Archive - Aug 2009 - Story

August 8th

Mons Tonitrus A&S championship draws media interest

It was a day for investigating the arts and sciences of the Middle Ages when members of the Barony of Mons Tonitrus (Kingdom of Atenveldt) held an arts and science competition at Cochise College. Bill Hess of the Sierra Vista Herald attended the event to learn more. (photo)

August 7th

Battle records of English soldiers 1369 to 1453 now online

The detailed service records of 250,000 soldiers who served during the Hundred Years War is now availa le to view online. The website, sponsored by Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC), was the brainchild of Anne Curry of the University of Southampton and Dr Adrian Bell of the University of Reading.

Remains of Copernicus finally identified

After two centuries, scientists believe that they have found the final resting place of Nicolaus Copernicus, the father of modern astronomy. They also believe he had blue eyes.

August 6th

Photos from Court at Ansteorra's XXX Year

Domai/Kitsu has created an album of photos from the recent XXX Year Celebration in the Kingdom of Ansteorra and posted them on her Flickr website.

YouthCombat.com offers help to young fighters

Lord Wulf cu Battell of the Shire of Arenal has crated a website to "help parents and children interested or already involved in Youth Combat to find more information and help further the Youth Combat program."

August 5th

Calontir Summer 2009 Crown Lyst photos and video online

SÃaghdha mac Roberd reports that he has created an album of photos from the July 11, 2009 Crown Lyst in the Kingdom of Calontir.

Codex Sinaiticus now available online

After years of restoration and digitalization, the Codex Sinaiticus, the earliest surviving Christian Bible, is now available online.

August 4th

Brampton Roman artifacts to be displayed for the first time

An amazing collection of Roman artifacts discovered 50 years ago near Brampton, England, is scheduled to go on display for the first time in late 2009. (video)

Death of Henry Hudson still a mystery

Explorer Henry Hudson died in 1611. That much is known, but the circumstances of his death are still a mystery. Could it have been murder?

August 3rd

Danish expert declares Vinland Map genuine

For years, experts have disputed the legitimacy of the Vinland Map, the famous 15th century map which depicted parts of North America many years before its discovery by Christopher Columbus. Now Rene Larsen, rector of the School of Conservation under the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, has declared the map genuine.

8th century Islamic vase links Japan to the Silk Road

Researchers in Nara, Japan are excited by the discovery of shards from an Islamic vase dating to the 8th century at the former location of the Heijokyo palace.

August 2nd

An Elevation to the Peerage

During Their final Court at July Coronation, Their Majesties Vik and Inga called forth The Honorable Lord Randall the Redowtable and placed him on vigil for elevation to the Order of the Laurel; which celebration will take place at September Crown Tourney.

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan a stately pleasure-dome decree

Marco Polo, in his travel notes, wrote of Kublai Khan's massive capital, Xanadu. Now Chinese archaeologists believe they can reconstruct a layout of the city. The basis for their claim is a three-month long excavation of Yuan Shangdu, which they think is the historic Xanadu.

August 1st

Researchers seek identity of 51 beheaded bodies from 10th century England

Archaeologists are continuing to study 51 bodies that were apparently buried naked, with their heads stacked to the side, on a prominent hillside between 890 and 1034 C.E.

Barony of Cynnabar finds its roots at Saline Celtic Festival

It was a wet day, but that didn't deter members of the barony of Cynnabar (Ann Arbor, Michigan) from participating in the Saline Celtic Festival. Sheila Pursglove of the Saline Reporter covered the damp happenings of the day.