Archive - 2011 - Story

November 30th

Calontir's Queen's Prize photos online

Vilhelm reports that he has created four albums of photos from Queen's Prize, which took place place recently in the Kingdom of Calontir. The photos are available on Flickr.

November 29th

Five-year York Hungate dig comes to an end in December, 2011

Archaeologists are beginning to pack up their tools five years after the excavation of York, England's Hungate dig began. In 2012, the York Archaeological Trust will turn the 2,500 sq m (26,900 sq ft) excavation over to developers for a modern housing project.

14th century hand cannon demonstrated

In a 9-minute video, members of the Springfield Arsenal, LLC go "medieval" by demonstrating a 14th century 3-Barrel Rapid-Fire Pole Cannon, a black powder device fired by striking against a surface.

Dining in Narnia

What if Anthony Bourdain, the caustic host of the Travel Channel's No Reservations, visited C.S. Lewis' Narnia? Fan writer Edo no Hana of An Archive of Our Own, thinks she knows.

Subjects placed on vigil at AEthelmearc's Agincourt

Maestra Giulietta da Venezia reports that, at Their Court Their Majesties, Isenwulf and Rosalinda, King and Queen of AEthelmear, served  Writs of Summons on two of Their subjects, Baron Thomas Byron of Haverford and THLady Hilderun Hugelmann.

"Crisis in the Byzantine Empire" may have brought about the First Crusade

Everyone knows that the First Crusade began with a call from Pope Urban II to free Jerusalem from the Muslims. That is, everyone but British historian Peter Frankopan, whose new book, The First Crusade: the Call from the East, offers a different explanation.

November 28th

St. John's Bible completed

Nearly thirteen years ago, calligrapher Donald Jackson began an epic project to create a hand-written Bible, commissioned by St. John’s University in Minnesota. Now, with a final "Amen," the Bible has been completed. Michael Inbar of Today.com has the story. (video)

Vikings invade England in the 21st century

Recent Nordic archaeological discoveries in Great Britain have sparked a new interest in all things Viking. In an article for the Guardian, arts and media correspondent Vanessa Thorpe looks at new trends, based on old tales that are driving current British culture.

Help identify the Staffordshire Hoard "mystery object"

It's beautiful, but what is it? Archaeologists are asking that question about three gold and silver pieces from the Staffordshire Hoard that fit together. Guesses include a saddle fitting and the decorative terminal to a parchment scroll. (photos)

Murder at the Feast of St. Hedwig photos online

Vilhelm Lich reports that he has created several albums of photos from Murder at the Feast of St. Hedwig which took place recently in the Kingdom of Calontir. The photos are available on Flickr.

November 27th

Why red and green at Christmas?

As the Christmas season draws near, the colors red and green can be found everywhere, but who decided that these two colors should be associated with Christmas? Cambridge research scientist Dr Spike Bucklow believes he knows.

Pin-pointing Hastings

Battle Abbey and its surrounds, the traditional site of the Battle of Hastings between King Harold and William the Conqueror, may not be the actual site of the battle, according to a new book by Nick Austin, Secrets Of The Norman Invasion.

Medieval corpses help construct plague genetic code

An international team of researchers has reconstructed the genetic code of the Black Death using DNA extracted from the teeth of medieval corpses buried in a graveyard in London's East Smithfield. Their research has been published in the science journal Nature.

November 26th

99 Danish thanes

For those old enough to have grooved to German popstar Nena's 99 Luftballoons, this video will make your day. Nena showcases her bardic chops with a retelling of Beowulf to the tune of her signature song.

Chefs inspired by the past

Historic cookery has advanced to a point that the Wall Street Journal is taking notice. In an article by Alina Dizik, historic recipes, dating back to Roman times, are re-interpreted by the chefs of major international restaurants.

13th century Spanish document surfaces at University of Virginia

15 years ago, George Greenia discovered a 13th century medieval Spanish document, missing for centuries, in the archives at the University of Virginia’s Alderman Library. Now the contents and story of discovery of the document have been disclosed.

English class looks at vagrancy laws in Tudor England

The Cornell College (Mount Vernon, Iowa) website, which publishes the writings by students in the class, Women Writers in the Age of Shakespeare, includes a short essay on vagrancy in Tudor England. The article, Vagrancy in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century England, was written by Sara Byrnes.

November 25th

Bjorn Palsson elevated to Pelican in the Outlands

Furukusu Masahide, Blue Iris Herald for the Kingdom of the Outlands, reports that Their Majesties recently offered elevation to Bjorn Palsson.

First church in Peru found

Peruvian and Spanish archaeologists recently used historical documents from an archive in Spain to help locate the site of Peru's oldest Roman Catholic church near Piura on the country's northern coast. The church was built in 1534.

November 24th

"Mysterious" Silk Road city found

Chinese archaeologists believe they have discovered evidence of an important Silk Road city which disappeared in the 3rd century CE.

Legacy of Lions photos online

Lady Sara de la Val reports that she has created an album of photos from Legacy of Lions which took place recently in the Kingdom of Ansteorra. The photos are available on Flickr.

Archaeologists apply for funding at West Cumbrian site

A team of archaeologists led by Grampus Heritage has applied for UK£200,000 in funding from the Heritage Lottery for a three-year project to escavate Roman remains at Cockermouth and Papcastle in West Cumbria, England where a building thought to be a Roman bath was recently discovered.

November 23rd

Gatalop photos online

Danielle and Aranwen of Willow Ford report that they have created an album of photos from Gatalop which took place recently in the Kingdom of Meridies. The photos are available on SmugMug and Facebook (public).

The Story of Beowulf

See Rathflaed, the Black Bard of Meridies, (Stephen Melvin) tell the tale of Beowulf in storybook fashion on YouTube. Click, click, click. The slightly-adult audio version of the book is read by the author.

SCAdians hope to send team to Battle of the Nations

Max Von Halstern has a dream: to send Team USA to take part in Battle of the Nations, "the full-contact, extremely authentic medieval martial arts tournament held in the Ukraine." A discussion is taking place on Facebook.

Farewell to Anne McCaffrey

Anne McCaffrey, noted science fiction and fantasy author, died Monday evening, leaving behind a legacy of some of the best-loved SF/fantasy novels. She is most famous for her Dragon Riders of Pern novel, and the series that followed, blending the two genres. She was 85 years old.

November 22nd

Caltontir Fall Festival photos online

Cathus reports that he has created an album of photos from Fall Festival which took place recently in the Kingdom of Calontir. The photos are available on Flickr.

Viking sunstone may no longer be the stuff of legend

According to Hrafns Saga in the 13th century, the mighty king used a sunstone to navigate in cloudy weather. This is one of several texts that list such artifacts as among the legendary Norse seafaring abilities. New research suggests that the sunstone may be a real navigational tool.

Fibonacci: How numbers helped shape the development of modern Western Europe

In 1202, life in western Europe was changed by the publication of Liber abbaci, a book by Leonardo of Pisa, known as Fibonacci, the first general-purpose book of arithmetic in the West, which "explained the 'new' methods in terms understandable to ordinary people."

Crusader inscription found in Arabic

A 13th century inscription written in Arabic has been translated and found to be a proclamation by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II. The inscription is thought to originally be from a wall in Jaffa, Israel. The inscription is the only known example of its kind.