Archive - Story

November 14th, 2013

Re-enactor strives to survive on a 9th century farm

Pavel Sapozhnikov of Khotkovo is undertaking an experiement in history this winter by seeking to survive a tough, Russian winter "in a 9th-century environment, with no access to electricity, the Internet or other modern amenities." Dmitry Vinogradov of RIA Novosti has the story.

November 13th

The light of medieval times

In a 2013 paper, published in volume 4 of i-Perception on perceptionweb.com, Claus-Christian Carbon and Pia Deininger look at the role and perception of light in the medieval world. The paper is entitled Golden perception: Simulating perceptual habits of the past.

"Rare, multifunctional oven" found in England

"It's almost certainly a rare, multifunctional oven, with a shelf like a pizza oven for bread, and you could have finished off the malting process for barley and dried grain," said Dr John Jolleys about the discovery of a 1,300-year-old Anglo-Saxon oven in Sedgeford, England. (photo)

November 12th

Professional combatants duke it out in Poland

Those familiar with armored combat in the SCA might want to take a look at a video posted on YouTube of professional tournament fighters Witold Kwiatosiński, of Poland, and Heinrich Stefan Wurzian, of Austria, at atournament in Ciechanów, Poland on 8 June 2013. Combatants use live steel and grappling techniques.

3D laser mapping may help preserve Leaning Tower of Pisa

The campanile of the cathedral of the city of Pisa, Italy has been leaning since its construction in the 12th century. Now, a new handheld 3D mapping system developed by CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, may "preserve" the Leaning Tower in bits if the ultimate catastrophe happens. (photos, video)

November 11th

Armor on the runway

The newest trend in fashion is not crop tops or romantic florals but medieval armor. Annalee Newitz of io9 reports on the work of designer Pinkabsinthe whose handcrafted fashion armor may not protect, but certainly looks cool. (photos)

Scotland's Tapestry Project

Needleworkers in Scotland have created a very cool tapestry project, the world's largest, according to the BBC.

November 9th

Scottish battle anniversaries focus of tourism industry

September 9, 2013 marked the 500th anniversary of the Battle of Flodden (the English won), while 2014 will be the 700th anniversary of the Battle of Bannockburn (the Scots took that one), two events destined to bring tourists flocking to Scotland and northern England. Sophie Campbell of The Telegraph has a feature story.

The jewels of the saints

After the Reformation, many Catholics were depressed about the loss of relics of their saints. In the 16th century thousands of skeletons were taken from the catacombs in Rome, bedecked with jewels, and distributed throughout Europe. A slideshow of jeweled saints, photographed by art historian Paul Koudounaris, is online.

November 8th

Yorkshire chapel may be Richard III's

A team of archaeologists from the University of York believe they have discovered the remains of a 15th century chapel ordered to be built by Richard III to commemorate the Battle of Towton (1461).

Search for sultan's heart continues

Archaeologists working at a site near Szigetvar, Hungary have discovered an Ottoman-era town near the site of the 16th century siege between Suleiman the Magnificent and Croatian-Hungarian nobleman Miklos Zrinyi. Experts hope to find the location where the sultan's heart is buried.

Early medieval grave finds "quite a surprise"

Until recently, archaeologists believed that the site of a dig in northern Poland was "considered quite poor," but then more than 40 graves, containing a wealth of early medieval artifacts, were discovered in Burdąg, Warmia and Mazury. The experts were "surprised." (photos)

November 7th

Richard III to be given kingly burial in Leicester

Plans have been announced for the interment of King Richard III, whose remains were discovered in 2012, in Leicester Cathedral. The announcement follows news that a legal challenge by distant relatives of the King requesting his burial in York, had been denied. The re-burial, complete with pomp and circumstance will take pace in 2014.

Baron to Knight to Prince in a Day

Brennan mac Fearghus started last Saturday as a Baron.  Before he’d fought his first bout in Crown Tourney, he was a knight. By evening he was a prince.

November 6th

13th century volcano changed climate

Medieval texts record an abrupt cooling in the weather in the middle of the 13th century, including a terrible summer in 1258. Now a group of scientists believe they have found the source of the cooling: the eruption of the Samalas Volcano on Lombok Island, Indonesia.

Weights important tool in Viking trade

Much of the trade during the Viking Age was international in nature, leading merchants to depend on the balance weight scale and its weights as an important tool. In Ireland, these weights were often made of small, decorative items, apparently broken off of larger objects, usually from churches or monasteries.

November 5th

Hobby Lobby president purchases world's oldest Jewish prayer book

“This is the oldest Jewish prayer book known to exist in the world,” said Steven Green, the president of the retail chain Hobby Lobby, on the purchase of a 9th century parchment manuscript. Green, a collector of religious artifacts, plans to donate the book, along with his collection to the new Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C.

Roman Child's Lead Coffin Unearthed

Dating to about the third century CE, a small lead coffin was recently unearthed in Leicestershire, England. It is presumed to be a Christian burial due to its east-west orientation and is less than a meter long. (photo, video)

November 4th

Quivers and Quarrels: Fall issue

The Nostalgia Fall Edition of Quivers & Quarrels -- wherein we explore the origins and evolution of combat and target archery in the SCA, from the first garden stake arrows and Freon can helms to the exciting game we play today -- is now available online in the SCA's e-newsletter site.

Were headless skeletons slaves of Vikings?

In the 1980s, a number of graves were discovered on an island in the Norwegian Sea, some without their heads. New research may show that the headless burials were slaves to their dead Viking masters.

SCAdians gather in Dunn Meadow

The sound of rattan against steel competed with harp music as members of Mynydd Seren, the Indiana University Chapter of the Society for Creative Anachronism, displayed their skills in Dunn Meadow. Alec Priester of the Indiana Daily Student has the story. (photo)

November 3rd

Stonehenge's "Avenue" discovered

Archaeologists have long known of the existence of the "Avenue," an ancient pathway leading to Stonehenge, but a modern road had obscured it. Now workers dismantling the A344 have found two ditches believed to be remnants of the original approach.

Roman chainmail found in Harzhorn

German archaeologists are excited by the discovery of well-preserved Roman chainmail during excavations near Kalefeld in the Northeim district north of Göttingen, the first such armor recovered from a Roman-Germanic battlefield. (photo)

November 2nd

History from Below

In an article posted on ManyHeadedMonster website, Chris Briggs, Lecturer in Medieval British Social and Economic History at the University of Cambridge, discusses the possessions of the peasantry of England and Europe during the later middle ages (1200-1500). The Future of History from Below is the 16th piece in an online symposium.

Ariella of Thornbury offered Knighthood in AEthelmearc

Master Broom reports that Baroness Ariella of Thornbury has been offered elevation to the Order of the Chivalry. The writ was delivered by Their Majesties Timothy and Gabrielle of the Kingdom of AEthelmearc at Their Crown Tournament.

November 1st

Tracking the sea beasties

Modern maps rarely include wondrous sea monsters in their depictions of bodies of water. Author Chet Van Duzer laments this fact in his new book Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps. Tanya Lewis of LiveScience has a review.

Tudor tombs re-created by historians and scientists

Archival experts are teaming up with scientists to re-create two Tudor monuments using a combination of cutting-edge technology and document research. The two tombs, both victims of Henry VIII's dissolution of the monasteries, are those of Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk and Henry Fitzroy, Duke of Richmond, illegimate son of Henry VIII. (photo)

Heather Dale takes Texas

Canadian folk singer and songwriter Heather Dale lives a long way from Texas, but she traveled south recently to perform at Copperas Cove Public Library. Cove Herald reporter Erik Papke spoke with Heather's fans who gathered for the performance.

October 31st

Lincoln Castle excavations yield interesting finds

Construction of a new museum to house a copy of the Magna Carta at Lincoln Castle in England has halted after the discovery of the remains of a church, human skeletons and other artifacts. Among the finds was a sarcophagus, believed to contains the bones of "somebody terribly important." (photos)

Two offered peerages at An Tir July 2013 Coronation

THL Finn Grim, Court Reporter, reports that, at Their July 2013 Coronation, Their Majesties Ieuan and Gwyneth of the Kingdom of An Tir offered elevation to the Peerage to two of Their subjects.