Archive - Jul 2010 - Story

Renaissance tapestries at Columbia Museum of Art

The Columbia Museum of Art in Columbia, South Carolina will host Imperial Splendor: Renaissance Tapestries from Vienna May 21, 2010 - September 19, 2010. The tapestries are from the collection of the Kunsthistorisches of Vienna.

Byzantine church unearthed in Turkey

A well preserved Byzantine church has been found in Demre, Turkey, the sity of the ancient city of Myre.

"Funny signal" leads to one of Britain's largest Roman coin hoards

Archaeologists are marveling over the discovery of "one of the largest ever finds of Roman coins in Britain." Over 52,000 3rd centruy coins were found by hobbyist Dave Crisp buried a foot below the surface of a field near Frome in Somerset, England.

Iceland's early settlers cause scholarly debate

Icelandic scholars are still debating who the country's first settlers actually were. Tradition states that Ingólfur and Hjörleifur were the first settlers, but new evidence may show that 870, the date of their arrival, may not be correct.

July 30th

Fighting and crafting in Evansville

Independence Day 2010 gave members of the Shire of Riviere Constelle a chance to display their crafting and fighting skills to the public at a demo at Wesselman Park. Dan Shaw of the Evansville (Indiana) Courier Press spoke with several members about the SCA. (photos)

Photos from Caid's Crown Prints Prize online

Fausta shares an album of photos taken at the recent Crown Prints Prize event in the Kingdom of Caid.

Byzantine mosaics uncovered in Syria

A wide-ranging collection of Byzantine mosaics unearthed in Daraa Province, Syria, now includes works of art from churches and private homes. Human and animal subjects are depicted in scenes of daily life. 

Barony of Sternfeld Tries Podcasting

The Barony of Sternfeld (Midrealm) has started an experimental podcast, the Sterncast.  The first episode features an interview with Master Johann von Metten about Animal Husbandry in the SCA and the raising of Medieval breeds of chickens.

SCA Announce: SCA Subsidiary class added at Pennsic

SCA President Sean o’Shaughnessy (Tom Hughes) reports that an additional session of the SCA Corporate Subsidiaries class has been added to the Pennsic 39 University schedule.

July 29th

Midrealm baron to champion cancer research at Pennsic 39

Baroness Maerwynn of the Barony of Brendoken in the Midrealm has announced that her lord husband, Baron Einar Blakklar, will take on all comers to raise money for cancer research.

Constructing a medieval tunic

Caitlin nic Raighne has created a website with instructions on how to make a geometric tunic. The instructions include diagrams, fabric selections and sewing directions.

Vlad the Misunderstood

An exhibit in Bucharest, Romania, is trying to rehabilitate the image of Vlad Dracula, aka Vlad the Impaler. The exhibit uses period illustrations and manuscripts to show the 15th century Wallachian ruler as the victim of Western European propaganda intended to show Eastern Europe in a barbaric light.

Archaeologists excavate London's first theatre

Archeologists are excavating "The Theater", London's first known successful playhouse, where it is believed that Shakespeare himself worked and may have even acted. The building was completed in 1576, and historians believe that Romeo and Juliet premiered there.

Medieval rosaries

SCA member Christian de Holacombe (Chris Laning), a medieval scholar from Davis, California, has created a blog entitle Paternoster Row to share some of her research on rosaries and prayer beads.

July 28th

Children's Water Battle reinstated for Pennsic 39

Thanks to a monumental effort on the part of Her Royal Majesty of Aethelmearc, Tessa, and a team of Shadowclans members, the Pennsic Children’s Water Battle will take place after all.

"Salamander" published online

Salamander, a new fantasy novel written by David Friedman (Duke Cariadoc of the Bow), is available online.

Skeletons, weapons, clothes found from Thirty Year's War

Two skeletons and other artifacts dating to the Thirty Years War were found in Stralsund, Germany. Muskets engraved with the owners initials have helped identify the bodies as Hapsburg soldiers.

Help Wanted - Tournaments Illuminated Editor and Art Director

The Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA) is seeking candidates for the positions of Tournaments Illuminated Editor and Art Director. The current officer steps down in April, 2011, and in order to ensure a smooth transition, applications for the positions are being accepted now for training to begin in January, 2011.

Who really named America?

We all know the schoolboy version of the naming of the American continents: merchant explorer Amerigo Vespucci supposedly named the New World after himself. But a little-known proofreader and scholar named Matthias Ringmann may actually be responsible.

Artemisia's Uprising 2010 photos online

Darius Coligny reports that he has uploaded several albums of photos from the June 16-20, 2010 Uprising event in the Kingdom of Artemisia.

July 27th

Known World Children's Fete, Pennsic 39

Good Gentles, please join us for a day of friendship and jubilee on Wednesday, August 11th from 1 to 4 pm in the Barn for the Known World Children’s Fete.

SCA Discount at Ozark Medieval Fortress

THL Melandra of the Woods, who modernly works as the Education Coordinator for Ozark Medieval Fortress, has announced that the organization is offering a discount to traveling SCA folk on their way to or from three of the SCA's major events this year.

Change to SCA Webminister Chain of Command

The Board of Directors of the Society for Creative Anachronism, Inc. has announced a change in the Webminister chain of command.

Cannons, not mirrors: Archimedes legend revised

Debunking a legend begun in the Middle Ages, new research suggests Archimedes used steam cannons to set fire to Roman warships. The legend claimed that during the siege of Syracuse, mirrors were used to create a deadly concentration of sunlight that set the ships aflame.

Oldest illuminated Bible found in Ethiopia

Researchers have dated the Garima Gospels to between 350 and 650 CE, making it the oldest known illuminated Christian Bible.

July 26th

New marking convention for minors in armored combat with adults

Sir Tristen Sexwulf, Earl Marshal of the Kingdom of AEthelmearc, reports on new conventions for marking minor involved in armored combat with adults.

What the Romans (and Greeks) can do for us

Latin teacher and blogger Denis Ambrose, Jr. is often asked to justify his existence to people who think "high school is nothing more than preparation for college, and college is nothing more than job training." He has compiled a list of five pragmatic reasons to study classics.

Steampunk new outlet for costumers and reenactors

Steampunk has caught on in Australia, just the latest of a series of "dress-up" activities such as LARPing or the Society for Creative Anachronism. Rachel Wells of The Age (Melbourne, Australia) has the story.

Armored critters

Tom and Jerry might have had a better chance of surviving if they had had the help of Canadian artist Jeff de Boer. His armor of cats and mice is showcased on the Beautiful Life website.

July 25th

Shava's photos of Thatsa Mare online

Viscountess Elashava bas Riva has posted photos from Thatsa Mare, which took place recently in the Kingdom of Northshield.