Archive - Dec 2010 - Story

December 13th

Toronto man killed with crossbow in public library

A Toronto man was shot and killed with a crossbow while visiting a public library. The assailant, believed to be the victim's son, walked into the crowded library, fired the cross bow, and then left.

December 12th

Stirling Castle knight identified

The skeletal remains of a knight found at Stirling Castle in Scotland have been identified as those of English nobleman Sir John de Stricheley, who died in 1341. De Stricheley was probably killed by a Scottish arrow.

Persian garb patterns

On the Middle Eastern Dance Guild website, Melinda Haren (Mistress Roxane Farabi Shahzadeh) has posted a number of patterns for Persian garb that she has created.

December 11th

SCA Volunteer Agreement Pulled for Rework

Dori Andrepont, Publications Manager for the Society for Creative Anachronism, reports that the SCA Volunteer Agreement has been pulled for a rework.

What's in David's hand?

A new study of Michelangelo's David concludes that the hero holds a "secret weapon in his right hand." A paper on the subject was presented at "Florens 2010: The International Week of Cultural and Environmental Heritage," a three-day tribute to the masterpiece.

December 10th

Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilizations online

A team of Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, research scholars and one professor have created the Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilizations, a mapping and spatial analysis of the Roman and medieval worlds using the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) information system.

Christmas in Ireland - Viking style

In an article for Irish America Magazine, Edythe Preet ponders Viking history and influences in Ireland, including linguistically and in the celebration of the holiday season, especially when it comes to food and drink.

Duke Sir Alaric of Bangor elevated to Laurel in Drachenwald

Duchess Nerissa reports that Duke Sir Alaric of Bangor was elevated to the Order of the Laurel at Yule Ball by Their Majesies of the Kingdom of Drachenwald.

December 9th

Genevieve d'Aquitaine elevated in Atlantia

At Their morning Crown Tournament Court, Their Majesties Bryan and Brianna of the Kingdom of Atlantia offered Genevieve d'Aquitaine entrance into the Order of the Laurel.

Danish Royal Library "E-manuscripts" available online

Collections from the Manuscript Department of the Danish Royal Library are now available to view and study online. The collection includes illuminated manuscripts, letters, diaries and other written materials.

Hand guns used in War of the Roses

Parts of two handheld guns have been found at Towton Battlefield, site of a bloody battle during the War of the Roses.  Previous to this discovery, archaeologists thought that firearms were only used against castles.

December 8th

BBC showcases the Magna Carta

Lord Mungo Napier of the Kingdom of Atlantia has put together a short selection of articles from the BBC on the Magna Carta, which celebrates the 800th anniversary of its signing in 2015.

Photos from Calontir's Queen's Prize 2010 online

Vilhelm Lich reports that he has created an album of photos from the Queen's Prize event which took place recently in the Kingdom of Calontir. The photos are available on Flickr.

Medieval jewelry and ornamentation discussed on website

On his website Dress, Jewels, Arms and Coat of Arms: Material Culture and Self-Representation in the Late Middle Ages, Gerhard Jaritz has posted a manual of basic information on medieval jewelry and ornamentation.

December 7th

Estrella Special Events Deadline / A&S Categories information

Katrina von Rosenberg, the Special Events Coordinator for Estrella War XXVII and THL Raven Mayne, Atenveldt Minister of Arts & Sciences, have posted information about the upcoming War.

Tomb of medieval warrior found in Russia

Archaeologists have found the tomb of a 14th century soldier in the Adygeya region of Russia. The body was found with a saber and arrows along with other ornate grave goods.

Byward Angel scanned by medical imaging technique

A team of researchers is using Optical Coherence Tomography, a medical imaging technique, to study the Byward Angel, a well-preserved wall mural in the medieval section of the Tower of London. Expert believe the painting dates to the late 14th century. (video)

December 6th

Viking potter finds market in the SCA

British potter Kate Phillips wanted to go to art school. Instead she became a nurse. Now, nearly 50 years later, Phillips has found her muse in hand-thrown Viking pottery, which she often sells at SCA events.

Roman soldier tweets hopes and fears for school kids

If they had had them, the Romans would have used them -- cell phones, that is. Now a group of British schoolchildren will have the chance to follow the "hopes, fears and experiences of a fictional 26-year-old Roman soldier called Marcus" on Twitter.

Modern Humours Yahoo Group

Mistress Christianna MacGrain reports on the formation of the Modern Humours Yahoo Group, a discussion forum "open to all persons interested in historical reenactment while dealing with food sensitivities."

December 5th

Study of 1510 pandemic may help modern researchers

A new study of the 1510 influenza pandemic by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases may help modern doctors plan for preventing, controlling and treating such diseases.

"Last Judgment" models found in Turkish bathhouses?

The writhing, muscular figures in Michelangelo's Last Judgment fresco in the Sistine Chapel may have been inspired by men encountered by the artist in Rome's gay brothels and bathhouses according to Elena Lazzarini, whose new book Nudity, art and decorum: aesthetic changes in the art of the 16th century explores the theory. (photo)

Viking necklace found in cave a mystery

Archaeologists are puzzled over the spring 2010 discovery of a rare 9th century Viking necklace consisting of "71 glass beads covered with gold foil." The necklace was discovered during an excavation of Glencurran Cave in the Burren National Park. (photo)

December 4th

Headless gladiator mystery continues

Archaeologists are still debating the meaning of the burial of 46 decapitated men in a Roman cemetery in northern England. The remains, most of which originiated from far-flung localities, were buried with honor in a prestigious cemetery.

Medieval religious building reflects modern conflict

In the 8th century, the caliphs of Cordoba, Spain constructed the magnificent great mosque. After their conquest, 13th century Christians rechristened the building a cathedral. Now the two cultures have begun to clash again over tourist signs.

SCAdian couple shows off skills to Fort Morgan Times

Martha Monsson's talents include knitting, chrocheting, spinning, and weaving. Equally impressive is her collection of histric textile tools, ranging from 19th century spinning wheels to an authentic Roman distaff.

December 3rd

Photos from Caid's Coronation and Queens Champion online

Kitta reports that a large album of photos from Caid Coronation and Queen's Champion are now available to view online. The photos were taken by Earl, and are available on SmugMug.

SCA "bad citizen" opens coffee shop in Missouri

SCA member Mark Abbott is a bad citizen, at least according to a Hallsville, Missouri Alderman, when the local lawyer applied for a permit to open a bar in town. Jodie Jackson Jr. of the Columbia Daily Tribune has the story.

History of spectacles

Corrective lenses have a long history. Glasses filled with water and gems were used by Romans in the 1st century, while the Chinese developed spectacles in the 13th. In an article for the Telegraph, Victoria Ward looks at the history of eyeglasses.

December 2nd

Harry Potter flies into the classroom

With Quidditch teams forming on college campuses, it was only a matter of time before Harry Potter entered the classroom. This year, universities in the United States and England are offering a variety of classes based on the popular series.