Archive - Jan 2011 - Story

January 12th

Stefan's Florilegium updates for January 2011

THLord Stefan li Rous has published updates for Stefan's Florilegium for January 2011.

Corpora Update - Grammar, Spelling and Format Corrections

The Board of Directors of the SCA, Inc. has proposed changes correcting grammar and spelling to Corpora, By-Laws and Corporate Policies.

January 11th

Countess Kari Kyst to Become Pelican at Gulf Wars

At Twelfth Night on January 8th, Their Majesties Bryan and Brianna of the Kingdom of Atlantia gave notice to Countess Kari Kyst to contemplate induction into Their Order of the Pelican.

Bríg ingen Érennaigh newest Laurel in Atlantia

Their Majesties Bryan and Brianna of the Kingdom of Atlantia placed Bríg ingen Érennaigh on vigil during morning court at Twelfth Night on January 8th. She was elevated to Their Order of the Laurel during evening court.

Bangor Cathedral shares 14th century manuscript

In the first quarter of the 14th century, Anian 'Sais', the Bishop of Bangor in Wales, possessed a manuscript comprised of liturgical instructions and a substantial body of plainchant. Now, thanks to a collaboration between the University and Bangor Cathedral, the manuscript is available to view online.

January 10th

Brig ingen Erennaigh placed on vigil in Atlantia

Baron Lucien de La Rochelle, Gordin Knot Pursuivant for the Kingdom of Atlantia, reports that at His Court at the Barony of Nottinghill Coill's Yule Toy Tourney, His Majesty Brian placed Baroness Brig ingen Erennaigh on vigil to contemplate elevation to the Order of the Laurel.

Tower of Pisa restored and slightly straightened

An 8-year restoration of the Tower of Pisa has ended with the tower returned to its 1838 position, 46 cm (18 inches) more vertical than it was before. Extensive stone cleaning and restoration were also completed.

Red Cross takes aim at Robin Hood

The British Red Cross has threatened a Scottish production of the pantomime show 'The Magical Adventures of Robin Hood" for placing a red cross on a nurse's costume.

January 9th

Persimmon dye from ancient Korea finds new foothold in modern world

Galot, fabric died with the juice of unripe persimmons, likely originated in Korea in the 15th century and became the mainstay clothing of farmers and fisherman. Largely lost to the centuries, a fashion designer is reviving the art on the resort island of Jeju.

Graz Armory photos online

Graz Armory, in the foothills of the Austrian Alps, is an amazing collection of late period arms and armor. On a trip to Austria, Dan Howlett spent some time photosgraphing the Graz collection, along with the Military Museum in Vienna. His results are available online.

Roman farm found in Suffolk

Archaeologists working on the site of a new school in Lowestoft, England, believe they have discovered the remains of a 1st century Roman farm where a family of 12 might have lived.

January 8th

Head of French king identified

A battery of tests by a Frenc team of forensic scientists have identified the embalmed head of King Henry IV of France. The head disappeared during the French Revolution.

Bhakail Yule photos online

Cateline la broderesse reports that she has created an album of photos from Bhakail Yule which took place recently in the Kingdom of the East. The photos are available on Picasaweb.

Was Columbus really Polish?

An international team of distinguished professors have a new theory on the origins of Christopher Columbus: the explorer was really the son of Vladislav III, an exiled King of Poland.

January 7th

Counting the days, Julian-style

On the website Some Notes on Medieval English Genealogy, Chris Phillips has posted a Julian calender, used in England from the 11th - 16th centuries, and it is organized either by historical year or by regnal year.

A bit of history for pop music lovers: Beowulf

What do you get when you mashup an eighth-century Anglo-Saxon poem with a twentieth-century antiwar pop song? A very amusing music video, sort of a "Cliff's Notes" version of the epic tale.

Antikythera mechanism re-created using Lego Technic building set

Two thousand years ago, the Greeks built a mechanical computer to calculate eclipse dates with surprising accuracy. A modern-day historian has created a working replica of the device using Lego Technic building blocks.

January 6th

Three to attain peerages in Calontir

At the recent Kris Kinder event in the Kingdom of Calontir, Their Majesties Ashir and Maerwynn invited three of Their subjects to consider elevation to peerages.

A burial at Viking World

On December 1, 2010, the bones of an 1,100-year-old pagan were interred at the Viking World museum in Reykjanesbaer, Iceland. The remains, first discovered in 1868, are part of an exhibit on ancient pagan burials.

Restorations due at Westminster Abbey before royal wedding

The announcement that the upcoming wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton comes as mana from heaven for officials responsible for the upkeep of Westminter Abbey, the site of the spring nuptials.

January 5th

Crusader "rest stop" found in Bulgaria

In the 12th century, crusaders were known to have stopped at the Byzantine city of Blismos along the old Roman road in modern Bulgaria. Now archaeologists believe they have found the city near the village of Zlatna Livada.

Latin lost language in Iowa

"We’ll come to Xavier if you teach us Latin." said the granddaughters of Justin Kramer, who is teaches the language at one of only two schools in the state of Iowa."

Artifacts prove Welsh city's importance in Roman society

This Christmas, locals and visitors to Aberystwyth, Wales will be treated to a display of 4th century Roman artifacts at the Ceredigion Museum. The pieces were most likely owned by a wealthy landowner.

January 4th

Da Vinci document discovered in French library

A "fragment of paper with brown scrawls" discovered recently in a public library in the French city of Nantes was not just trash. It was a coded document written by Leonardo da Vinci. (photo)

A Celtic Amazing Grace

Violinist Andre Rieu wows a stadium full of spectators with a beautiful Celtic rendition of the hymn Amazing Grace, complete with a band of pipers and a lone pennywhistle. The video is available on YouTube.

Modern economic analysis of the Domesday Book

In 1086, William the Conqueror undertook the daunting task of cataloging his estates and possesions in England. The results are known as the Domesday Book. Now author John McDonald is using modern economic analysis to evaluate the productivity of the Wiltshire estates.

January 3rd

Indonesian fishermen find medieval shipwreck

Fishermen in Indonesia have found a shipwreck that probably dates to the 14th century. The wooden ship contains green and gray ceramics similar to what Chinese merchants traded at the time.

Space science technology to be used in Renaissance restoration

Two important Tudor tombs will benefit from technology developed for space science research in a new project led by experts from the University of Leicester.

Medieval Gunpowder Research Group reports

The Medieval Gunpowder Research Group has posted a series of studies relating to use of gunpowder in the Middle Ages. The reports were produced by Middelaldercentret, Nykøbing Falster, Denmark.

January 2nd

Medieval alabaster comes to Florida

Sixty pieces of alabaster sculpture from the Victoria & Albert Museum are going on display at the Society of Four Arts in Palm Beach, Florida (USA). The pieces date to the 14th and 15th century, and many still have original paint.