Archive - Story

May 3rd, 2014

Winter storms reveal leg bones of monk

Alas, poor monk, whose eternal rest was disturbed by the discovery of his leg bones protruding from a cliff along the sea shore of Monknash, South Wales. The remains are believed to be from a young Cistercian monk who lived at the nearby 12 century abbey. (photo)

May 2nd

Saving Winchester Roman wall "not possible"

Local historians in Winchester, England are outraged at the proposal that a Roman wall, unearthed in 2013 during construction of 14 new houses, may be destroyed and used as filler for foundations.

Mudthaw 2014 photos online

Brita reports that she has created an album of photos from Mudthaw 2014, which took place in March in the Kingdom of the East. The photos are available to view on Shutterfly.

May 1st

Tournaments Illuminated Quest Request April 2014

Magister Riordan MacGregor, editor of Tournaments Illuminated, has announced the latest Quest Request.

Announcement re Bullying & Harassment Policy

Tiffany Brown and Melissa Muckart of SCA Ltd Australia and SCANZ Inc New Zealand report that a joint bullying and harassment policy for participating SCA, Inc members is now available online.

SCA Ltd Social Media Policy (Draft)

Sorle Maknicoll, SCA Ltd Webwright, reports that a draft of the Social Media Policy for SCA Ltd. (Australia only) is now available online. Comments are encouraged.

April 30th

Lief and Morrigan new Prince and Princess of Drachenwald

Aryanhwy reports that Jarl Lief Wolfsonne was the winner of the April 5, 2014 Crown Tournament in the Kingdom of Drachenwald. His Highness was inspired in His endeavor by Countess Morrigan of Temair.

Stefan's Florilegium updates for April 2014

THLord Stefan li Rous reports that he has posted updates to Stefan's Florilegium for April 2014.

April 28th

Great Western War Pre-reg is Open

It's here it's here it's here! Like the first breath of spring, open registration for Great Western War has returned, bringing new life to your dreams of glory on the field, inspiration among the arts, and legendary shenanigans behind the scenes.

Stinky surprise for Danish archaeologists

 Archaeologists working on a site in Odense on Funen, Denmark were treated to an odiferous surprise recently with the discovry of 14th century barrels used to contain the contents of latrines.

April 27th

"Stunning" Roman bracelet on display in Furness

Trade between the Roman and the British locals may be enbodied by a single silver bracelet, dating to the second century, discovered recently by a metal detectorist near Dalton-in-Furness, England. Probably traded by a Roman soldier visiting the town, the "stunning" bracelet is now on display at Barrow's Dock Museum in Furness. (photo)

Sir Kenneth Branagh wins awards with "Scottish play"

Kenneth Branagh, who has stirred audiences with his portrayals of such diverse characters as Henry V and Gilderoy Lockhart, has won over ciritcs in a new version of Shakespeare's Macbeth, which garnered three prizes at the Manchester Theatre Awards.

April 26th

Vikings invade British Museum

Not since the 11th century have Vikings made such a big splash in England as with the opening of the new BP-sponsored exhibition at the British Museum in London, Vikings: life and legend. The exhibit opened march 6, 2014 and will close June 22. (photos)

Retired professor saves 8th century Indian mint

Manmohan Kumar, a retired professor from Maharishi Dayanand University, Rohtak, India, was concerned about urbanization engulfing historic archaeological sites near Haryana. His pleas motivated a team from the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) to explore the area, where it unearthed the remains of an 8th century mint. (photos)

April 25th

Viking mass grave findings generate book and museum exhibition

In 2009, a Dorset County, England road project uncovered the remains of 50 decapitated skeletons, later identified as Viking. Now the mass grave is the subject of a book, Given to the Ground: A Viking Age Mass Grave on Ridgeway Hill by members of the team that subsequently studied the remains. (photos)

Old Nieszawa virtually rebuilt

The original Polish town of Nieszawa, on the Vistula River, only existed for 35 years before it was demolished and rebuilt 32 km upstream, but now it lives again - virtually - thanks to a two-year non-invasive investigation including geophysics and aerial prospection.

The "peaceful conquest" of Roman Britain

Everyone knows that the transition from Roman Britain to Anglo-Saxon England was a brutal time -- everyone but Dr Andrew Millard, from Durham University, whose new study in the Journal of Archaeological Science, shows a more peaceful process. (maps)

April 23rd

Candelabra might be key to medieval Spanish navigation

In 1970, a diver off the coast of Spain found a rare 10th century bronze candelabra. Since then, experts have studied the artifact as verification of a trade routes between Spanish cities and southern France, a topic about which little is known.

Second oldest church "a big surprise"

Archaeologists in Mainz, Germany have discovered the second oldest church and the only surviving Carolingian cathedral in Germany. Within the walls of the city's Church of St John lie the remains of a 9th century structure whose walls "stretch from the basement to the roof."

Ludus on the Danube

For over 100 years, archaeologists have been stydying Roman Carnuntum, on the Danube River near Vienna, but only recently were they aware of the existence of a ludus, or gladiator school, covering 30,138 square feet (2,800 square meters). The new research has been used to construct a 3D model of the site. (photos)

April 22nd

Ancient barley virus carried by Crusaders

A team of British scientists from the University of Warwick has been able to sequence the genome of ancient RNA thanks to the study of ancient barley from Egypt. The fossilized grain contained the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus, believed to be a modern disease, which may have been transported to Egypt by Crusaders in the Seventh Crusade.

Murder declared in Scotland

An unidentified 20-year-old man has been found murdered in Kirk Ness in East Lothian, Scotland, but the murderer will not likely be found. The victim, fatally stabbed four times in the back, was killed in the 12th or 13th century.

April 21st

Vikings gather for Ragnarok

How did you spend Ragnarok? If you are British, you might have celebrated at the JORVIK Viking Festival where warriors fought the Norse gods in an epic battle. Festival director Danielle Daglan spoke with NPR's All Thing's Considered about the event. (podcast)

Dark ages less barbaric than Roman, says historian

Dominic Selwood is a lawyer, writer and historian. He is also a blogger on a mission: to take the "dark" out of the Dark Ages. Selwood recently blogged on the subject for The Telegraph with Why the so-called 'Dark Ages' were just as civilised as the savage Roman Empire.

April 20th

Early Saxon graves unearthed in Cambridgeshire

Archaeologists in the English village of Haddenham have uncovered nine burials dating to the Early Saxon period (6th century CE) in the car park of the Three Kings Pub. The graves, of both men and women, contained a wealth of grave goods including a spear and shield and a beaded necklace. (photos)

From the Laurel King of Arms: Silent Herald Deputy Applications Sought

The Laurel Sovereign of Arms invites interested candidates to apply for the job of Silent Herald Deputy, overseeing the Heralds who translate auditory information for non-hearing attendees at Court.

April 19th

Christians in Denmark by 9th century

New studies of the Domskirke in Ribe, Denmark show that Christians may have lived in the area 100 years before Denmark officially became a Christian country. Excavations at the site have unearthed over 70 Christian burials dating to the mid-to-late 9th century.

Illegal metal detectorist tears Roman gold from ground in Germany

Investigators in Germany are untangling the case of a metal detectorist who illegally dug up more than EU€1 million worth of Roman gold in a forest in southern Rheinland-Pfalz. The perpetrator may already have sold some of the pieces on the Black Market. (photos)

April 18th

Ken Theriot Celebrates “Outlaws and Bystanders”

Sir Kenneth MacQuarrie of Tobermory introduces his new album of historical and SCA-focused music, written by himself and his wife, Mistress Adelaide de Beaumont.

April 17th

Removing hair - not flesh - in the Renaissance

Ladies, no more spending your hard-erned money for salon waxing. Simply follow the renaissance recipe for hair removal: arsenic, cat dung and vinegar. Read the article by Rose Eveleth in Smithsonian.