Archive - Jan 2012 - Story

Emma Dansmeyla placed on vigil in Ealdormere

Martin reports that Their Majesties Quilliam and Dagmar of the Kingdom of Ealdormere have placed Emma Dansmeyla on vigil to contemplate elevation to the Order of the Laurel. The announcement was made at Septentrian 12th night.

"Cumbrian Dragon" may have belonged to a knight

A stunning miniature of a 15th century knight slaying a dragon has been found in Carlisle, England. The cast silver gilt piece is of high quality and thought to be a piece of jewelery rather than a pilgrim's badge.

NH Make-A-Wish Foundation builds castle for young boy

The Make-A-wish Foundation (New Hampshire) built a castle - in his backyard - for young David Marasco, who "has a rare disease called desmoid fibromatosis."

January 30th

The Queen's Servants: a review

On the blog KimikoSews, the author offers a detailed review of the book The Queen's Servants by Caroline Johnson which focusses on clothing of the serving class in Tudor England.

Medieval Barn Is Saved

Built in 1426 to store grain, the medieval Harmondsworth Barn is as large as a cathedral nave, and still has the marks from the carpenters and masons who constructed it. English Heritage has added it to its national collection which includes Stonehenge and parts of Hadrian's Wall.

January 29th

Rappin' to Chaucer with Baba Brinkman

Canadian Baba Brinkman is a performer - and a scholar of medieval literature. He combined both in a recent one-man show, The Canterbury Tales Remixed, which set the Chaucer’s 14th-century work to original hip-hop songs. Catherine Rampell of the New York Times, has a review.

“Ornament of the World” depicted in video on Moorish Spain

A medieval German traveler once described Granada, in Moorish Spain, as the “Ornament of the World.” A video posted on the Moroccan Design website showcases the beauty and enlightment of the region.

The glorious Sistine Chapel

Long to travel to Italy to study its Renaissance Art, but can't afford the travel expenses? Take a trip to the Vatican and see the wonders of the Sistine Chapel - virtually.

January 28th

Silver coins reveal previously unknown Viking ruler

The coroner in Lancashire, England has declared a hoard of Viking silver "treasure." The hoard, discovered by a metal detector enthusiast, consists of 201 coins, including some identifying a previously unknown Viking ruler of northern England, as well as jewelry. (photo)

"Bruises and bloody noses are part of the deal" at Trier's gladiator school

Residents of Trier, Germany's oldest city, have become accustomed to the sounds of battle cries and metal on metal as more and more citizens join the city's gladiator school in its 2000-year-old Roman arena.

Early Christian art on display in New York

Visitors to New York City with an interest in Byzantine or Early Christian art may want to pay a visit to the Onassis Cultural Center in Midtown Manhattan to view Transition to Christianity: Art of Late Antiquity, 3rd – 7th Century AD, a display of 170 pieces of art from museums in Greece and Cyprus.

January 27th

Royal Shakespeare Company to create "portable" theater for London performances

Stratford's Royal Shakespeare Company is hoping to construct a "flatpack replica" of famous theater for use in large productions in London. The theater interior would be reconstructed inside an existing building.

Eumathios Philokales reveals two Byzantine churches in Cyprus

The Eumathios Philokales project, which focuses on Byzantine monuments, has announced that excavations at two churches have revealed earlier religious buildings dating to the 7th and 11th centuries.

January 26th

Wall collapse leads to archaeological opportunity at Stirling Castle

It was good news and bad news for officials at Stirling Castle in Scotland. A wall retaining late 15th century garden terraces collapsed, but the collapse now affords the opportunity to investigate remnants of gardens made for James IV.

Pope Benedict to Canonize Hildegard of Bingen

The Vatican has announced that Pope Benedict XVI will appoint Hildegard of Bingen as a Doctor of the Church in October of 2012. The 12th century German Benedictine nun is also expected to be canonized in 2012. (video)

Ozark Castle Closes?

It appears that the replica medieval fortress in Arkansas, being constructed using authentic techniques and materials, has run out of money and is closing.

January 25th

Wallace Collection arms and armor catalog available for pre-order

The Wallace Collection has announced that pre-orders are now being taken for a digital catalog of the arms and armor held by the Wallace Collection. The catalog is being published in USB drive format with an accompanying book.

Two Westerners elevated at Twelfth Night

Viscount Sir Roric Skogan and Viscountess Syele von der Rosen of House Verthandi in the West Kingdom report that Their Majesties Uther and Kara have chosen to elevate two of Their subjects at the recent Twelfth Night event.

MIT students learn cooking of the Middle Ages

Students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have an interesting choice of study during the Independent Activities Period between semesters. The can take a non-credit course in food and cooking of the Middle Ages.

January 24th

Wroxeter’s Roman Town House copes with tourist increase

When Channel Four TV challenged a team of builders to construct a Roman town house, it never expected the crowds of visitors to converge on the site, leading English Heritage to require emergency repairs. The Roman Town House was the subject of the Rome Wasn’t Built in a Day program. (video)

Photos from 2012 AEthelmearc 12th Night online

Alaxandair reports that he has created an album of photos from Kingdom 12th Night which took place recently in the Barony of the Debatable Lands, Kingdom of AEthelmearc. The photos are available to view on his public Facebook site.

Bayeux Tapestry: in toto

The website Bibliotheca Augustana offers a scrollable rendition of the complete Bayeux Tapestry from end to end - and in Latin!

January 23rd

"It's about interaction and fun, not delusion"

Gerry Dowswell is retired, but that doesn't keep him from wielding a sword in his local chapter of the Society for Creatiuve Anachronism. He knows where his character ends and real life begins. "It's about interaction and fun," Dowswell said, "not delusion." (video)

Evidence suggest that London was built by Iceni slaves

An essay from a recent issue of British Archaeology suggests that the city of London was  built as a military base by the captured Iceni tribesmen of rebel Queen Boudica, who were then executed. Author Dominic Perring bases his theory on the discovery of hundreds of skulls of young males.

Peerages at Selviergard Yule

Baron Khevron of the Principality of Oertha in the Kingdom of the West reports that videos of Peerage ceremonies by Lady Merewyn of Ynys Taltraeth, shot at December 2011's Selviergard Yule, are now available to view on YouTube.

January 22nd

Activists argue for exoneration of Germany's witches

Between 1500 and 1782 CE, 25,000 people, including children, were tortured and executed for witchcraft in what is today Germany. Now activists, such as retired Protestant minister Hartmut Hegeler, are seeking to exonerate as many as possible of the German "witches."

Byzantine oil jar suggests trade Mediterranean

The Israel Antiquities Authority reports that remnants of a Byzantine oil jar, dating to the 6th century, has been found on Netanya's Poleg beach. The presence of the large jar suggests trade in olive oil along the Israeli coast. (photo)

Roman cockerel found in child's grave in Cirencester

Archaeologist Neil Holbrook, chief executive at Cotswold Archaeology, called the discovery of an 1,800-year-old enamelled cockerel figurine in the grave of a child a "most spectacular" find. The figurine is believed to have religious significance. (photo)

January 21st

The secrets of the Mary Rose

In 1545, Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose sank while fighting the French in the Solent, the straits north of the Isle of Wight in England. The remains of the ship were rediscovered in 1971, catching the imagination of historians worldwide. A documentary, Ghosts of the Mary Rose, is available online.

Discovering "a way of life from an age gone by"

Longing to live the life of a British farmer during the reign of King James I? Now, while you may not be able to live it, you can certainly watch how a group of people take on the task of working a Jacobean farm. The 12-part series, Tales from the Green Valley, is available on YouTube.