Archive - Mar 11, 2012 - Story

Portable Antiquities Scheme offers registry of British "treasures"

Metal detector hobbyists and amateur archaeologists in Great Britain are encouraged to record their discoveries of objects over 300 years old on the Portable Antiquities Scheme website, which also provides news and articles on British archaeological finds.

Irish Times reporter offers "A History of Ireland in 100 Objects "

Irish Times reporter Fintan O’Toole provides a history of his country one artifact at a time. In his A history of Ireland in 100 objects, O’Toole reports on one object, from the National Museum of Ireland, each Saturday and its significance in the history and culture of the country.

Lynn Museum acquires Roman fertility pendant

A grant has allowed the Lynn Museum near Norfolk, England to purchase a solid gold Roman pendant crafted in the shape of a phallus. The rare find, in excellent condition, was discovered last year by a metal detectorist. (photo - PG-13)

Peterborough home of Roman "rich and famous"

A farm in Itter Crescent, outside Peterborough, England, has held a secret for nearly 2,000 years, a secret revealed by the recent discovery of "a substantial, two-floor courtyard limestone Roman villa with rooms floored with mosaic on the sides of a cobbled courtyard," on the site.

Shakespeare's grammar key to his prominence

Dr. Jonathan Hope believes that the key to William Shakespeare's success was not the words that he used, but the way in which he used them. In a chapter in his new book on the English language, Hope finds that the Bard's grammar and word ordering are what set him apart from other writers.