Archive - Apr 2013 - Story

April 30th

SCA: “They just don’t get to read about history. They get to do it.”

“I love seeing how people can really get into their character and become someone from the Middle Ages,they just don’t get to read about history. They get to do it.” said Isabella Beatrice della Rosa (Melissa Wobig) to reporter Chris Mueller of The Daily Republic (Mitchell, South Dakota) about SCA members. Mueller covered the recent Coronation in the Kingdom of Northshield. (photo)

Medieval burial shows love that outlasts death

Two skeletons in a grave in Romania have been found buried together holding hands. The skeletons were probably buried between 1450 and 1550.

MetPublications offers free armor books

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York is featuring twelve books celebrating arms and armoring on its MetPublications website. Some of the books are available to download, and others are readable online.

April 29th

SCA members create "Medieval Day" at Bruce County Museum

On April 21, 2013, the Middle Ages came to the Bruce County Museum and Cultural Centre with the help of local members of the Society for Creative Anachronism. The demonstration was covered by the Saugeen Times (Saugeen, Ontario). (photos)

Work begins on Cardigan Castle restoration project

For years, officials at Wales' 12th century Cardigan Castle have dreamed of raising funding to restore the castle and turn it into a heritage center and site for open-air concerts. The castle is believed to be the birthplace of the eisteddfod,  a festival of poetry and music, dating to the 12th century.

North Yorkshire claims Richard III

"Why should we trust them? They misplaced him for 500 years," says Conservative Councillor Tom Fox of the Scarborough Borough Council about his objection to Richard III's burial in Leicester, England. (video)

April 28th

Hunt to find Boudicca

The latest subject of interest for royal remains hunters is Boudicca, the warrior queen, who fought the Romans to defend Britain, who may lie beneath a Birmingham McDonalds or platform eight, nine or 10 at King's Cross Station.

Scots mercenary tradition

Since the Middle Ages, Scottish men have been involved in military pursuits, often on foreign soil. Fierce fighters, especially from the western islands, were particularly prized by the armies of Denmark, the Netherlands, Spain and France. Steven McKenzie of the BBC looks at their history.

Experts debate age of York sapphire ring

A group of experts convened recently at the Yorkshire Museum to debate the age of the beautiful Escrick Ring, found in a field near York, England. The ring was believed to date from the 12th through 16th centuries, but some now think as early as the 5th century. (photo)

April 27th

Greetings from the incoming SCA Inc. President

Leslie Vaughn, the incoming President of the SCA Inc., has published an open letter of greeting to the populace, including a farewell letter from outgoing President, Thomas Hughes.

Does Sudeley Castle conceal Roman ruins?

The recent discovery of a Roman column and the discovery last year of a stone relief of Roman god Cunomaglos have archaeologists calling for an investigation of Sudeley Castle in Winchcombe, England. Experts believe the castle may conceal a temple and a villa.

Richard on the couch

Now that Richard III's body has been identified, experts are probing his mind. In a paper presented March 2, 2013 at the University of Leicester, Professor Mark Lansdale and forensic psychologist Dr Julian Boon offered an analysis of Richard III's character.

Generous donors complete funding for the Mary Rose Museum

The final UK£35,000 needed to complete the Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth, England's Historic Dockyard has been raised thanks to a plea by the Mary Rose Trust. Museum officials are "putting the finishing touches" on the museum's interior, including filling cases with artifacts receoved from Henry VIII's flagship. (photo)

April 26th

The Roman hairstyle debate continues

According to the article On Pins and Needles: Stylist Turns Ancient Hairdo Debate on Its Head, Janet Stephens is a hairdo archaeologist. She has recreated Roman hairstyles, and in the article, she discusses her research - and her critics.

"Knights" bring history to California middle schoolers

It was a day when history came to life recently at Lompoc Valley Middle School when students were treated to a display of armored combat and other lessons from the Middle Ages courtesy of members of the local chapter of the Society for Creative Anachronism. (photo)

Kent church: "Reputed to be the tomb of Richard Plantagenet"

A derelict church in Eastwell, Kent, England, may hold the final resting place of Richard Plantagenet, illegitimate son of King Richard III. A grave in St Mary's churchyard is marked with the inscription: "Reputed to be the tomb of Richard Plantagenet". Now scientists want to know the truth.

April 25th

A tour of the Border Abbeys

Planning a trip to Scotland? You may want to visit the four Border Abbeys, Melrose, Jedburgh, Dryburgh and Kelso, founded by King David I of Scotland in the 12th Century. A recent BBC article looks at the history of the religious sites in a troubled area. (photos)

Estrella War 2013 Lost and Found List Posted

Lady Bethia Somers of the Atenveldt Sheriff's Office reports that a lost and found list for Estrella War 2013 is now available online.

Animal Day at Pennsic 42

Katla Ulfhedinn, Medieval Animal Day Coordinator, Pennsic 42, reports that the Pennsic Artisans Row will feature an Animal Day.

April 24th

Shakespeare as educator

The works of Shakespeare have often been used to educate scholars throughout the world, but to historians in Titchfield near Southampton, England, the education may have taken place closer to home. Scholars there believes that William Shakespeare may have spent the years 1589-1592 working as a schoolmaster in the town.

European debt crisis - past and present

The debt woes of Cyprus and Greece, along with other European countries, have garnered headlines in recent days, but the stories are not new. Renaissance Florence had its own debt crisis, with a solution that looks surprisingly modern.

April 23rd

Unidentified Winchester bones could be exhumed for testing

The recent discovery of the remains of Richard III have led experts to wonder if an unmarked grave in Winchester, England might hold the bones of King Alfred the Great.

Gulf Wars XXII: "My kid brother thinks I'm crazy"

When interviewed by Donesha Aldridge of WHLT 22 television, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, Gulf Wars Media Specialist Sheila Doughty and rapier fighter Theorn Rutyna spoke about the fun and comradery of the SCA. (video)

Who's the rightful British monarch?

Is Queen Elizabeth II the rightful ruler of Great Britain? Tony Robinsons doesn't think so. He explains in a 48-min. documentary produced for Channel 4.

Jethro Stille placed on vigil for Pelican in the Outlands

Master Mordrake reports that Their Majesties Garick and Yasamin of the Kingdom of the Outlands have chosen to place THL Jethro Stille on vigil to contemplate elevation to the Order of the Pelican. The offer was made at the Tri-Baronial A&S Competition.

April 22nd

SCA offers tutorials on Social Media

Lady Avelyn Wexcombe, Interim Social Media Coordinator for the Kingdom of Ealdormere, reports that the Society Social Media Officer, Lord Tobias Morgan, has posted some new tools and links from of the SCA's home page.

Knights invade Arab Elementary School

It was a fun day for students at Arab Elementary School in Arab, Alabama when nine members of the local chapter of the Society for Creative Anachronism brought the Middle Ages to life in the classroom. Arab Tribune photographer David Moore was on hand for the fun with his camera. (photos)

April 21st

Ransom profitable for medieval rank-and-file

History has recorded that the ransom of kings and nobles was a popular way for armies to raise money during the Middle Ages, but new research shows that the practice may have also been popular among common soldiers.

"State-of-the-art" medieval medicine showcased in mummified head

For centuries, medical historians have believed that advancements in medicine were stalled between the days of Galen and the Renaissance. Now radiocarbon dating of a mummified, dissected head to the 13th century, shows that medieval doctors may have been more sophisticated than previsouly believed. (photo)

The case for the "blood eagle"

While the image of the Vikings has been rehabilitated in the past few years, showing them as peaceful farmers and artisans, some evidence of cruel and bloodthirsty behavior does exist. In Smithsonian's blog Past Imperfect, Mike Dash looks at the more brutal side of the Norsemen, and the fact of torture such as the "blood eagle."