his interest in science at a time when the Scientific Revolution was happening around him, but author Dan Falk believes that the Bard was well aware of the developments.

Hawks and hounds at Traquair medieval fayre

Traquair House, supposedly the oldest inhabited house in Scotland, was the site of the recent Traquair Medieval Fayre, complete with hawks, hounds and players. The BBC offers a short slideshow of the event.

Medieval theory of multiple universes?

According to Tom Mcleish, Giles Gasper and Hannah Smithson for an article in The Conversation, 13th century Bishop of Lincoln, Robert Grosseteste, was one of the most dazzling minds of his generation (1170 to 1253) and may have caught onto the modern notion of multiple universes.

SCAdians become "living resources" in An Tir

Jerry Boone of The Oregonian recently learned about re-creating medieval history and becoming a "living resource" from Vikki Cauldwell, Baroness of Dragon’s Mist in the SCA Kingdom of An Tir, as she prepared for Faire in the Grove. (photos)

Remains of King Erik the Holy to be studied

A team of scientists from Uppsala University in Sweden will be studying the remains of King Erik the Holy, a medieval Swedish king later canonized as Saint Erik. Researchers hope to discover more about the 12th century monarch including how he lived and his origins. (photo)

Storks return to Thrigby Hall

In the Middle Ages, it was common to see white storks, which breed in continental Europe and migrate to Africa in the winter, nesting in the chimneys of England, but no stork has done so for 600 years - until now. (photo, video)

"We’ll beat the ever living crud out of each other"

Attendees to the recent Tartan Day South Highland Games & Celtic Festival in Lexington County, South Carolina, were treated to an exhibition of armored combat by Steve Gillam and Lee Loftis. Cassie Cope of The State has the story. (photo, video)

"Examining 14th century Fashion" research paper online

A recent edition of the Falcon Banner, the news magazine of the Kingdom of Calontir, featured documentation by Duchess Aislinn Morcroft entitled An Age of Change: Examining 14th century Fashion.

Hunting with the eagles of Mongolia

In a wonderful article by William Kremer, of BBC World Service, photographer Asher Svidensky looks at some of the young people of Mongolia as they hunt using golden eagles, including 13-year-old Ashol-Pan, considered to be the country's only apprentice huntress. (photos)

"Incredibly significant" bishop's seal declared treasure

Metal detector enthusiast Andy Falconer has found a few artifacts over the years but nothing like the 14th century, silver bishop's seal, called "incredibly significant" by Manx National Heritage, he found recently in a field on the Isle of Man. (photo)

Illinois SCAdian honored for excellence in teaching

Kurt Willer, Danville (Illinois) High School librarian and member of the Society for Creative Anachronism, was recently awarded the David L. Fields Excellence in Teaching Award as an "outstanding" teacher in the district. Noelle McGee of the News-Gazette has the story.

Eternal tapestry: 4 years in the making

For 3 years and 10 months, Drachenwald Court Artisan Rakonczay Gergely has been weaving an amazingly-beautiful  tapestry, measuring 250x150cm. Now the finished work hangs on the wall and pictures of the work in progress tell the story.

Double Wars XXVII photos online

Lia de Thornegge reports that she has created an album of photos from Double Wars XXVII which took place recently in the Kingdom of Drachenwald. The photos are available to view on Flickr.

Seeking board members for SCA Ltd

SCA Ltd is again seeking nominations for board members. SCA Ltd is the administrative body that directs and oversees the "out-of-game" activities of the SCA in Australia.

Travel the Silk Road at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History

The Cleveland Museum of Natural History will host Traveling the Silk Road, an exhibit which promises "the spectacular sights, sounds and stories of the greatest trade route of ancient times." The spectacular exhibit will be at the museum until October 5, 2014.

Stefan's Florilegium updates for June 2014

THLord Stefan li Rous shares updates to Stefan's Florilegium for June 2014.

Nesscia inghean Chearnaigh chosen as Silent Heraldry Deputy

The Calontir Falcon Banner reports that the Laurel, Wreath, and Pelican Sovereigns of Arms have chosen a Silent Herald Deputy, a Society-level position created "to encourage and promote the use and equality of Silent Heraldry at all courts and events in which the entire populace attends."

Everyone "treated like royalty" at Mayfaire

The Middle Ages came to Tenino City Park recently as members of the Barony of Glymm Mere in the Kingdom of Antir celebrated Mayfaire, a "Baronial demonstration event" open to the public. Kevin Anderson, reporter for the Nisqually Valley News, attended and spoke to Baronial Chatelaine Aeryth Le Marchand. (photo)

Richard's crown placed on display

An ornate, gold, jewel-bedecked crown that will grace the coffin for the reburial of England's King Richard III, was displayed recently at Tewkesbury Abbey. (photo)

Mead joins artisanal drinks culture

Once considered a beverage for sweaty Vikings or geeky Renaissance Faire attendees, mead has "shed its medieval reputation and is claiming a coveted spot in Northern California's artisanal drinks culture." Jessica Yadegaran of the San Jose Mercury News has a feature story.