Archive - Jan 2012 - Story

January 9th

Major Shift in Alliances for Pennsic

Pennsic XLI is going to be different from any Pennsic before it. For the first time, the traditional opponents, the East Kingdom and the Middle Kingdom, will be fighting as allies, against AEthelmearc, in whose lands Pennsic lies, and Atlantia.

January 8th

York Cause Papers: ecclesiastical history online

With the help of grant money, the York Cause Papers, records from the Church Courts of York from the 1300 to 1858, are now available online.

McParland’s, Parnell Street, Ireland's oldest timber-frame building

An unassuming building with an interesting chimney in Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, may be “potentially one of the most exciting urban archaeological discoveries in Ireland in recent years.” The building, currently under restoration, is believed to be Ireland’s earliest surviving example of a timber framed house. (photo)

January 7th

Roman ring awarded to Welsh museum

The British Museum has given a Roman ring, found on Cefn Brithdir in Wales, to the Winding House Museum at New Tredegar for permanent display. The ring was discovered by a metal detectorist. (photo)

1,000 years of British history on church walls

The history and art of Great Britain can be traced by the paintings on its church walls. Now interested parties may not have to travel to review the country's glorious wallpaintings, but can study them online thanks to the efforts of the Churches Conservation Trust.

January 6th

Medieval knights and PTSD

Most people associate PTSD with modern warfare, but a new study shows that not only were the Middle Ages not as violet as previously believed, but that knights engaged in violent activities suffered from stress.

17th Century "fairytale cottage" may have link to dark history

Workers from United Utilities in the village of Barley, England, were "stunned" to discover a well-preserved 17th century cottage during a construction project. The cottage included the bones of a cat found inside a wall, possibly put there to ward off evil spirits.

January 5th

Chainmail shows team spirit

Love your sports team? Show it in chainmail! That's what San Jose Sharks fan "Metal Mind" did with the creation of a chainmail Sharks jersey constructed of 23,000 rings of anodized aluminum dyed in the colors of the hockey team. (photos)

The cultural setting for Byzantine-Lombard jewelery in the early Middle Ages

In a paper for British Museum, Neil Christie looks at "cultural and socio-politico-economic context" of Byzantine-Lombard jewelery in 6th through 8th century. (photos)

January 4th

Stilt-jousting marks 600th anniversary

In a recent interview, NPR's Robert Siegel investigates the magic of stilt-walking, including the 600-year-old tradition of stilt-jousting in the city of Namur, Belgium. The story is available in print and audio.

Chatham's Tudor shipyard confirmed

Archaeologists working on a dig in Chatham, England have confirmed that a dockyard dating to the time oif Henry VIII existed on the site of the Command House pub on the banks of River Medway. Officials hope to make a bid to declare the dockyard a World Heritage site.

January 3rd

Medieval church unearthed in Sozopol, Bulgaria

It has been a busy year for archaeologists in Sozopol on the Black Sea coast of Bulgaria, where recently the remains of a 13th century church and the eastern gate of the ancient city fortress were discovered.

Flame's Christmas Tourney portraits online

Chad White reports that the photos from the self-service photo booth at the Barony of the Flame's 40th Annual Christmas Tourney, which took place recently in the Middle Kingdom, are now available to view on Flickr.

January 2nd

Khazaria: the third superpower

In the 7th through 10th centuries, two super powers ruled Eastern Europe: Byzantium, "bulwark of Christendom in the east," and the Arab empire, but some historians name a third. Khazaria, a Jewish kingdom, played a crucial a part in the stemming of the Arab advance into Europe. (map)

Irish church bell could be world's oldest

A bronze bell from Derry, Ireland, in storage since the 1930s, may be the world's oldest existing church bell. The bell dates to 1411 and was probably made in France. Christian symbols on the bell lead researchers to believe it may have once belonged to a church or abbey.

January 1st

Plea to save German "leaning tower"

The famous leaning tower of the Church of Our Dear Ladies on the Hill in Bad Frankenhausen, Germany is scheduled for demolition if funds to stabilize the tower cannot be raised. The tower leans 4.5 meters (15 feet) from the perpendicular, more than the leaning tower of Pisa. (photo)

Teaching at Gulf Wars

Mistress Elizabet de Ross, Department Head for Artisan's Row for Gulf Wars 21, is seeking instructors for the upcoming War.